International Space Station (Updates)


 Share

Recommended Posts

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 14 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_041416_9

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 14 April 2016.                   NASA

 

Quote

The International Space Station will get a new module Saturday when the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is removed from the SpaceX Dragon and installed on the Tranquility module. BEAM will be attached to the station for two years of tests before expandable modules become a permanent feature of future spacecraft.

 

NASA and its international partners are using the station as an orbital laboratory to learn how the human body adapts to living and working in space. The wide variety of human research taking place on orbit today looked at work performance, vision, heart function, bones and muscles.

British astronaut Tim Peake explored how astronauts perform detailed, interactive tasks using a touchscreen tablet for the Fine Motor Skills experiment. He also joined Commander Tim Kopra for eye checks as scientists study how the lack of gravity affects vision. NASA astronaut Jeff Williams scanned his legs with an ultrasound device for the Sprint exercise study and helped search for gravity sensors in cells to prevent muscle atrophy in space.

 

Cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka researched heart function so doctors can understand how the cardiovascular system adapts during different phases of a spaceflight. Veteran cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko performed maintenance throughout the orbital lab's Russian segment. He swapped out GoPro batteries and photographed the condition Zvezda service module panels.

 

Quote

Dose Tracker: The crew configure the Dose Tracker app and completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crew members before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

 

Compound Specific Analyzer (CPA) Combustion Products (CP) Checkout: The crew checked out four newly resupplied CSA-CPs delivered on OA-6 including verification there was no sensor contamination. He then zero calibrated four monitors and deactivated all units. Following the checkout, deploy of two CSA-CPs in Node 1 (N1) and the Service Module (SM) was completed.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to position it and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to survey the Port Functional Cargo Block (FGB) Solar Array from four different positions. After completing the survey, controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to a park position.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 04/15: Ocular Health, CMS3 ops, SODF deploy, Smartcycler install, WHC urine receptacle R&R
Saturday, 04/16: Crew off duty, housekeeping
Sunday, 04/17: Crew off duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Override
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-14-april-2016.html

 

------------------------------

 

Earth from Space: Ireland

 

esa_earth_from_space_Irish_mosaic_041516

Earth from Space: Ireland                 ESA

 

Quote

The Sentinel-1A satellite takes us over to Ireland, in this multi-temporal colour composite of land coverage across the island. With a coastline of 7500 km, Ireland is home to some 4.8 million people and a wealth of history and tradition.

 

Stretching 486 km from north to south and 275 km across, Ireland is washed by abundant rainfall all year, coating the country in omnipresent emerald-green grasslands.

 

The coastal mountain fringes in the west, northwest and east are composed mainly of granite, while old red sandstone predominates in the south. Many lakes, large bog areas and low ridges make up the very scenic lowland, as seen throughout the image.

 

This image was stitched together from 16 radar scans by the satellite during May 2015, and gives us an idea of the island's land cover and use.

Different colours show changes that occurred within the 12 days' coverage.

 

The blues across the entire image represent strong changes in bodies of water or agricultural activities such as ploughing.

 

The yellows represent urban centres, with the capital city of Dublin very distinct on the far middle right. An interesting feature is the many yellow 'spots' scattered throughout the entire island, visible even more clearly when zooming in. These clusters all represent farmhouses.

 

Vegetated fields and forests appear in green. The reds and oranges represent unchanging features such as bare soil or possibly rocks that border the forests, as is clear on the left side of the image, along the tips of the island.

 

Sentinel-1A has been in orbit since 3 April 2014. It is a polar-orbiting, all-weather, day-and-night radar imaging mission for land and ocean services, monitoring the marine environment and mapping water and soil surfaces, among other major applications. Its sister, Sentinel-1B, is scheduled for launch on 22 April.

http://spaceref.com/earth/earth-from-space-ireland.html

 

-------------------------

 

BEAM Installation Work Begins Tonight

 

blog_beam_install.jpg

This computer rendering depicts the Canadarm2 robotic arm removing BEAM from the back of the Space X Dragon spacecraft.

 

Quote

BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, will be removed from the back of the SpaceX Dragon late tonight before installation on the Tranquility module begins early Saturday. Expansion of the new habitat module won’t occur until late May for two years of habitability tests.

 

Meanwhile, the six-member Expedition 47 crew kept up its very busy pace of advanced space research this week to benefit life on Earth and crews in space.

 

More eye checks were on the schedule today as scientists continued exploring vision changes astronauts have experienced while on orbit. The crew also observed skeletal muscle cells with a microscope to help researchers identify gravity sensors that may prevent muscle atrophy in space. Saliva samples were collected for a Japanese experiment analyzing how an astronaut’s immune system adapts to long-term space missions.

 

The crew set up software for an experiment recording an astronaut’s cognitive performance during stressful conditions in space. They also answered questions about their station habitat providing insights to engineers to help them design spacecraft to meet the needs of future crews.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/15/beam-installation-work-begins-tonight/

 

--------------------------

 

Bit off topic, but neat.......

 

Scrap dealer's NASA Lunar Rover prototype up for sale

 

Quote

This lunar rover prototype dating back to the 1960s is coming up for auction this week. Half a century ago it was a running vehicle, and it was driven by the famous rocket scientist Wernher von Braun. Developed by Brown Engineering for NASA, it was used for mobility tests and evaluations, before ending up for sale and bought by a scrap metal dealer.

 

Having been lost for decades, the Brown LSSM or Local Scientific Survey Module seen here has been confirmed authentic by Otha Vaughan, a member of von Braun's team. According to Vaughan's testimony the prototype, which ran on commercially available truck batteries, represented an important step in the design of the rovers used on the Apollo program. The closest it got to the moon was riding in the KC-135 Zero G experimental aircraft, to evaluate how it would behave in zero gravity.

 

Quote

After development carried on, NASA and auctioned off the LSSM prototype. Consequently, it spent decades sitting at a backyard in Alabama – a fall from grace after playing such a pivotal role in the space program. Later on, a US Air Force historian noticed the rover laying dormant and reported it to NASA. As it was believed to be eventually destroyed, the documents included with the prototype declare, "Since the LRV is no longer available for recovery, this matter is closed in the files of this office. No further action will occur." Currently the very much intact, although rusty, prototype remains in Tennessee.

 

It will be interesting to see what kind of price the LSSM will command as it goes under the hammer at the Space and Aviation auction by RR Auction, which begins tomorrow. Bidding is estimated at $125,000 - 150,000 despite its rough condition, and it remains to be seen whether it will be restored or left in the state in which it was found.

 

lunar-rover-prototype-4-876.jpg

original shape   NASA

 

lunar-rover-prototype-2-876.jpg

as it is now    RR Auction

 

lunar-rover-prototype-3--876.jpg

RR Auction

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2016/04/14/scrap-dealer-nasa-lunar-rover-prototype-up-for-sale/

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Expandable room installed on space station

 

CgJ0VznWwAAfODB.jpg-large.jpeg

Credit: NASA/Tim Kopra

 

Quote

The International Space Station’s robotic arm, under the control of engineers on Earth, extracted an experimental inflatable habitat from the trunk of SpaceX’s Dragon supply ship Saturday and attached it to the orbiting complex.

 

Made by Bigelow Aerospace, the new module will spend two years on the space station to prove the novel design’s worthiness for future commercial orbiting research labs and expeditions to deep space.

 

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM, flew to the space station inside a SpaceX Dragon cargo craft last week. The flight was arranged between Bigelow and NASA, which is paying the Las Vegas-based company $17.8 million for the project.

 

Unlike the space station’s other modules, which are made of metal alloys, BEAM is made of reinforced fabric designed to be resistant to radiation and bombardment by tiny flecks of space junk and micrometeoroids.

 

One of the BEAM project’s objectives is to verify the inflatable module concept can withstand the rigors of spaceflight.

 

Engineers sent commands to unlatch BEAM from its mooring inside Dragon’s unpressurized trunk early Saturday, and the 58-foot robot arm, nicknamed Canadarm 2, removed the 3,115-pound (1,413-kilogram) module from the SpaceX supply ship around 2:15 a.m. EDT (0615 GMT).

 

The robotic arm maneuvered BEAM, which measures about about 5.7 feet (1.7 meters) long and nearly 7.8 feet (2.4 meters) in diameter in its stowed configuration, to a berthing port on the aft side of the the space station’s Tranquility module.

 

Berthing was complete at 5:36 a.m. EDT (0936 GMT), according to NASA spokesperson Dan Huot.

 

The module will be inflated around May 26, expanding to four times its current volume until it reaches the approximate dimensions of a family-sized tent. Space station managers want to wait to inflate BEAM until the research complex and its crew are in a quiet period without arriving or departing spacecraft.

 

beam_berthed_to_iss_aft_port_node_3_conc

Artist’s concept of BEAM berthed to the International Space Station after its expansion. Credit: Bigelow Aerospace

 

Quote

The habitat is made of a Vectran-like material, according to Lisa Kauke, BEAM’s deputy program manager at Bigelow Aerospace. NASA used similar materials in the airbags that cushioned the landings of NASA’s Mars Pathfinder, Spirit and Opportunity rovers.

 

After the module is inflated, astronauts will enter the habitat to install sensors to monitor conditions inside the module, tracking temperatures, radiation levels, and impacts from tiny micrometeoroids and space junk, according to Rajib Dasgupta, technical integration manager for the BEAM demonstration at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

 

The inflation dynamics are an unknown, officials said.

 

Sensors mounted on both sides of the module’s interface with the space station will measure how the deployment works.

 

“This type of architecture has never been flown before,” Robert Bigelow, founder of Bigelow Aerospace, said before last week’s launch of BEAM. “It has been bound up for over a year waiting for launch. We’re not 100 percent sure of its behavior. It is a testing station. That is the whole point here, in all respects.”

 

Bigelow Aerospace launched two small inflatable satellites in 2006 and 2007. Those missions, dubbed Genesis 1 and 2, performed beyond expectations, Kauke said.

