Ubuntu 13.04 'Raring Ringtail' released


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fusi0n

Awesome!!! Ubuntu 12.10 had A L O T of bugs in it.. It might have been the worst Ubuntu released.. I hope this is better.

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Shaun N.

Good, although it tuns like crap on my daughters PC

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(Spork)

hmm wonder if this still has the nvidia card driver problems

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fusi0n

hmm wonder if this still has the nvidia card driver problems

I hope not.. damn it I hope not..

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Shaun N.

hmm wonder if this still has the nvidia card driver problems

Both Nvidia and Ati release new drivers over the ;ast few days and so this might have resolved a few remaining issues with graphics drivers

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f0rk_b0mb

IMO, the *buntu's are still very buggy and slow compared to other distros of Linux. However, when I used the 13.04 daily builds, is was a LOT better than previous versions. I too had the NVIDIA driver issues and had to reboot into text mode and delete my xorg.conf or something like that to fix it.

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(Spork)

Both Nvidia and Ati release new drivers over the ;ast few days and so this might have resolved a few remaining issues with graphics drivers

lets hope so i dont have the time to fight with the drivers thats the reason i went back to winblows

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HawkMan

I think I'll replace the xbmcbuntu install on my secondary media center(technically it was supposed to replace my old one, but faulty parts and many months of delays and a leftover PUS that fixed my old working one put it as a secondary one upstairs on the computer room) and see if this and XBMC installed separately works better.

not that xbmcbuntu don't work well. but... not control panel to config stuff. doesn't want to connect to any SMB shares, just says it can't find them whatever I put in. so I'll see if this works better.

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Gullible Jones

Huh, looks like it doesn't use Mir by default. Is Mir even usable on it yet? What about Unity Next (the QML version)?

As much as Mir has gotten a bad rap, I like the idea of an X replacement that's actually portable to BSD.

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ViperAFK

Huh, looks like it doesn't use Mir by default. Is Mir even usable on it yet? What about Unity Next (the QML version)?

As much as Mir has gotten a bad rap, I like the idea of an X replacement that's actually portable to BSD.

We won't see mir by default until unity-next, which is slated for 14.04 (and I have my doubts about that timeline). It will probably be testable in 13.10, but definitely not default. 13.10 will still use gnome 3.8/unity/compiz by default.

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HawkMan

As I understood it, Mir is a long way from being ready an certainly from being default.

We won't see mir by default until unity-next, which is slated for 14.04 (and I have my doubts about that timeline). It will probably be testable in 13.10, but definitely not default. 13.10 will still use gnome 3.8/unity/compiz by default.

By the time Mir is ready for public testing, they will probably have understood their in way above their heads and changed their mind and gone wayland. If not, I don't put much faith in the Ubuntu devs self insight anymore.

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fusi0n

Here is a Linux N00b question.. can you use Ubuntu's repositories on other debian based distros?

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articuno1au

Some of them. Depends on what the packages rely on.

You can definitely use Debian packages on Ubuntu.

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matt4444

Here is a Linux N00b question.. can you use Ubuntu's repositories on other debian based distros?

Possibly, but don't you require PPA or something?

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Damo R.

I might install this, having problems with my Win 7 atm the only drawback is my Nvidia because it used to flicker on flash videos and normal videos on playback and it annoyed me...is that fixed? can someone confirm?

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Tuhin12

Must say this was the most stable beta of them all...Ri8 now downloadn d image...Actually RARING TO GO!!!

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Karl L.

Here is a Linux N00b question.. can you use Ubuntu's repositories on other debian based distros?

In general, no, but it depends on the distro. You can use Ubuntu PPAs directly on Linux Mint because it uses Ubuntu repositories directly, but they cannot be used directly on Debian or Crunchbang. For example, the Wine PPA for Ubuntu 12.04 will work on Linux Mint 13 since it is directly based on Ubuntu 12.04, but will not work on Debian 7 because of the older libc version and a couple other slight different package versions. However, a distro like Crunchbang that is based on Debian can directly use repositories designed for Debian. For example, the debmultimedia repository for Debian 7 will work on Crunchbag Waldorf since it is directly based on Debian 7.

Rule of Thumb: A package repository only works with the specific version of the distribution it was designed for unless explicitly stated otherwise by either the maintainer of the repository or another distribution.

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fusi0n

In general, no, but it depends on the distro. You can use Ubuntu PPAs directly on Linux Mint because it uses Ubuntu repositories directly, but they cannot be used directly on Debian or Crunchbang. For example, the Wine PPA for Ubuntu 12.04 will work on Linux Mint 13 since it is directly based on Ubuntu 12.04, but will not work on Debian 7 because of the older libc version and a couple other slight different package versions. However, a distro like Crunchbang that is based on Debian can directly use repositories designed for Debian. For example, the debmultimedia repository for Debian 7 will work on Crunchbag Waldorf since it is directly based on Debian 7.

Rule of Thumb: A package repository only works with the specific version of the distribution it was designed for unless explicitly stated otherwise by either the maintainer of the repository or another distribution.

Thanks

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spy beef

Just tried it... why is Ubuntu slower than my Windows 8 boot?

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HawkMan

boot speed has never been a linux forte.

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articuno1au

Just tried it... why is Ubuntu slower than my Windows 8 boot?

The above, and Ubuntu is quite slow relative to other *nix systems.

It's got a lot more user friendly stuff, and this tends to take up CPU time and memory >.<

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fusi0n

boot speed has never been a linux forte.

Nope.. lol

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Mindovermaster

I installed it yesterday night. It seems more streamlined than 12.10 was.

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