Ubuntu 13.04 'Raring Ringtail' released


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ViperAFK

I kinda suspected that. I haven't tried removing services or building out a minimal install because I have no interest in running Ubuntu full time; I just like to keep up with its development and try new releases because it is very popular and closely related to the distro I contribute most heavily to.

That's interesting. Why would you say that? All throughout the SysVInit vs. Systemd debate in Debian and elsewhere I have not heard anyone offer an argument (not to mention a convincing argument) that Upstart is superior to Systemd. The best justification of Upstart I have heard yet is that it preceded Systemd, so Upstart is justified being in a less advanced state. Even then I have not heard an argument for its adoption outside of Ubuntu, although some argue that it is acceptable for Ubuntu to stick with it by virtue of the fact that it is already in place and migration would be an unnecessary hassle.

I think you misunderstood my post (I may have worded it poorly). I didn't say upstart is superior to systemd, I said systemd is indeed better than upstart, but that I do think both of them are much better than sysvinit.

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Karl L.

I didn't say upstart is superior to systemd, I said systemd is indeed better than upstart, but that I do think both of them are much better than sysvinit.

Oops. I misread your post. I thought I was going to get an interesting explanation that I've never heard before. It turns out that I actually agree with your point.

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Kreuger

Ive had nothing but problems since upgrading.

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Growled

Ive had nothing but problems since upgrading.

What kind of problems?

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Kreuger

What kind of problems?

Well when I rebooted after updating, I was greeted with the lxde login manager. Put in my credentials and got nothing. It won't boot to the GUI no matter what desktop I pick. So finally, I hit ctrl+alt+f2 for a terminal and ran startlxde but it gives me an error about connecting to the display. So I ran startx instead and it required me to install gnome. So now Im stuck running gnome-shell (which I can't stand) because nothing else will work. And this is the only way I can get it to login, too. Now I run lxpanel after booting so that I can have some sort of comfort of normalcy, and the menu has no icons.

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ViperAFK

Well when I rebooted after updating, I was greeted with the lxde login manager. Put in my credentials and got nothing. It won't boot to the GUI no matter what desktop I pick. So finally, I hit ctrl+alt+f2 for a terminal and ran startlxde but it gives me an error about connecting to the display. So I ran startx instead and it required me to install gnome. So now Im stuck running gnome-shell (which I can't stand) because nothing else will work. And this is the only way I can get it to login, too. Now I run lxpanel after booting so that I can have some sort of comfort of normalcy, and the menu has no icons.

Sounds like your upgrade is b0rked, I'd try a clean install...

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(Account no longer active)

Good, although it tuns like crap on my daughters PC

Give Lubuntu a go (or, install LXDE and log into that). GNOME and KDE are pretty resource intensive.

boot speed has never been a linux forte.

I once had my Linux boot time down to 10 seconds (but I wasn't using GNOME or KDE)...

Many people have forgot that Linux is all about customization - it gives you so many more options than other OSs. You probably couldn't tell what distro I am using if I were to post a screenshot.

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HawkMan

Many people have forgot that Linux is all about customization - it gives you so many more options than other OSs. You probably couldn't tell what distro I am using if I were to post a screenshot.

Geeks tend to forget that most people don't want to spend hours and days "customizing" their computers or phones, they just want them to work. heck It's starting to annoy me as well when I can't just install and get going.

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Kreuger

Sounds like your upgrade is b0rked, I'd try a clean install...

I was hoping to avoid that so I dont lose 200gb+ of torrents.

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n_K

I was hoping to avoid that so I dont lose 200gb+ of torrents.

Why would you lose all your data?

Remove all folders but /home/ and /root/ (assuming you only store stuff there) and then do a normal install without formatted = no lost data.

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f0rk_b0mb

I was hoping to avoid that so I dont lose 200gb+ of torrents.

Buy an external drive and back everything up? You can get a 2TB drive now a days for 70 bucks.

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+John Teacake

Well when I rebooted after updating, I was greeted with the lxde login manager. Put in my credentials and got nothing. It won't boot to the GUI no matter what desktop I pick. So finally, I hit ctrl+alt+f2 for a terminal and ran startlxde but it gives me an error about connecting to the display. So I ran startx instead and it required me to install gnome. So now Im stuck running gnome-shell (which I can't stand) because nothing else will work. And this is the only way I can get it to login, too. Now I run xpanel after booting so that I can have some sort of comfort of normalcy, and the menu has no icons.

I have EXACTLY the same problem doh! Although I am loving the subtle but well done graphical changes to Ubuntu this time round. :D

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Kreuger

Remove all folders but /home/ and /root/ (assuming you only store stuff there) and then do a normal install without formatted = no lost data.

Im assuming this is some kind of configuration issue which likely means it's somewhere in my /home folder. I've thought of deleting the .cache and .config folders as well as the ones for lxde and the other DEs but Im not sure itd make a difference.