 

“What we learned from both of those programs is that the technology works, and we proved our materials and our assembly processes,” Kauke said.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/04/16/watch-live-expandable-room-to-be-installed-on-space-station-saturday/

 

-----------------------

 

BEAM Successfully Installed to the International Space Station

 

Screen-Shot-2016-04-16-at-8.06.42-AM-102

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM, is attached to the International Space Station early on April 16, 2016.

 

Quote

Following extraction from Dragon, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was installed to the International Space Station at 5:36 a.m. EDT.

 

At the time of installation, the space station was flying over the Southern Pacific Ocean. It will remain attached to station for two-year test period.

 

NASA is investigating concepts for habitats that can keep astronauts healthy during space exploration. Expandable habitats are one such concept under consideration – they require less payload volume on the rocket than traditional rigid structures, and expand after being deployed in space to provide additional room for astronauts to live and work inside.

 

BEAM will be the first test of such a module attached to the space station. It will allow investigators to gauge how well it performs overall, and how it protects against solar radiation, space debris and the temperature extremes of space.

 

In late May, BEAM will be filled with air and expanded to its full size. Astronauts will enter BEAM on an occasional basis to conduct tests to validate the module’s overall performance and the capability of expandable habitats.

 

After the testing period is completed, BEAM will be released from the space station to eventually burn up harmlessly in the Earth’s atmosphere.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/16/beam-successfully-installed-to-the-international-space-station/

 

------------------------

 

First human-rated Expandable Module installed on Space Station for two-year Test Run

 

Quote

With BEAM firmly attached to Node 3, the robotic arm was disconnected from the module to move to a park position while Mission Control started the task of placing a specific load on each of the CBM bolts.

 

Expansion of BEAM is currently expected in late May during a period of high Beta Angles when no visiting vehicles can arrive and depart the Space Station. This time frame was chosen given the crew has their hands full with the Cygnus and Dragon spacecraft currently berthed to the U.S. Segment and set for departure in mid May. Expansion will be completed in stages, starting with the crew manipulating the Pressure Equalization Valve on BEAM’s hatch to complete the initial expansion of the module. Inflation and pressurization of the module will be documented by external cameras and BEAM will remain dormant for one week before the crew will complete the ingress of the module.

 

During the first period of crew activity, the USOS crew members will install battery-powered sensors inside the module. Sensors installed on BEAM will include temperature, pressure and radiation sensors as well as instrumentation to document debris impacts. Outfitted with sensors, BEAM will remain mostly uninhabited by the crew, except for three or four ingresses per year to allow the crew to conduct internal surveys and collect sensor data.

 

At the end of its two-year stay at ISS, BEAM will be buttoned up and removed by the robotic arm to be released in a position below ISS. Orbital Mechanics will do the rest and quickly move BEAM away from ISS as its begins a steady descent towards the atmosphere given its relatively low mass and large surface allowing drag to rapidly lower its orbit.

 

Destructive re-entry of BEAM is expected one year after its departure from ISS.

http://spaceflight101.com/successful-beam-installation-on-iss/

 

----------------------

 

Expanding Possibilities Aboard The ISS

video is 4:26 min.

 

 

 

 

[ISS] Timelapse of BEAM Inflatable Module Installation

video is 3:11 min.

 

 

 

----------------------------

 

 

 

-----------------------

 

Cuba, Florida and the Bahamas As Seen From Orbit

 

oo25839549933.jpg

Cuba, Florida and the Bahamas            NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: I always try & catch this stunning view of Cuba, Florida and the Bahamas when we pass the Yucatan Basin.

http://spaceref.com/earth/cuba-florida-and-the-bahamas-as-seen-from-orbit.html

 

----------------------------

 

Orbital Sunrise

 

oo26414508546.jpg

Orbital Sunrise                   NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: Rise and shine - happy Friday everyone

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/orbital-sunrise.html

 

:)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

New Gear Readied for Advanced Space Science

 

Quote

The International Space Station crew is getting the orbital laboratory ready this week for a wide variety of advanced space science. The station also received a new module that will be expanded in late May for two years of habitability tests.

 

The Expedition 47 crew members are starting the work week setting up hardware for a pair of experiments exploring space physics and human research. A specialized microscope was configured for a study researching how particles behave at nanoscales potentially improving drug delivery and filtration technologies. After hardware checkouts and tests, the crew will also study the linkage between DNA alterations and weakened immune systems caused by long-term space missions.

 

Quote

The Electromagnetic Levitator, a facility that studies materials processing, will have a cable replaced and have its limit parameters reprogrammed. The Japanese Kibo laboratory module is being outfitted with new gear to extend its external research capability. The robotic installation work will enable payloads exposed to the vacuum of space to be moved and accessed with greater ease.

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, BEAM, was successfully installed Saturday morning. Ground controllers operated the Canadarm2 robotic arm and extracted BEAM from the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship and installed it to the Tranquility module.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/18/new-gear-readied-for-advanced-space-science/

 

--------------------------

 

The Real Everest Seen From Orbit

 

oo25876212454.jpg

Mt. Everest                      NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: The real thing: found Everest! Last picture turned out to be third-tallest mountain Kanchengjunga

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/the-real-everest-seen-from-orbit.html

 

----------------------

 

Orbital View of Mt Brandberg Nature Reserve in Nambia, Africa

 

oo26447145265.jpg

Mt Brandberg Nature Reserve                      NASA

 

Quote

This composite image of the Mt Brandberg Nature Reserve in Nambia, Africa was put together from several International Space Station images.

Expedition 47 crew members photographed the middle of a vast south African desert. Brandberg is Afrikaans, Dutch and German for Fire Mountain, which comes from its glowing color which is seen in the setting sun. Its highest point, the Königstein (German for 'King's Stone'), stands at 8,550 ft. above sea level and has spiritual significance to the native tribes in the area.

JSC2016e040690 (03/30/2016)

http://spaceref.com/earth/orbital-view-of-mt-brandberg-nature-reserve-in-nambia-africa.html

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 18 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_041816_9

Astronaut Tim Kopra tweeted this image of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module being transferred by the Canadarm2 robotic arm from the Space Dragon cargo craft to the Tranquility module for installation. Credit: @Astro_Tim/NASA.

 

Quote

The International Space Station crew is getting the orbital laboratory ready this week for a wide variety of advanced space science. The station also received a new module that will be expanded in late May for two years of habitability tests.

 

The Expedition 47 crew members are starting the work week setting up hardware for a pair of experiments exploring space physics and human research. A specialized microscope was configured for a study researching how particles behave at nanoscales potentially improving drug delivery and filtration technologies. After hardware checkouts and tests, the crew will also study the linkage between DNA alterations and weakened immune systems caused by long-term space missions.

 

The Electromagnetic Levitator, a facility that studies materials processing, will have a cable replaced and have its limit parameters reprogrammed. The Japanese Kibo laboratory module is being outfitted with new gear to extend its external research capability. The robotic installation work will enable payloads exposed to the vacuum of space to be moved and accessed with greater ease.

 

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, BEAM, was successfully installed Saturday morning. Ground controllers operated the Canadarm2 robotic arm and extracted BEAM from the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship and installed it to the Tranquility module.

 

Quote

Electromagnetic Levitator (EML) Preparation: The crew prepared the EML facility for the upcoming EML Batch 1 exercise. They installed and removed the EML reprogramming cable after the Limit Parameter Sets of the EML Sample Chamber were reprogrammed by ground teams. The crew also changed the measurement mode of the EML high speed camera. EML is designed for containerless materials processing in space. EML is a facility composed of 4 inserts installed in the European Drawer Rack (EDR). Samples are installed in a dedicated Sample Chamber that is attached to EML and will be replaced by new Sample Chambers for new experiment batches.

 

On Board Training (OBT) Crew Health Care System (CheCS) Drill: The 46S crew completed this OBT which provides the opportunity to review procedures, hardware and communication methods necessary to manage a medical emergency. Emergency medical equipment was deployed and the crew practicef CPR positioning to ensure familiarity with procedure execution.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) will walk off from the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) to Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF 1. The Mobile Transporter (MT) will be translated from Worksite (WS)6 to WS2 and the SSRMS will begin a survey of the clearances between the starboard Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The survey will confirm adequate clearance between the CETA cart and the SARJ when the MT is at WS1.

 

Orbital-6 (OA-6) Cargo Transfer Status: The crew has completed 19:35 hours of cargo transfer. Remaining time needed for completion is 32.51 hours.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
SAM/MPEP installation
MSS ops
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 04/19: EVA loop scrub, RR CASIS h/w gather, EMU 3011 install in launch enclosure, NanoRacks Module 51 status check
Wednesday, 04/20: SPHEROIDS download, RR Casis, Protein Crystal Growth, Fluid Shifts
Thursday, 04/21: JSSOD-M1 install Part 1, BEAM SSC deploy, ENERGY PFS setup

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Override
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-18-april-2016.html

 

----------------------

 

Crew Starts Work on Student-Designed Gene Experiment

 

blog_iss047e050514.jpg

Astronaut Tim Kopra sets up the station’s Microgravity Science Glovebox for experiment work. The glovebox is one of the major dedicated science facilities inside the Destiny laboratory module.

 

Quote

Human research and life science studies took precedence on the orbital laboratory today. The Expedition 47 crew also checked out a spacesuit and transferred cargo from a pair of resupply ships.

 

The Genes in Space study, a student-designed experiment, began on the station this morning. It is studying the linkage between DNA alterations and weakened immune systems caused by the lack of gravity. NASA encourages students to become future engineers and scientists to benefit Earth and promote exploration. As a result, students periodically design and interact with advanced research on the International Space Station.

 

The crew is also recording its observations of their living area on the space station for the Habitability study. The crew’s inputs may help engineers design future spacecraft with better accommodations for astronauts on long-term space missions.

