How do People Believe this Stuff?


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FloatingFatMan

Good Job insulting people who believe something that you don't!!!

 

As far as I'm concerned I don't have any facts to prove or disprove that these experiments took place and until I do I will hold my judgement. Could they have taken place? Yes. Did they take place? Who knows. Without the DoD declassifying documents regarding the experiments I guess we'll never know.

 

I suppose if I told you that the Nazis had a jet propelled flying wing that was almost invisible to radar you would completely dismiss it, would you?

 

 

One cannot insult a chickenhead.  One can only poke fun at them.

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robertwnielsen

lol. I think if you want to work in Area 51 you have to be an American citizen and go through a considerable vetting process. 

 

 

 

 

Probably correct. I am no expert on Area 51. But as I said earlier, there is no doubt it is a no-go-zone for the rest of us because they are developing the kind of technology they don't want anyone to get near. The Americans spend a tremendous amount of money developing their weaponry (a point which is worthy of debate) so there is no reason to believe they wouldn't have sites to develop and test it.

 

 

But, I am a good sceptic, if anyone provide evidence that there are alien craft or grey aliens (the most common alien cited by believers) being concealed by the American government I will change my opinion.

 

 

It's not about "knowing everything" it much more about how plausible such a thing is. The Phily experiment is a prime example of something that is entirely implausible and uncorroborated.

 

Well, according to this CNN article from 2013http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/15/us/area-51-documents/index.html, Area 51 was the test area for the U-2 spy plane, which performed many spy missions (including Francis Gary Powers' ill-fated mission, when he was shot down by a Soviet SA-2 missile and captured by the Soviets), but no mention is made of either the F-117A or B-2.

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WinMacLin Guy

I think you have to be skeptical about everything until you have some evidence. The problem with some (though not all) conspiracy theorists, at least from the ones I know, is that they quickly jump to the opposite extremes of the official explanation and they either fabricate evidence or get evidence from unreliable sources or they justify their position through ludicrous examples/logic.

 

On this topic, there is very little evidence for or against this event and such departments, thus it could have happened and there could be such departments but there could also not be. However, as some mentioned, with leaks happening all the time, surely someone from some agency would have said or leaked something about this project, thus because of this I would say that it is highly unlikely that such a department or project exists or ever existed. Also, in statistics when you do null hypothesis testing, you typically try to use your evidence to prove the status quo wrong (although there are flaws to this method and it is statistical so the method itself does not apply here, but I like the logic behind it), thus based on the logic there needs to be some evidence before we can assume that these projects existed (the status quo is that they do not exist).

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neo158

 

No, because physics.

I suggest you reread the original post a few times.

 

That's the one!

Really, Horton Ho-229. Jet propelled flying wing from WW2:

 

http://www.militaryfactory.com/aircraft/detail.asp?aircraft_id=105

 

and just to prove that it's almost invisible/almost undetectable to radar:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqgfjXaJxV8

 

Maybe you need to re read MY comment, nowhere do I state that those experiments ever took place. All I stated was that until there is proof either way then no one, not even you, knows. 

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NightScreams

Two, actually.. Though the second was dreadful...

 

IIRC, from books I've read over the years, there actually -was- an experiment on the USS Eldridge back in the 40's.  I think it was something to do with radar, which was very very new at the time.  It certainly wasn't anything to do with teleportation or invisibility or even radar jamming as the only people who had it were the UK (we invented it!), and our allies who we shared it with.

 

From what I recall reading, I think there was some kind of accident too, but really, nothing like the myths...

 

They were trying to create some kind of magnetic field to avoid magnetic detection of water surface mines (degaussing) but supposedly by going into this electro magnetic field it put them in hyperspace or something like that where they got lost due to the ships lack of ability to sustain itself. After a short period of time the ship returned with some passengers missing and the others were infused with the ship as if the ship became non physical for a second and they fell into where the walls and floors once were as the ship became physical again, infusing them into the walls and floors.

 

The other story was that it went invisible and the lost passengers reappeared in other time periods, one of which being 1983 where a further experiment called the Montauk Project designed to continue where the Philadelphia left off and during an exercise the 2 time periods coupled and that's how one of the passengers ended up in 1983.....or some such nonsense.

 

Officially, records show that the Eldridge was not commissioned that day and was at the NY harbor waiting to escort the naval convoy Casablanca. Carl Allen was the original story teller writing a few letters to astronomer Morris Jessep saying that he was on the SS andrew and saw the Eldridge disappear ....but he never had any proof. Years later Jessep committed suicide.

 

Up to today, there is no further evidence of any such outside of Carl's original claim nor any naval officer missing during that time period. In 1999, 15 members of the eldridge crew held a reunion in Atlantic City, with the veterans bemoaning the decades of questioning surrounding the vessel they served on. That's all that has ever been verified and likely everything else you read about the story has been made up from then on. Including the later Montauk Project

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