Soda causes cells to age as much as smoking


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Hum

Drink a 20-ounce soda daily, and you may be causing your cells to age as much as they would if you smoked, a study suggests. Researchers investigated DNA from 5,309 adults, focusing on telomeres, the caps on the ends of our cells' chromosomes, Time reports.

They found that drinking sugary soda was associated with shorter telomeres?and it's known that telomere length may be linked to life span, according to a University of California-San Francisco report.

Shorter telomeres also appear to be linked to heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. In the study, a daily 20-ounce soda was associated with an extra 4.6 years of aging?the same figure seen in smokers.

About 21 percent of subjects said they drank that much soda daily, while the average intake was 12 ounces. Researchers also looked at the effects of diet soda and fruit juice on telomeres; while "100 percent fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres," they write in the American Journal of Public Health, diet sodas and non-carbonated "sugar-sweetened beverages" weren't associated with telomere length.

Still, the study points to the dangers of soda beyond its role in obesity. "The extremely high dose of sugar that we can put into our body within seconds by drinking sugared beverages is uniquely toxic to metabolism," says a study author.

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Pam14160

. . . Oh Boy another one of those if you do this. . .you will die. . . :woot:

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Tidosho

. . . Oh Boy another one of those if you do this. . .you will die. . . :woot:

So true, Pam! The same "experts" and "scientists" that tell you something is good for you one minute then do a U Turn and tell you it's bad. You dunno who to trust these days....

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Hedon

Water is bad for you.

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Tidosho

Water is bad for you.

 

In a couple years, it'll cure cancer. Mark my words, the "scientists" are never wrong :P

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JustGeorge

Jupiter's ****! Is there nothing I can have?! *Shakes fist at sky*

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Hum

. . . Oh Boy another one of those if you do this. . .you will die. . . :woot:

Caution:  being born may lead to Death :ninja:

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vcfan

drinking soda  >  not aging 4.6 years   (Y)

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sanctified

So true, Pam! The same "experts" and "scientists" that tell you something is good for you one minute then do a U Turn and tell you it's bad. You dunno who to trust these days....

 

Well... can you point me to the papers and researches that tell us that soda is good please?

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Tidosho

Well... can you point me to the papers and researches that tell us that soda is good please?

 

My comment was a general one, not necessarily aimed at the soda. They always have a habit of saying something is bad/good for you, then soon afterward, reversing it.

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neufuse

Is this going to turn into one of those Eggs are horrible for you and will hurt your heart, then a decade later turn into why aren't you eating enough eggs they are good for you type studies?

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+Eternal Tempest

Link to study (had to go through a few links to get to the source of this article)

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/pdf/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302151

 

 

This following quote scream high fructose corn syrup. 

 

" diet sodas and non-carbonated "sugar-sweetened beverages" weren't associated with telomere length."

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