 

The station’s inventory is being updated as the crew transfers gear back and forth from the Progress 63 and the SpaceX Dragon resupply ships. A U.S. spacesuit is also being readied for return to Earth on the Dragon when it departs the station and splashes down in the Pacific Ocean May 11.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/19/crew-starts-work-on-student-designed-gene-experiment/

 

-------------------

 

Smoking Russian Volcano Seen From Space

 

oo25902241823.jpg

Russian Volcano                 NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Spotted volcano smoking away on Russia's far east coast this morning - heat has melted snow around top. Credits: ESA/NASA

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/smoking-russian-volcano-seen-from-space.html

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ISS Daily Summary Report – 04/19/16

 

Quote

NanoRacks Module-51: The crew documented the first of several statuses for the sub-experiments inside NanoRacks Module-51. A status will be provided consecutively for the next three weeks.The four different investigations within the module study: antibiotic use to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria; the rate at which yeast decomposes organic matter; whether steroid-enhanced plants could grow better in space than on Earth; and whether an enzyme derived from fireflies can cause bioluminescence in microgravity.

 

Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Session: The crew retrieved samples from the MELFI and completed a brief overview of procedures. They then began the Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler validation ops by processing a quality control sample to verify that the SmartCycler operates as expected in microgravity. Wetlab RNA SmartCycler is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the ISS. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space.

 

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3011: A successful loop scrub was performed on EMU 3011 after which the suit was packed in the launch enclosure for return on SpX-8. The suit was last used during the SSU R&R in January 2016 when water was reported in the helmet.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last night, Robotics Ground Controllers operated the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to walkoff from the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF1.  The SSRMS was then maneuvered to a translate configuration and the Mobile Transporter (MT) was translated from Worksite (WS) #6 to WS2.  Next, the SSRMS was maneuvered to the first position for the Starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart Clearance Survey near WS1 and the survey at this position was performed.  The SSRMS was maneuvered to the second position for the SARJ to CETA Cart Clearance Survey and this survey was also completed.  The third and final operations were performed today to survey the Starboard SARJ for clearance analysis of the MT translation path to WS1 for the HTV-6 battery task.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

MSS operations

Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:

Wednesday, 04/20: SPHEROIDS download, RR Casis, Protein Crystal Growth, Fluid Shifts

Thursday, 04/21: JSSOD-M1 install Part 1, BEAM SSC deploy, ENERGY PFS setup

Friday, 04/22: SPRINT VO2, ENERGY PFS ops, Protein Crystal Growth, BCAT

 

QUICK ISS Status – Environmental Control Group:

                              Component

Status

Elektron

On

Vozdukh

Manual

[СКВ] 1 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV1”)

On

[СКВ] 2 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV2”)

Off

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab

Override

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3

Operate

Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab

Idle

Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3

Operate

Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA)

Process

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)

Standby

Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab

Off

Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3

Full Up

// paste issue today....

https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2016/04/19/iss-daily-summary-report-041916/

 

------------------------

 

15 Years of Europe on the International Space Station

 

ooAstronaut_Umberto_Guidoni.jpg

Umberto Guidoni                   ESA

 

Quote

On 23 April 2001, Italian ESA Umberto Guidoni made history as the first European astronaut to board the International Space Station.

 

Guidoni had been launched on four days earlier, on 19 April, on Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of its seven-strong STS-100 crew from Kennedy Space Centre, with a liftoff at 20:41 CEST.

 

The 11-day STS-100 mission was the ninth Shuttle visit to the Space Station and would feature two space walks. The Shuttle docked with the International Space Station some 260 km above Earth on 21 April. The hatches between Endeavour and the Space Station were opened another two days later, on 23 April, allowing the Shuttle crew and Station occupants to greet one another for the first time.

 

Guidoni and his six colleagues were delivering elements and equipment required for the ongoing assembly of the International Space Station. In particular, the Shuttle carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), provided by the Italian space agency ASI, as well as the Space Station Remote Manipulator System, the Canadian robotic arm that would be used extensively to assemble the Space Station over the coming years.

 

Guidoni's specific role on STS-100 was as 'loadmaster' in charge of MPLM logistical operations, overseeing the activation and deactivation of Raffaello and, in a backup role, helping to operate the Shuttle's robotic arm during the spacewalks.

 

Endeavour also boosted the Space Station's altitude and performed a fly-around survey of the Station, including recording views with an IMAX camera in the Shuttle's cargo bay. All objectives were completed without incident, and the Shuttle returned safely to Earth on 1 May 2001. During this mission, astronaut Chris Hadfield made the first spacewalk by a Canadian.

 

Since Guidoni's flight, there have been another 16 Europeans staying for a cumulative total of over 1400 days on the orbiting outpost.

 

ESA astronaut Roberto Vittori (IT) became the first European to make second and third visits to the Station. Frank De Winne (BE), Andr Kuipers (NL), Paolo Nespoli (IT) and Christer Fuglesang (SE) have all made second visits.

 

The first ESA astronaut to stay on board in an expedition was Thomas Reiter (DE) in 2006. Tim Peake (GB) is currently serving on a six-month long-duration mission.

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/15-years-of-europe-on-the-international-space-station.html

 

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/15_years_of_Europe_on_the_International_Space_Station_999.html

 

------------------------

 

France As Seen From The International Space Station

 

oo26476638481.jpg

France                  NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: Weather's picking up over Europe at last...still a few weeks left for some pics!

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/france-as-seen-from-the-international-space-station.html

 

----------------------------

 

Crew Tests How Cells, Bones and Muscles Respond to Lack of Gravity

 

blog_iss047e050582.jpg

Expedition 47 crew members Tim Peake and Alexey Ovchinin are the 221st and 222nd individuals to visit the International Space Station.

 

Quote

The Expedition 47 crew is researching how plants sense gravity today and exploring how fluids shift in an astronaut’s body. The orbital residents are also learning how living in space affects the structure of bones and muscles.

 

The crew set up botany gear and collected samples for the Plant Gravity Sensing-3 experiment. The study seeks to determine if plants sense gravity and if the concentration of calcium in their cells change.

 

Fluids in an astronaut’s cells and blood vessels respond to the lack of gravity and can impact brain pressure and potentially affect vision. Scientists on the ground are researching this phenomenon by analyzing blood, saliva and urine samples collected from astronauts while on orbit.

 

Lack of gravity also weakens bones and muscles, and scientists are testing an antibody that has been effective on Earth to prevent that weakening. Doctors are observing those muscular and skeletal changes in mice to learn how to prevent muscle and bone atrophy in astronauts.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/20/crew-tests-how-cells-bones-and-muscles-respond-to-lack-of-gravity/

 

----------------------------

 

In other news....

 

Chinese scientists develop mammal embryos in space for first time

 

mouse-embryos-4-hours-before-launched-in

Photo provided by the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, shows the mouse embryos four hours before they are launched into space by the satellite, SJ-10. Over 6,000 early-stage mouse embryos carried by China's retrievable scientific research satellite have developed in space, making it the world's first-ever successful test on mammal embryo development. Image courtesy Xinhua.

 

Quote

Chinese scientists on Sunday said they have successfully developed early-stage mouse embryos in space for the first time on a retrievable microgravity satellite set to return to Earth sometime next week.

 

The SJ-10 research probe, launched on April 6, carried over 6,000 mouse embryos in a self-sufficient chamber the size of a microwave oven, according to Duan Enkui, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Among them, 600 embryos were put under a high-resolution camera, which took pictures every four hours for four days and sent them back to Earth.

 

The pictures showed that the embryos developed from the 2-cell stage, an early-on embryonic cleavage stage, to blastocyst, the stage where noticeable cell differentiation occurs, around 72 hours after SJ-10's launch, Duan said. The timing was largely in line with embryonic development on Earth, he added.

 

The rest of the embryos loaded on the satellite were injected with fixatives at 72 hours after the launch for studies on the effects of space environment on embryonic development, according to Duan.

 

This is the first reported successful development in mammalian embryos in space in human history. Scientists will compare the retrieved embryos with samples on Earth and perform further analyses on the profiles of early embryo development in space, once SJ-10 returns home.

 

SJ-10 is expected to land in a designated spot in Siziwang Banner in Inner Mongolia sometime next week. Earlier reports said the probe as a whole had a designed life of just 15 days.

 

The bullet-shaped probe is said to be housing a total of 19 experiments involving microgravity fluid physics, microgravity combustion, space material, space radiation effects, microgravity biological effects and space bio-technology.

 

These include one studying how space radiation affects the genetic stability of fruit flies and rat cells, and a combustion experiment which will test how materials used in spacecraft burn in space to find ways of making safer capsules for future manned missions.

 

An experiment being run in partnership between the National Space Science Center under the CAS and the European Space Agency will investigate the behavior of crude oil under high pressure, and also on board is equipment to test coal combustion and pollutant formation under microgravity.

The former experiment is aimed at improving scientists' understanding of oil reservoirs buried deep underground, while the latter is expected to help enhance energy efficiency and cut emissions on Earth.

 

In a separate development, retrievers for the SJ-10 satellite on Sunday said they will deploy four helicopters to aid ground vehicles in the search for the satellite after its landing next week.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Chinese_scientists_develop_mammal_embryos_in_space_for_first_time_999.html

 

Good work....:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA ISS Space to Ground Weekly Report - 22 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_weekly_weekly_space_to_ground_0

NASA ISS Space to Ground Weekly Report - 22 April 2016.             NASA

 

Quote

NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-iss-space-to-ground-weekly-report---22-april-2016.html

 

Space to Ground: BEAM Me Up Scotty!: 04/22/2016

video is 2:00 min.

 

 

--------------------------

 

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 21 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_0421016_

NASA astronaut Tim Kopra prepares a U.S. Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit for cooling loop maintenance. Spacesuits on-board the International Space Station get routine maintenance between spacewalks. Credit: NASA.

 

Quote

The International Space Station residents were back at work today continuing this week's slate of life science experiments. The ongoing biomedical space research helps scientists understand how living in space long term affects astronauts. Results and observations have the potential to benefit future crews and citizens on Earth.

 

The new Genes in Space student experiment launched aboard the new SpaceX Dragon cargo craft began operations this week. The research is studying the link between DNA alterations and weakened immune systems caused by the lack of gravity.