Buy an external drive and back everything up? You can get a 2TB drive now a days for 70 bucks.a

I know that. But I really don't have the money for it. I have space on my desktop but its a lot of work to move the data there and then back afterwards and getting the client to pick it up after too.

Edit: Someone suggested I switch to lightdm instead of lxdm and now everything works as normal. Not sure what the hell is wrong with lxdm.

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+John Teacake

Im assuming this is some kind of configuration issue which likely means it's somewhere in my /home folder. I've thought of deleting the .cache and .config folders as well as the ones for lxde and the other DEs but Im not sure itd make a difference.

I know that. But I really don't have the money for it. I have space on my desktop but its a lot of work to move the data there and then back afterwards and getting the client to pick it up after too.

Edit: Someone suggested I switch to lightdm instead of lxdm and now everything works as normal. Not sure what the hell is wrong with lxdm.

How do you do that? ...

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Kreuger

I already had lightdm installed (not sure how but it doesnt matter). If you don't, just check out this page. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LightDM

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medhunter

I have 12.10 now.I wanted to upgrade , But I prefer new install for vanilla, complete experience.

the only thing I need to know is how to backup my Home directory.Any Ideas?

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Karl L.

I have 12.10 now.I wanted to upgrade , But I prefer new install for vanilla, complete experience.

the only thing I need to know is how to backup my Home directory.Any Ideas?

You could do one of a couple things. If your home directory is on its own partition (which is not default in Ubuntu AFAIK), you can simply reinstall without formatting that partition. If not, you can use the method n_K suggested earlier in this thread and delete everything other than /home using the live install disc before you perform the new installation. Using that method you would need to make sure you install to the original partition without reformatting it! You could also copy your home directory to another EXT4 partition while maintaining permissions, then copy it back after the installation.

The last solution is the most time intensive but least risky. You could implement it as follows:


# Set this variable for convenience so you can just copy/paste the rest of the backup commands.
export BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME=<your_backup_drive>

# Backup your home directory to another EXT4 volume, maintaining permissions and attributes.
cp -a $HOME /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/$USER

# Backup your user id and effective group id.
echo "backup_date: $(date)" > /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info
echo "user_name: $USER" >> /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info
echo "user_id: $(id -u)" >> /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info
echo "user_group: $(id -g)" >> /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info



# Install Ubuntu 13.04, wiping everything on your system (other than your backup drive, of course).



# You need to set this variable again since you closed your previous terminal window (and installed a new system).
export BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME=<your_backup_drive>

# Check your new user id and group id.
cat /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info
echo "new_user_id: $(id -u)"
echo "new_user_group: $(id -g)"

# If your new user id and new group id match the old, run the following command.
cp -a /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/$(cat /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info | grep 'user_name: ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2)/* $HOME

# If your new user id or new group id do not match the old, run the following commands.
sudo cp -a /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/$(cat /media/$BACKUP_DRIVE_NAME/backup_info | grep 'user_name: ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2)/* $HOME
export NEW_USER_ID=$(id -u)
export NEW_GROUP_ID=$(id -g)
sudo chown -R ${NEW_USER_ID}:${NEW_GROUP_ID} $HOME
[/CODE]

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medhunter

thanks, xorangekiller

I didn't have a dedicated partition for my /home , so I will delete all folders and install without formatting

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(Spork)

Ubuntu 13.04 is "great success!" -Boart

The nvidia problems are fixed!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

so tempted to install this lol

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Growled

Well, I don't care much for Ubuntu or Kubuntu, but Lubuntu is the bomb. Gonna install it this weekend for further playing.

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medhunter

Just installed Xubuntu 13.04 on my 2Y. old Netbook: Dell inspiron mini 1018 and it Rocks.very light, productive

I love it on my netbook

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ViperAFK

Just installed Xubuntu 13.04 on my 2Y. old Netbook: Dell inspiron mini 1018 and it Rocks.very light, productive

I love it on my netbook

Yeah I've switched over both my laptops over to xubuntu 13.04, its great. Very stable, much less buggy than unity.

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HawkMan

Xubuntu annoys me because it doesn't support "snap" by default, and xubuntu 32 and 64 is what I put on my multiboot tool for linux OS'

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ViperAFK

Xubuntu annoys me because it doesn't support "snap" by default, and xubuntu 32 and 64 is what I put on my multiboot tool for linux OS'

Actually, it does and its enabled by default. there's just another poor default set that breaks snapping to the left/right because the setting to move the window to another virtual desktop when you drag to the left or right is enabled by default. You simply need to go to settings > window manager > advanced and disable "Wrap workspaces when the pointer reaches a screen edge", and then snapping left/right/up/down all works.

I think that default should be changed, but its not a huge deal because the setting can easily be adjusted.

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Growled

Running Xubuntu 13.04 now. A funny story on why I installed it instead of Lubuntu. I was all set to install Lubuntu and I decided to try Xubuntu one last time. A friend of mine came over and he saw it running and was blown away. So I decided to install that instead and I'm glad that I did. It really is awesome. Got Virtualbox installed with Windows 7 for those times I need it. Running just great.

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