AC adapters required New 3DS/XL


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It seems that countries which used to get the AC adapter included with the 3DS consoles now don't:

 

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So much for trading in my current 3DS to cover some of the costs of the new one.

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I found this out when i got a 3DS XL here in the UK too. It really is the most ridiculous thing ever selling a hand held gaming console without a charger, especially when the charger has a proprietary connection.

 

I can't imagine most people just happen to have 3DS chargers laying around like Nintendo presume.

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I found this out when i got a 3DS XL here in the UK too. It really is the most ridiculous thing ever selling a hand held gaming console without a charger, especially when the charger has a proprietary connection.

 

I can't imagine most people just happen to have 3DS chargers laying around like Nintendo presume.

 

 

yeah it is pretty retarded.    they just expect people to have older models, but many will sell them to get new ones.  so it will not work

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Yeah I don't understand this. Their reasoning was that people will upgrade to the XL and not have a charger.

I don't know many people who have upgraded, and those that have will have sold/traded in their 3DS to pay for it :s.

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you know, the first gameboys did not come with a power adapter, you could purchase one separately if you so choose.  I don't see a problem with having to purchase a adapter separately. 

 

I have had gameboys, turbografix express, and the sega gamegear (the last handheld video game system I ever owned)....  none came with adapters.

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you know the first gameboys did not come with a power adapter, you could purchase one separately if you so choose.  I don't see a problem with having to purchase a adapter separately. 

The Gameboy runs on 4 standard AA batteries. The 3DS has a rechargeable battery, which cannot be replaced easily. How can you not see the problem? :huh:

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The Gameboy runs on 4 standard AA batteries. The 3DS has a rechargeable battery, which cannot be replaced easily. How can you not see the problem? :huh:

well now that is a small problem isn't it?

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well now that is a small problem isn't it?

But it's basically like buying an Xbox One or PS4, and it not including the power supply. I doubt most would be too happy, so why should Nintendo get away with doing something like this?

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Ridiculous.

 

However I understand why: instead of shipping localized new 3DS/XL boxes, just have one worldwide model (cheaper), and get customers to purchase the power adapter (for their region) separately (only difference between localized boxes).

 

Offering support for charging via USB would have been even better; I'm tired of proprietary connectors/plug packs.

 

What's worse is that many people will buy $2 Chinese fire starters alternates off eBay. Wouldn't be surprised to read about a new 3DS/XL battery exploding in a few weeks.

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there is always the option to not buy their stuff...after all, no one really needs it if they have the adapter and a previous ds.

 

A lot of people probably don't own a previous DS though. When i got my 3DS XL i owned a previous DS Lite, however the charger wasn't compatible anyway.

 

As most people probably don't purchase every incremental upgrade to a console Nintendo release i think its a very hard thing to justify doing, especially when Nintendo could use a standard Micro USB charger which the majority of people likely have, but don't.

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there is always the option to not buy their stuff...after all, no one really needs it if they have the adapter and a previous ds.

 

 

And parents who buy one for their kid for Xmas not really knowing much about games? Little Jennifer opens her Xmas present only to find its useless. Do Nintendo honestly think they only have customers with existing compatible adapters?

 

I have a 3DS XL which I wanted to trade in. EBGames doesn't accept, or offers less trade-in value for handhelds with no adapter. I also doubt that the value of the adapter is the same as buying a new one.

 

Put more simply: If I keep my adapter, EBGames will probably offer me significantly less value for my trade in, but if I trade in the adapter it won't be enough to cover the cost of a new adapter.

 

I know of no other company which does anything like this.

Not even Apple is so stupid to sell their phones without a charger.

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-------

 

The only alternative I can think of is to buy a USB charging cable for like $4 on eBay although idk how well they charge.

 

4.6v, 900mA is what the output of my charger is rated. I think USB 3.0 is 5 V, 900 mA so they should charge at about the same rate?

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-------

 

The only alternative I can think of is to buy a USB charging cable for like $4 on eBay although idk how well they charge.

 

4.6v, 900mA is what the output of my charger is rated. I think USB 3.0 is 5 V, 900 mA so they should charge at about the same rate?

I expect the DS to have internal regulating circuitry, so putting in 5V should be safe. Voltage is what matters - current is dependent upon the load (the DS). ie. connecting a 4.6V 9000mA [DC] power supply won't do any harm.

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you know, the first gameboys did not come with a power adapter, you could purchase one separately if you so choose.  I don't see a problem with having to purchase a adapter separately. 

 

I have had gameboys, turbografix express, and the sega gamegear (the last handheld video game system I ever owned)....  none came with adapters.

 

yeah and they did consume batteries like hot cakes...at least the Sega Gamegear since i owned one.

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They couldn't even at least include a 3DS USB charging cable?  Seems ridiculous to me.

 

 

As much as I love Nintendo, and I really do, they make bizarre decisions sometimes.

 

I get that they know they are popular and that there are plenty DS owners out there that can use their existing chargers, but if they want to exclude chargers then maybe they should have made their charges with a common adapter, you know, like mini or micro usb.  Creating a proprietary plug and then refusing to supply it is insane.

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