 

The crew began WetLab-2 validation operations this week. WetLab-2 is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the space station. It will allow scientists and crew members to accelerate the pace of research aboard the orbiting laboratory while saving time and cost.

 

Exercise is necessary to counter the muscle and bone loss associated with long-term space missions. Doctors are exploring high intensity, low volume space exercise techniques to prevent this loss as NASA plans human journeys beyond low-Earth orbit. The Sprint study, with operations set to begin this weekend, allows doctors to observe an astronaut's skeletomuscular and cardiovascular system during an exercise session.

 

Hardware and sensors are being attached to crew members this week and will give scientists insights into an astronaut's energy usage and metabolic rate. The 10-day experiment will provide an assessment of the energy requirements necessary to support an astronaut on a mission farther out into space.

 

Quote

MAGVECTOR: Crewmembers configured the portable power supply and connected the universal serial bus (USB) jump drive to the MAGVECTOR in preparation for automatic data transfer that began immediately after activation. MAGVECTOR investigates how Earth's magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future ISS experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Air Selector Valve (ASV) 104 Remove & Replace (R&R): From January 21 to February 4, 2016, the Lab CDRA valve 104 failed to reach its commanded position on numerous occasions. Data indicates that the valve stalled in the intermediate position and repeatedly had slow transition times as well as frequent position dropouts resulting in CDRA shutdowns. Today the crew R&Rd the valve with one of two spares available on orbit and ground teams successfully commanded to the valve. The CDRA has been activated for a 24-hour checkout period.

 

Robotics Operations: Yesterday Robotics ground controllers successfully performed a FMS (Force Moment Sensor) characterization on LEE B, then picked up the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to prepare for the HTV-6 battery get-ahead tasks to break torque and retorque bolts on S4 batteries that are planned for replacement with Lithium Ion batteries. When ORU Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM #1) attempted to grasp the Robotic Offset Tool (ROST) to set up for the get-aheads, the OTCM stopped short of the expected gripper close range and was not able to perform the grasp. A second attempt was unsuccessful. The remainder of robotic operations for the day were postponed. Teams are meeting to discuss the anomaly and a forward plan.

 

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) O2 Repress: Today the first O2 repress of the ISS cabin atmosphere was performed using O2 from the NORS tank. When the NORS tank is empty, it will be returned to ground for reflight.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

JEMAL ops
NORS O2 repress
Nominal ground commanding


Three-Day Look Ahead:

Friday, 04/22: SPRINT VO2, ENERGY, Protein Crystal Growth, BCAT, Smart Cycler
Saturday, 04/23: Crew off duty, housekeeping, ENERGY
Sunday, 04/24: Crew off duty, FE-6 runs the London Marathon on T2

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Operate
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Start Up
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-21-april-2016.html

 

-------------------------

 

Sometimes It Is Purple in Space #Prince

 

oo26480571421.jpg

Orbital Sunrise             NASA

 

Quote

Morning breaks for astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station.

SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft sits on the left side of frame, attached to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module. Taken 17 April 2016. ISS047e066509 (04/17/2016)

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/sometimes-it-is-purple-in-space-prince.html

 

----------------------

 

Research Promotes Astronaut Health for Long-Term Missions

 

blog_iss047e066248.jpg

Expedition 47 flight engineer Jeff Williams works on the WetLab-2 gene research hardware.

 

Quote

The International Space Station residents were back at work today continuing this week’s slate of life science experiments. The ongoing biomedical space research helps scientists understand how living in space long term affects astronauts. Results and observations have the potential to benefit future crews and citizens on Earth.

 

The new Genes in Space student experiment launched aboard the new SpaceX Dragon cargo craft began operations this week. The research is studying the link between DNA alterations and weakened immune systems caused by the lack of gravity.

 

The crew began WetLab-2 validation operations this week. WetLab-2 is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the space station. It will allow scientists and crew members to accelerate the pace of research aboard the orbiting laboratory while saving time and cost.

 

Exercise is necessary to counter the muscle and bone loss associated with long-term space missions. Doctors are exploring high intensity, low volume space exercise techniques to prevent this loss as NASA plans human journeys beyond low-Earth orbit. The Sprint study, with operations set to begin this weekend, allows doctors to observe an astronaut’s skeletomuscular and cardiovascular system during an exercise session.

 

Hardware and sensors are being attached to crew members this week and will give scientists insights into an astronaut’s energy usage and metabolic rate. The 10-day experiment will provide an assessment of the energy requirements necessary to support an astronaut on a mission farther out into space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/21/research-promotes-astronaut-health-for-long-term-missions/

 

------------------------

 

Science in Short: ARTE

 

iss047e038954-1024x682.jpg

NASA astronaut Tim Kopra installed the Thermal Exchange hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox. Credits: NASA

 

Quote

Our small devices have to dump a lot of heat from their electronics, if you have been sitting with your laptop on your lap wondering why it is getting so hot, you might also be interested in future improvements being sought through research on the International Space Station. Heat pipes are used to cool things like laptop computers and rely on an interface between liquid and gas phases in a liquid, plus capillary flow to return the cooled liquid back to the heated end.

 

Previous research on the space station discovered inefficiencies in heat pipes and other research identified the new fundamental equations for capillary flow from research done on the orbiting laboratory. During the first week of April, and experiment called Advanced Research Thermal Passive Exchange (ARTE) , one of a number of new experiments testing this new knowledge to get practical applications, was completed on the space station. The Thermal Exchange hardware performed a series of powered test runs within the microgravity science glovebox to determine the impact of using various working fluids and different groove shapes on capillary action for heat pipes operating in a microgravity environment.

 

The data collected will be used to further understand and validate numerical modelling of heat pipe behavior in microgravity, which can then be used to develop more passive and reliable thermal control systems for future exploration. This particular experiment was sponsored by the Italian Space Agency, and was led by scientists from DIMEAS – Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, I Facoltà di Ingegneria, Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy; related investigations testing various aspects of capillary flow and heat transfer are coming in the next few years, including some sponsored by CASIS as part of the ISS National Laboratory, and some sponsored by NASA.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/2016/04/22/science-in-short-arte/

 

--------------------------

 

US-Russia Space Projects Set Example of Good Cooperation

 

sergei-krikalev-300-lg.jpg

Sergei Krikalev, who is the executive director for Roscosmos manned programs, noted that Moscow and Washington had continued to implement existing projects, while also maintaining talks on new ventures.

 

Quote

Russian cosmonaut and the executive director for Roscosmos manned programs Sergei Krikalev told Sputnik that the space cooperation between Moscow and Washington was a vivid example of the countries' partnership.

 

The current space cooperation between Russia and the United States sets an example of how the two countries should work together, a Russian cosmonaut and senior official at the space agency Roscosmos, Sergei Krikalev, told Sputnik.

 

"Despite any political issues between Russia and the United States, the space cooperation continues, and the current cooperation is a good example of how we should collaborate, because the space collaboration is important and it should be systematic," Krikalev stated.

 

Krikalev, who is the executive director for Roscosmos manned programs, noted that Moscow and Washington had continued to implement existing projects, while also maintaining talks on new ventures.

 

"First, the project of the International Space Station is being discussed and implemented. The program is changing, and it is expanding," he said. "Besides, the future projects are being discussed, including flights beyond low-earth orbit, flights to the vicinity of the moon, possible missions with the landing on the moon, first with automated machines and then with man-operated machines," Krikalev said.

 

The cosmonaut added that all these projects were part of a wider international agenda discussed with US, European and Japanese partners.

 

Krikalev is currently in Washington where he met with top NASA officials. On Tuesday, Russia presented a bronze bust of the world's first cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/US_Russia_Space_Projects_Set_Example_of_Good_Cooperation_999.html

 

---------------------------

 

Russia, US discuss boosting efficiency of cooperation at ISS

 

Quote

The deputy head of the Russian Federal Space Agency said that Russia and the United States discussed the possibility of increasing the efficiency of cooperation at ISS.

 

Russia and the United States discussed the possibility of increasing the efficiency of cooperation at the International Space Station (ISS), including the need to optimize the docking standards, Sergei Savelyev, the deputy head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), said Wednesday.

 

"[The sides] discussed issues aimed at improving the efficiency of cooperation at the ISS, first of all, and future joint projects," Savelyev told reporters following talks with the management of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

 

Russian and US representatives have agreed in particular to promote the activities of the joint working groups, he added.

 

"This concerns the optimization of the docking standards and others to approach the prospect of joint work on the lunar orbit," Savelyev explained.

 

A single docking interface is needed so that any ship could dock with the station, in particular, taking into account that over several years new US space ships will be built, he specified.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_US_discuss_boosting_efficiency_of_cooperation_at_ISS_999.html

 

--------------------------

 

'A Beautiful Planet': Film Shows Earth from Space in IMAX 3D (Gallery)

 

16 image slideshow

http://www.space.com/32628-a-beautiful-planet-imax-film-pictures.html

 

-------------------------

 

London Array Wind Farm
United Kingdom

 

Quote

In the Thames Estuary, 175 wind turbines make up the London Array—the world’s largest offshore wind farm. The turbines range from 85—100 meters in height and collectively generate 2,500 GWh annually.

 

london-array-web.jpg

Planet Labs Inc.

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/london-array/

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slow night, so I thought I would throw up some misc stuff for entertainment value....

 

Some will remember this image.....it has been copied in many forms on various media....

 

2arQnA0.jpg

Anna Lee Fisher, NASA astronaut

 

Quote

Anna Lee Tingle Fisher (née Sims)[1] (born August 24, 1949) is an American chemist, emergency physician, and a NASA astronaut. Formerly married to fellow astronaut Bill Fisher, and the mother of two children, in 1984 she became the first mother in space.[2] Fisher is the oldest active American astronaut.[3] During her career at NASA, she has been involved with three major programs: the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station and the Orion project.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Lee_Fisher

 

The strange thing...finding who took the image and when, it was not the 1985 Time magazine cover, as some have claimed, and was refuted by Time magazine as not their work. It was late 1978 to early 1980 with a lot of unproven claims...but it still stands as a "classic" which has been copied many times...I think it is outstanding.  :D 

 

--------------------------

 

Misc BEAM data....inflation questions....

 

Quote

Originally, the module was supposed to inflate using an onboard air tank, with the station's supply serving as a backup. NASA opted to reverse the process, and will now use an equalization valve to slowly bleed station air into the module at a slower, more controlled rate. The final pressurization will still be achieved using BEAM's onboard air tank. The entire process should take about 45 minutes—the daylight portion of a single orbit. The expansion is manually controlled; astronaut Tim Kopra will likely oversee the process.

 

BEAM contains a suite of sensors to collect four data sets. Some come pre-installed, while others will be placed by astronauts upon first entering the module. The loads imparted from BEAM to the ISS will be measured, including during the expansion process. There are also sensors to detect micrometeorite and space debris impacts, along with radiation monitors and temperature sensors.

 

BEAM doesn't actually do much after inflation; it mostly just sits there and collects data. It won't be used in an operational capacity for storage or living space. The crew is expected to go inside two or three times during a typical six-month Expedition increment, taking a couple hours to collect data. When the crew isn't inside, the hatch stays closed, though station air will continue circulating in and out of the unit.

 

The module will stay attached for two years. It's certified for five, but NASA plans to use that ISS port for other technology demonstrations (there are no official plans yet). After BEAM is jettisoned, it will spend about 290 days in space before tumbling back into the atmosphere.

 

Some BEAM specifics are proprietary. During the conference call, Lisa Kauke said she couldn't reveal the composition of the wall material, or even how thick the module was. There is, apparently, no peer-reviewed data beyond NASA on how well the module can withstand debris strikes. In fact, when asked what would happen if the module was punctured, NASA's answer was clear: that won't happen.

 

"Basically, nothing is going to happen," Rajib Dasgupta said. "BEAM has a very robust debris protection layer within its shell. Debris will not penetrate the structural layer of BEAM—we have tested it extensively. BEAM actually can resist space debris and micrometeorite orbital debris to the same extent that any other ISS module can."

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2016/20160405-beam-preview.html?referrer=https://www.reddit.com/r/bigelowaerospace/comments/4dj050/questions_about_beam_inflation/

 

-------------------------

 

Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL)

 

This is about 2 years behind, but now scheduled for launch in August 2017...which may put this on SpaceX CRS-13.

 

Quote

On a sun-drenched hill in Southern California's San Gabriel Mountains, researchers are making progress on an experimental facility that could create the coldest known place in the universe.


The Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, will probe the wonders of quantum physics when it launches to the International Space Station. The CAL facility recently hit a milestone of making an ultra-cold quantum gas with potassium, a high-tech feat that puts it on track for launch next year. The planned flight to space is in August 2017.


"Studying gases that have been cooled down to extreme temperatures is key to understanding how complexity arises in the universe, and allows us to test the fundamental laws of physics in a whole new way," said Robert Thompson, project scientist for the Cold Atom Laboratory at JPL.


Researchers with CAL are interested in a state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate, which happens when all the atoms in a very cold gas have the same energy levels. Like dancers in a chorus line, the atoms become synchronized and behave like one continuous wave instead of discrete particles.


On Earth, gravity limits how long scientists can study Bose-Einstein condensates because this form of matter falls to the bottom of any apparatus used to study it. In microgravity, such condensates can be observed for longer periods of time. This would allow scientists to better understand the properties of particles in this state and their uses for tests of fundamental physics. Ultra-cold atoms in microgravity may also be key to a wide variety of advanced quantum sensors, and exquisitely sensitive measurements of quantities such as gravity, rotations and magnetic fields.


Using lasers, magnetic traps and an electromagnetic "knife" to remove warm particles, CAL will take atoms down to the coldest temperatures ever achieved.

http://phys.org/news/2016-03-cold-atom-laboratory-cool.html

 

These are experiments at the macroscopic scale, not atomic scales. This is where we see superfluidity and superconductivity. Being on the ISS, gravity will be removed, for the most part, and experiment viewing times drastically increased. We should see a lot of new behaviours with this experient.

 

------------------------

 

And while on this subject of cold....

 

The Top 5 coldest places in the universe

 

Quote

Here are some the coldest places scientists have ever studied.

ANTARCTICA: -94.7 C

Just to put things into perspective, the coldest air temperature ever recorded on our planet Earth is -89.2 C at Russia’s Vostok Station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983. However, even this record might have unofficially been broken in August 2010, when a NASA Earth observation satellite recorded that east Antarctica one day hit a mind-numbing temperature of -94.7 C. But this won’t make it into the Guinness Book of World Records because the measurements weren’t made with thermometers.

PLUTO: -229 C

When looking at our neighbouring worlds in the solar system, the planets farthest from our sun sport some of the coldest temperatures. And taking the prize as the coldest is little old Pluto. On average, it is estimated that on this frozen world’s surface it can go down to -229 C.

Recently demoted to dwarf planet status, Pluto – which is about two-thirds the diameter of Earth’s moon – just doesn’t have the internal temperatures like other planets in our solar system to generate any heat.

THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: -240 C

First it was booted out of the major planet club, and now it seems Pluto has even lost the record for the coldest place in the solar system. As of 2009, research shows that the title now goes to permanently shadowed craters on the south pole of Earth’s own moon.

At the bottom of some craters, where the sun never gets to shine due to tall cliffs along their rims that block light, it can stay a constant -240 C. Believe it or not, that’s about 10 degrees colder than Pluto!

NASA is looking at these dark craters as possible sites for water ice reservoirs that could be exploited by future lunar bases.

THE BOOMERANG NEBULA: -272 C

Looking beyond our solar system, the coldest natural place in the universe we have found so far turns out to be within our very own Milky Way galaxy. A weird-looking cosmic cloud known as the Boomerang Nebula, a gaseous remnant of a dying star, takes the prize.

Sitting about 5,000 light years from Earth, the Boomerang was discovered recently to have all the previous cosmic destinations beat, clocking in at -272 C. That is only 1.1 C warmer than absolute zero – the coldest possible temperature according to the laws of physics. At absolute zero all thermal activity of atoms theoretically comes to a complete halt.

THE COLD ATOM LAB: −273.15

The very coldest place in the known Universe will soon be beaten – not in a distant, far-off galaxy or space between the stars, but in a small spot in Earth’s orbit on the International Space Station.

NASA researchers are planning to create the very coldest spot in the entire universe in the Cold Atom Lab, an atomic refrigerator launching next year. This experiment will allow physicists to study quantum mechanics – the strange rules that govern light and matter at atomic scales – like never before.

By letting the temperatures in this device fall to within 100 pico-Kelvin or 100-trillionth of a degree above absolute zero, this device will produce temperatures colder than anything we have found even in nature.

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/geekquinox/top-5-coldest-places-in-the-universe-153738476.html

 

The above are just examples, as the universe contains billions of galaxies that we have not investigated. The surprising thing, is that we have a very cold body source on the moon's poles, where some craters never receive sunlight. Another reason for a moon base which can exploit this property for various activities, including low resistance applications.

 

Boomerang Nebula

 

Quote

The Boomerang Nebula is a protoplanetary nebula[2] located 5,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. It is also known as the Bow Tie Nebula and catalogued as PGC 3074547. The nebula's temperature is measured at 1 K (−272.15 °C; −457.87 °F) making it the coolest natural place currently known in the Universe.[3]

The Boomerang Nebula is believed to be a star system evolving toward the planetary nebula phase. It continues to form and develop due to the outflow of gas from its core where a star in its late stage life sheds mass and emits starlight illuminating dust in the nebula. Millimeter scale dust grains mask portions of the nebula's center so most escaping visible light is in two opposing lobes forming a distinctive hourglass shape as viewed from Earth. The outflowing gas is moving outwards at a speed of about 164 km/s and expanding rapidly as it moves out into space; this gas expansion results in the nebula's unusually low temperature.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boomerang_Nebula

 

Boomerang_HST_big.jpg

This Hubble image was recorded using polarizing filters (analogous to polarized sunglasses) and color-coded by the angle associated with the polarized light.

 

:D

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

love this kind of stuff. The niggling little detail-oriented studies that most Scientists and Engineers don't like bothering with because it's boring? I'll do it all day with a smile on my face. It's all extremely interesting to me, and very important in the grand scheme of things in their own ways. :yes: 

 

So yeah; some might prefer the "big and heavy" tasks (building Rockets and stuff like that) ... and that's great. I like it too. But the Science and Engineering concerning the smaller things; the necessary things that make life in space easier/better/more convenient? I'm all over that, because it helps everyone.

 

When future Astronauts can simply reach over, grab an item of convenience or necessity with nary a thought about said item (like our remote controls) or the activity in question, and it takes but a few seconds to a minute or two (when before it was impossible or it took a long time) -- and one of US was responsible for that item (or items) and the procedure that made that activity possible --  Then we've done our job and our mark is forever embedded into Space Exploration. We're immortalized, in a way. 

 

That's one of the reasons I want to be an Engineer and get into the Sciences -- because I want to make the lives of the Astronauts and potential Colonists easier, any way I can. :) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

 

ESA astronaut Tim Peake achieves Guinness World Records title for the Fastest marathon in space

 

Guinness World Records can confirm that ESA Astronaut Tim Peake has achieved a brand new Guinness World Records title for the Fastest marathon in orbit, running the Digital Virgin Money London Marathon 400km above earth on-board the International Space Station in 3:35.21.

 

Guinness World Records’ Head of Records Marco Frigatti adjudicated Peake’s attempt via live video link at the European Astronaut Centre of ESA in Cologne. The record for the fastest marathon in orbit by a female is held by Sunita Williams, who ran in a time of 4:24 on 16 April 2007.

 

 

Guinness World Records

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gene Analysis System Could Accelerate Pace of Research on the Space Station

 

ooacd15-0066-003_0.jpg

WetLab-2 Sample Prep Module                NASA

 

Quote

Biologists around the world routinely perform gene expression analysis to better understand living systems.

 

Gene expression analysis examines the types and amounts of molecules produced by genes in living cells, telling us which genes are active and which are inactive at a given point in time. This reveals valuable information about the highly dynamic internal states of cells in living systems.

 

NASA's WetLab-2 hardware system is bringing to the International Space Station the technology to measure gene expression of biological specimens in space, and to transmit the results to researchers on Earth at the speed of light.

 

"WetLab-2 is truly a first," said Macarena Parra, WetLab-2 project scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley. "Investigators using WetLab-2 will be able to analyze the first run of a spaceflight experiment and immediately apply what they learn to subsequent runs of the experiment during the same flight mission. It will allow us to accelerate the pace of research on the station while saving time and cost."

 

Currently, life science research aboard the space station must follow pre-set plans: A rocket carries the experiment into space, an astronaut follows the plan and then sends samples to Earth for analysis. If the post-flight analysis shows that something unusual or unpredicted occurred in space, the researcher will want to further study those phenomena, but this requires planning an entirely new experiment and waiting for an opportunity to fly it to the station.

 

Quote

"The ultimate goal of the WetLab-2 system is to help humans live and work in space," said Schonfeld. "This system will help researchers identify changes in gene expression. This can help us determine how to mitigate negative effects of spaceflight and add to our knowledge about how genes work."

 

The WetLab-2 system was developed at Ames and funded by the International Space Station Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

 

WetLab-2 launched April 8 aboard the eighth SpaceX cargo resupply mission to the space station. The goal of the first flight is to validate system performance. After successful completion of the validation study, WetLab-2 will be available to speed delivery of gene expression data to principal investigators on Earth for academic, commercial and NASA research.

http://spaceref.com/nasa-hack-space/gene-analysis-system-could-accelerate-pace-of-research-on-the-space-station.html

 

 

WetLab-2

Quantitative PCR tools for spaceflight studies of gene expression aboard the International Space Station

 

Quote

Components of the WetLab-2 system include a commercial quantitative PCR instrument (Cepheid SmartCycler), a sample transfer tool for retrieving samples from culturing hardware; and a set of fluidic modules to facilitate sample preparation work that will be done by astronaut crew working in a weightless environment.

 

Fluidic modules include: the sample processing module that is designed to lyse cells and extract RNA; the reaction assembly module that removes air bubbles from fluids and transfers liquid samples into PCR reaction tubes; and PCR reaction tubes that are pre-loaded with stabilized lyophilized reagents and fitted with specialized caps for use in microgravity.

 

The SmartCycler can perform up to 16 quantitative PCR reactions in parallel, using up to four optical channels to measure fluorescence. The average time to deliver results is less than four hours.

 

WetLab-2 is being developed at NASA's Ames Research Center by the Engineering Directorate under the leadership of the Ames International Space Center Utilization Office. Science direction is provided by the Space Biosciences Division at Ames and the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division at NASA Headquaters. Project funding is provided by the International Space Station Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston.

acd15-0066-003.jpg?itok=FYnKOATo

The WetLab-2 Sample Prep Module (SPM)
Credits: NASA / Dominic Hart

 

acd14-0046-007.jpg?itok=6pICJmnh

The Wetlab-2 system includes a commercial PCR instrument (Cepheid SmartCycler) that can perform up to 16 PCR reactions in parallel.
Credits: NASA / Dominic Hart

 

acd15-0066-002.jpg?itok=ebg8Zcoc

The WetLab-2 RNA Sample De-bubbler and Pipette Loading Device
Credits: NASA / Dominic Hart

 

more at the link...

http://www.nasa.gov/ames/research/space-biosciences/wetlab-2

 

---------------------

 

THE MICRO-MOON: 

 

Quote

We've all heard of supermoons--full Moons that are extra big and bright because they occur close to Earth. This week's full moon was the opposite--a micro-moon. April's full Moon was as much as 14% smaller than other full Moons of 2016. Marek Nikodem photographed the shrunken orb over a cement factory in Piechcin, Poland:

 

Marek-Nikodem-DSC_2309_1461390895_strip.

 

Quote

"Hot smoke rising over the factory distorted the shape of the lunar disk and made it seem that the Moon was being drawn into the smokestack," says Nikodem. Not even a micromoon, however, is small enough to fit inside a chimney. Photos taken moments later reveal the disk floating free.

 

Full Moons vary in size because of the oval shape of the Moon's orbit. The Moon follows an elliptical path around Earth with one side ("perigee") about 50,000 km closer than the other ("apogee"). Full Moons that occur on the apogee side of the Moon's orbit seem a bit smaller and dimmer than usual. That's what happened on April 22nd. The Moon became full at 05:24 UT only 13 hours after apogee--a coincience that reduced the size of the lunar orb.

 

The supermoon will return on Nov. 14 when the Moon becomes full at perigee. Stay tuned for that.

http://www.spaceweather.com/

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 22 April 2016

 

iss_on_orbit_status_011514_945.jpg

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 22 April 2016.                NASA

 

Quote

Today: European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Rotor Based Life Support System (RBLSS) Module and Water Reservoir Installation.

 

The crew installed all four EMCS RBLSS modules, two Water Reservoirs, and replaced the Fire Port Decal. These activities will support the Plant RNA Regulation investigation that is scheduled to arrive on SpaceX-9. The EMCS is an ESA experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

 

Energy Operations: The crew began the first day of a ten day ESA Energy experiment run by performing four oxygen uptake measurements sessions. The data collected from the sessions will be used to measure metabolic changes. This investigation will help determine the crewmember's energy requirements for long-term space flight. Energy also measures adaptations in the components of total energy expenditure of crewmembers so that an equation to determine the energy requirements of crewmembers during space flight may be derived. Such knowledge of energy requirements is of a great importance to ensure health, good performance and the overall success of a mission and also contributes to ensure adequate exercise load and cargo allotments for food during space flight.

 

Plant Gravity Sensing-3 (PGS-3): The crew retrieved the Seed Paper Kits from the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and installed the Plant Experiment Unit into Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) before beginning the Plant Gravity Sensing experiment. The investigation studies whether plants grown in microgravity can sense the changes in the gravitational acceleration. Gravity is a critical environmental factor affecting the morphology and functions of organisms on Earth.

 

Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Session: The crew completed the second of four Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler sessions by processing a quality control sample to verify that the SmartCycler operates as expected in microgravity. The Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the ISS. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space.

 

Quote

Robotics Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Serving System (MSS) and maneuvered Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm1 to position Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM1) so that the gripper microswitches could be seen in SPDM Body Camera 1. They completed three OTCM1 checkouts and three OTCM1 free space grasps. The safing during grasping failure signature previously seen was seen again during the third OTCM1 checkout and the third OTCM free space grasp. Controllers also performed one OTCM2 checkout and one OTCM2 free space grasp for comparison. Engineering teams met this afternoon to discuss troubleshooting results and a forward plan, and the decision was made to reattempt the grasp of the tool tonight.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

JEMAL ops
Smart Cycler ops
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Saturday, 04/23: Crew off duty, housekeeping, ENERGY
Sunday, 04/24: Crew off duty, FE-6 runs the London Marathon on T2
Monday, 04/25: Crew off duty: payback for working Cosmonautics Day on April 11 (SpX-8 ops)

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-22-april-2016.html

 

Space Station Live: An Earth Day View of Earth

video is 10:28 min.

 

Quote

Published on Apr 22, 2016
NASA Commentator Amiko Kauderer talks with Dr. Lisa Vanderbloemen, the manager of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, about the pictures of Earth gathered by International Space Station crew members during the Crew Earth Observation experiment. Taking advantage of the perch 250 miles above the planet, astronauts can capture images that document the impact that the human inhabitants of Earth have on their planet and let experts monitor natural disasters. Most of the images are available to the public online at the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov).

 

-----------------------

 

Astronaut Completes London Marathon, Station Trio Relaxes

 

blog_iss046e024411.jpg

Astronaut Tim Peake, from the European Space Agency, checks science hardware inside the Columbus lab module.

 

Quote

Three Expedition 47 crew members are relaxing today after several weeks of supporting the arrival and departure of numerous cargo vehicles. The other three Russian crew members continued their science and maintenance duties.

 

British astronaut Tim Peake strapped himself into the Tranquility module’s treadmill Sunday and ran the 26.2 mile London Marathon. The last time an astronaut ran a marathon in space was April 16, 2007, when Expedition 14 Flight Engineer Suni Williams completed the Boston Marathon on a treadmill in the Zvezda service module.

 

Some of the science taking place onboard the orbital laboratory looked at an astronaut’s energy requirements necessary to sustain a long-term mission beyond low-Earth orbit. The crew also looked at cardiovascular performance, the forces the space station experiences during dynamic mission events and observed the health of forests on Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/25/astronaut-completes-london-marathon-station-trio-relaxes/

 

------------------------

 

Nostalgia time...saw this over on reddit  /r/space, had to post this gem.

 

Quote

Neil A. Armstrong greeted by his son Mark upon his return from the Moon while still in the Mobile Quarantine Facility. The three Apollo 11 astronauts were confined for 21 days to prevent the spread of any contagions from the Moon. (27 July, 1969) (spaceflight.nasa.gov)

KAxjCxHibGGHi65IqaFVLqZ5M9lGMZhZd11BQSl2

Mobile Quarantine Facility           NASA

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 26 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_042616_9

Training engineers watch at one station while Commercial Crew astronauts Eric Boe and Suni Williams practice docking operations for Boeing's CST-100 Starliner using a part-task trainer designed to mimic the controls and behavior of the spacecraft. They are part of a suite of cloud-based and hands-on trainers that Boeing has built to prepare astronauts and mission controllers. Credit: NASA.

 

Quote

The six Expedition 47 crew members were back at work Tuesday exploring life science and other fields to advance humanity on and off Earth. The International Space Station residents also checked out new spacecraft communications gear.

 

Scientists are researching how the lack of gravity weakens bones and muscles. They are testing an antibody used on Earth that prevents this weakening in mice. The facility that houses the mice on the station for this study was inspected today then restocked with food.

 

Hardware was set up today that will measure fluid pressure in an astronaut's head for the Fluid Shifts experiment. That study observes how living in space impacts cells and blood vessels and researches the possibility that it may affect vision.

 

The crew continues to document its living conditions on the space station to help engineers design future spacecraft with habitable accommodations. New radios that were installed in March are also being tested that will communicate with future spacecraft to visit the station.

 

Quote

Wet Lab Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) SmartCycler Session: The crew completed the third of four Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler sessions by processing a quality control sample to verify that the SmartCycler operates as expected in microgravity. The Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the ISS. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space.

 

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Radio Frequency (RF) Checkout: The C2V2 Comm Units are two fully redundant radios (C2V2 A and C2V2 B) that are planned for use with future visiting vehicles. The units were installed on March 11 in MSS-2 rack in the LAB. Initial activation was performed on April 1. The following tests have been completed.

 

- Monday: A Radio Frequency (RF) pass lasting approximately 8 minutes was completed successfully with appropriate "fill frames" transmitted to the ground. This test provided confirmation that the C2V2 A's forward and aft antennas are functioning as planned.


- Tuesday: Two tests were performed. In the first test, C2V2-A successfully sent a command and GPS Auxiliary Data (GAD) to Electronic System Test Laboratory (ESTL) on the forward link. In the second test, C2V2-A successfully sent GAD, Broadcast Auxiliary Data (BAD) and Audio to ESTL on the forward link and successful performed a comm check on S/G 4 between CAPCOM and ESTL.

Checkout tests are planned daily until May 6.

 

Recycle Fill Tank Assembly (RFTA): On Sunday the RFTA stopped short of empty when draining to a Russian [EDV]. The ball bearing level indication stopped short of full by ½" to ¾". The crew proceeded with troubleshooting and completed the RFTA drain to a Temporary Urine and Brine Storage System (TUBSS). The likely cause was the EDV initially used had some residue brine that caused the RFTA to not drain completely. Ground teams will continue to track the performance of the tanks.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations/HTV-6 Get-ahead Tasks: Yesterday, Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) operations began fully retracting the secondary bolts (H1), breaking torque on the primary bolts (H2), and re-torquing the primary bolts to a lower setting on the S4 batteries. Ground teams operations were successful for 6 bolts, unsuccessful for 2 bolts, and have 4 bolts that remain to be attempted. Later today, re-attempts on bolts 3A2-1 H1, 3A2-2 H1 and initial attempts on the 4 remaining H2 bolts will resume. Order of operation and status is as follows:

 

- 3A Battery 3A2-1, Bolt H1 - Not successful
- 3A Battery 3A2-2, Bolt H1 - Not successful
- 3A Battery 3A2-1, Bolt H2 - Forward work (Can't be attempted until H1 released)
- 3A Battery 3A2-2, Bolt H2 - Forward work (Can't be attempted until H1 released)
- 3A Battery 3A1-1, Bolt H1 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A1-2, Bolt H1 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A1-2, Bolt H2 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A1-1, Bolt H2 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A3-1, Bolt H1 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A3-2, Bolt H1 - Successful
- 3A Battery 3A3-1, Bolt H2 - Forward work (Ran out of time on 4/25/16)
- 3A Battery 3A3-2, Bolt H2 - Forward work (Ran out of time on 4/25/16)

 

London Marathon: On Sunday, Peake ran the 26.2-mile London Marathon on the Treadmill 2 (T2) in an estimated time of 3:35:21. He was the official starter of the race and watched BBC coverage of the event while running. He is the second astronaut to run a marathon on the ISS. In 2007, Sunita Williams ran the Boston Marathon on T2.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
RR ops
Battery bolt ops
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 04/27: Nano Racks Module 9 ops, Fluid Shifts, Genes in Space MWA prep, Habitability
Thursday, 04/28: ENERGY, CMS3 closeout, HRF resupply
Friday, 04/29: SmartCycler, METERON, ENERGY

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-26-april-2016.html

 

Simulators Offer Astronauts Glimpse of Future Flight

video is 1:26 min.

 

 

 

Space Station Live: The WetLab SmartCycler

video is 5:50 min.

 

Quote

Published on Apr 26, 2016
NASA Commentator Dan Huot talks to Dr. Macarena Parra of the NASA Ames Research Center, the project scientist for the WetLab-02 technology validation project now underway on the International Space Station. Cellular biologists doing research on the station currently have to send samples back to Earth to get gene expression information; WetLab-2 is an effort to perform that analysis on orbit, which would accelerate the timetable of an experiment and prevent the loss of results due to deterioration of an RNA sample in transit back to Earth.

 

 

----------------------------------

 

Filipino Satellite Deployed from Japanese Lab

 

exp47_042716b_blog.jpg

The Filipino DIWATA-1 satellite is deployed (left) from the Japanese Kibo lab module (right). Credit: NASA TV

 

Quote

A microsatellite designed in the Philippines was deployed outside Japan’s Kibo laboratory module this morning for climate research. Inside the International Space Station, the crew continued more human research to improve the health of astronauts in space and citizens on Earth.

 

DIWATA-1, Filipino for “fairy”, is orbiting Earth after being released today from a satellite deployer mechanism outside the Kibo module’s airlock. The 50-kilogram-class microsatellite will observe the Earth’s climate to improve weather forecasting and natural disaster response.

 

The Expedition 47 crew is continuing its research today into how the lack of gravity affects the fluid shifts and pressure inside a crew member’s head. Scientists are also looking at how astronauts work with detailed, interactive tasks for the Fine Motor Skills study using a touchscreen tablet.

 

The space station regularly experiences stresses on its structure when spaceships dock, during spacewalks and crew exercise sessions. Researchers will look at some of the vibration data sent down by the crew today for the long-running Identification study.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/27/filipino-satellite-deployed-from-japanese-lab/

 

---------------------------

 

ISS Calendar

 

Quote

Date  Event

April  Satellite Deployment (STMSAT-1)

May 11, 2016  Dragon SpX-8 Departure & Landing

May 20, 2016  Cygnus OA-6 Unberthing, Release

May  Flock-2e-Prime CubeSat Deployment

May  BEAM Module Expansion

June 5, 2016  Soyuz TMA-19M Undocking & Landing (Malenchenko, Kopra, Peake)

June 21, 2016  Soyuz MS Launch & Docking (Ivanishin, Onishi, Rubins)

June 24, 2016   (TBD)Cygnus OA-5 Launch atop Antares 230

June 24, 2016   (TBD)Dragon SpX-9 Launch atop Falcon 9

June 26, 2016   (TBD)Dragon SpX-9 Rendezvous, Capture & Berthing

more at...

http://spaceflight101.com/iss/iss-calendar/

 

---------------------------

 

OUR PLANET FROM SPACE

 

Quote

Greetings to the readers of our blog!
Surely you have heard many times the answer to the question: "How do astronauts like to spend their free time on board the International Space Station?". Of course with a camera and a window, and best of all with a camera module "Dome", which is already seven windows. 
Today I want to share a few fairly successful photographs of our home - planet Earth made just from the module "Dome". I hope you enjoy it!


All images by Yuri Malenchenko

http://www.roscosmos.ru/22191/

 

grezia_malencenko.jpg

Greece               Yuri Malenchenko

 

 

krasnoe.more.i.nil_malencenko.jpg

Red Sea and River Nile                     Yuri Malenchenko

 

 

somali.jpg

Coast of Somalia and the Indian Ocean                            Yuri Malenchenko

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ISS Daily Summary Report – 04/27/16

 

Quote

Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Demonstration (JSSOD) Microsat “DIWATA” #1 (M-1) Deploy: Earlier this morning the crew opened the outer hatch and extended the Slide Table (ST) to the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF) in preparation for JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) grapple and deployment of the JSSOD M-1 satellite. Satellite deployment was completed successfully. The crew then retracted the ST and closed the hatch.  Microsat is a 50-kg-class microsatellite named “DIWATA-1” (meaning “fairy” in Filipino). It is the first microsatellite owned by the Philippine government with Filipino engineers involved in its development. The satellite will observe Earth and monitor climate changes.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations/H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-6 Get-ahead Tasks: The robotics ground controllers continued with Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) operations to retract the secondary bolts (H1), breaking torque on the primary bolts (H2), and re-torqueing the primary bolts to a lower setting on the S4 batteries.  All 3A battery bolts are complete except for battery 3A2-2 H1 bolt. Engineering and robotics teams are working a forward plan for battery 3A2-2 completion including whether the maximum commanded torque can be increased. The arm is now in position to support 1A battery operations scheduled to begin tomorrow.

 

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Radio Frequency (RF) Checkout Day 3: C2V2-A RF checkout test D was completed. C2V2-A sent Global Positioning System (GPS) Auxiliary Data (GAD) to the simulated Visiting Vehicle (Electronic System Test Laboratory) on the forward link. Ground teams verified health and status telemetry from the Visiting Vehicle on the return link.

 

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) LA2B_A Remote Power Controller (RPC) 4 Trip: RPCM LA2B_A RPC 4 tripped today.  This RPC powers the Rack Flow Control Assembly (RFCA) for EXPRESS Rack 2 (ER2). The RFCA was open at the time of the trip, so coolant is still flowing to the rack and there is no immediate impact to ER2 operation or Payloads in the rack. Review of the 50 Hz data dump indicates that this was an overcurrent trip of 3.5 +/ 0.2 amps which met the RPC Trip Limit. The RPC is currently open with closed command inhibited. Ground teams are investigating the cause of the trip.

 

Dragon Cargo Operations: As of last night, the crew had completed 12:40 hours of cargo transfer. Six and 1/2 hours were completed today for a total of 19 hours completed resulting in ~26 hours remaining to be completed.

 

Quote

Ground Activities

All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

JSSOD M-1 deploy
Nominal ground commanding
 

Three-Day Look Ahead:

Thursday, 04/28: ENERGY, CMS3 closeout, HRF resupply

Friday, 04/29: SmartCycler, METERON, ENERGY

Saturday, 04/30: Crew off duty; housekeeping

 

QUICK ISS Status – Environmental Control Group:

                              Component    Status
Elektron    On
Vozdukh    Manual
[СКВ] 1 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV1”)    On
[СКВ] 2 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV2”)    Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab    Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3    Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab    Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3    Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA)    Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)    Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab    Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3    Full Up

https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2016/04/27/iss-daily-summary-report-042716/

 

---------------------------------

 

Robotics and Human Research as Dragon Packed for Departure

 

blog_iss046e015670.jpg

A solar array crosses this image of an aurora tweeted by astronaut Tim Kopra. Credit: @Astro_Tim

 

Quote

The crew trained for an experiment that is exploring new technologies to support missions farther out into space. Life science also continued this week as the astronauts researched how the lack of gravity affects their bodies.

 

Scientists are studying the possibility of a space internet and remotely controlling rovers on a planetary surface from a spacecraft. British astronaut Tim Peake trained on the rover control software for the METERON experiment that may also enable closer human and robotic connections in hazardous conditions.

 

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin joined each other for more work on the Fluid Shifts study. That experiment observes how living in space impacts a crew member’s cells, blood vessels, brain pressure and vision.

 

Commander Tim Kopra is stowing gear inside the SpaceX Dragon for retrieval back on Earth. The Dragon is due to be released from the Harmony module May 11 for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean a few hours later.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/28/robotics-and-human-research-as-dragon-packed-for-departure/

 

-------------------------

 

Diwata-1 Earth Observation Satellite deployed from Space Station

 

ChDYHLCXEAER5bE.jpg-large-512x337.jpg

Photo: NASA/ESA

 

Quote

The first microsatellite built and operated by the Philippines was released from the International Space Station on Wednesday.

 

Diwata-1 was deployed by the Japanese Robotic Arm at 11:45 UTC to begin a mission of around one year to demonstrate Earth Observation instruments for small satellites. Outfitted with four payloads, the satellite will deliver imagery at a resolution of up to three meters while other instruments operate at lower resolutions but deliver a view of a wider area on the ground for a number of operational applications.

 

The 50-Kilogram Diwata-1 satellite is the first in a Japanese project to send 50 microsatellites into orbit in the coming decades to establish long-term operational Earth observation capabilities. A number of countries joined the effort including the Philippines with two satellites under Filipino operation currently planned for the project. The Diwata-1 satellite is also part of the Philippine Scientific Earth Observation Microsatellite (PHL-Microsat) Program operated by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). It is named after the Filipino mythological character Diwata (=Fairy).

more at the link...

http://spaceflight101.com/diwata-1-earth-observation-satellite-deployed-from-space-station/

 

--------------------------------

 

Cumulonimbus Clouds Viewed From Orbit

 

oo26654242165.jpg

Cumulonimbus Clouds               ESA/NASA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: I'm guessing there was an impressive storm going on under that cumulonimbus cloud! Credits: ESA/NASA

http://spaceref.com/earth/cumulonimbus-clouds-viewed-from-orbit.html

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA ISS Space to Ground Weekly Report - 29 April 2016

 

Quote

NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

Space to Ground: Space Marathon: 04/29/2016

video is 2:07 min.

 

 

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-iss-space-to-ground-weekly-report---29-april-2016.html

 

--------------------------

 

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 28 April 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_042816_9

Node-3 Tranquillity provides life-support for the International Space Station. Part of Tranquility is ESA's Cupola observation module, a seven-window dome-shaped structure from where the Space Station's robotic arm, Canadarm 2, is operated as it offers a panoramic view of space and Earth. Launched on Space Shuttle flight STS-130 in February 2010, Node-3 was attached to the port side of Node-1 Unity. Credit: ESA. (See video below.)

 

Quote

The crew trained for an experiment that is exploring new technologies to support missions farther out into space. Life science also continued this week as the astronauts researched how the lack of gravity affects their bodies.

 

Scientists are studying the possibility of a space internet and remotely controlling rovers on a planetary surface from a spacecraft. British astronaut Tim Peake trained on the rover control software for the METERON experiment that may also enable closer human and robotic connections in hazardous conditions.

 

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin joined each other for more work on the Fluid Shifts study. That experiment observes how living in space impacts a crew member's cells, blood vessels, brain pressure and vision.

 

Commander Tim Kopra is stowing gear inside the SpaceX Dragon for retrieval back on Earth. The Dragon is due to be released from the Harmony module May 11 for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean a few hours later.

 

Space Station 360: Tranquility (Node 3)

video is 3:29 min.

Quote

Published on Apr 28, 2016
Explore the International Space Station's Tranquility module from all angles on your mobile phone or headset

 

 

Quote

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations/HTV-6 Get-ahead Tasks: Robotics Ground Controllers are currently performing 1A battery operations. The first bolt's torque has been successfully released. Engineering and robotics teams are working a forward plan for battery 3A2-2 H1 bolt completion including increasing the maximum commanded torque. Additional attempts are tentatively scheduled tomorrow.

 

Inadvertent Time Tag Command during 4A3 Battery Reconditioning: During 4A3 battery reconditioning operations this morning, a time-tagged command executed after the time tag queue had been cleared. The executed command was the Battery Charge Discharge Unit (BCDU) Fault Isolator Closed command. After the error was discovered, a BCDU Fault Isolator Open command was executed to correct. There were no impacts to the vehicle. Data will be evaluated following 4A3 battery reconditioning completion on May 4 to determine if there was any impact to the reconditioning effort.

 

Human Research Facility (HRF) Resupply: The crew restocked HRF supplies and trashed expired and limited life items.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
1A battery bolt ops
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 04/29: SmartCycler, METERON, ENERGY, MSPR Microscope closeout, N1 reconfig
Saturday, 04/30: Crew off duty; housekeeping
Sunday, 05/01: Crew off duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Normal
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-28-april-2016.html

 

--------------------------

 

New landing date for crew

 

Quote

29 April 2016
ESA astronaut Tim Peake and his crewmates Yuri Malenchenko and Tim Kopra will return to Earth on 18 June, giving them almost two more weeks more in space than their original mission.

 

Each International Space Station crew flies as a trio to the outpost and back to Earth in a Soyuz spacecraft. About every three months, a crew returns to Earth shortly before a new one arrives, often leaving a few days when only three astronauts look after the Station. 

 

Tim, Tim and Yuri will stay longer in space because ground control aims to keep the Space Station operating at full capacity with six astronauts.

 

Tim Peake says: “Although I am looking forward to being back on Earth and seeing friends and family again, each day spent living in space is a huge privilege and there is much work to do on the Station.

 

“This extension will keep the Station at a full crew of six for several days longer, enabling us to accomplish more scientific research.

 

“And, of course, I get to enjoy the beautiful view of planet Earth for a little while longer!”

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Principia/New_landing_date_for_ESA_astronaut_Tim_Peake

 

--------------------------

 

Breakfast Taco In Space

 

oo26497569366.jpg

Breakfast Taco                 NASA

 

Quote

Tim Kopra photographed his breakfast floating inside of the Unity module aboard the International Space Station.

In a Tweet, he remarked "#Breakfast taco on #ISS: refried beans, shredded pork, pepperjack cheese, eggs, and salsa on a torilla. Awesome..."

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/breakfast-taco-in-space.html

 

-----------------------

 

This Week’s Research Improving Health as Dragon Preps for Departure

 

blog_iss047e066509.jpg

Morning breaks for astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station. SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft sits on the left side of the frame, attached to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module.

 

Quote

The International Space Station crew is wrapping up the week after working on a series of ongoing life science and robotics studies. The SpaceX Dragon is also nearing the end of its stay and preparing for a return to Earth.

 

The astronauts have been helping scientists gather data on what happens to the human body when exposed to microgravity to help NASA plan longer missions farther out into space. Observations from the human research studies help doctors design exercise techniques, diets and other countermeasures to keep astronauts healthy.

 

British astronaut Tim Peake collected tap water and body samples for the Energy experiment today. That study is aiding doctors’ efforts to determine an astronaut’s energy requirements to improve crew health and performance. He also tested the ability of controlling a rover on Earth, or any planetary surface, from a computer on a spacecraft. The METERON experiment may benefit future missions to Mars or hazardous tasks on Earth.

 

Experiment samples, gear and other hardware is being packed inside the Dragon space freighter attached to the Harmony module. Dragon will be released from Harmony May 11 ending a month-long stay. After its departure it will splashdown in the Pacific Ocean a few hours later where the spacecraft and its cargo will be retrieved by SpaceX engineers.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/04/29/this-weeks-research-improving-health-as-dragon-preps-for-departure/

 

---------------------------------

 

Antarctic Meteorite As It Was Found

 

oo25903730963.jpg

Antarctic Meteorite                                ©NASA/CINDY EVANS

 

Quote

A meteorite on the blue ice field in the Miller Range in Antarctica. Credit: NASA/Cindy Evans

http://spaceref.com/antarctica-1/antarctic-meteorite-as-it-was-found.html

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

May Starts With Botany, Genetic Study and Dragon Packing

 

iss047e056031_blog.jpg

NASA astronaut Tim Kopra, commander of Expedition 47, floats inside the Russian segment on Cosmonautics Day 2016.

 

Quote

The Expedition 47 crew began May exploring botany, genetic analysis and life science. SpaceX is also getting ready for the May 11 release and splashdown of its Dragon spacecraft.

 

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams harvested and fixated plants grown for the Plant Gravity Sensing study. Scientists seek to understand the chemical process that guides the direction of roots and how they sense gravity. Williams is also validating the new WetLab-2 system hardware to extract RNA from a cell sample in microgravity.

 

British astronaut Tim Peake swapped gear on a specialized microscope that can download imagery and video to scientists on the ground. Peake also saved data collected from an armband for the Energy study then moved on to the Rodent Research study that observes muscle and bone loss in space.

 

Commander Tim Kopra and Williams are packing and securing cargo inside Dragon for return to Earth next week. SpaceX engineers on a ship will retrieve the Dragon in the Pacific Ocean and return it to a port in southern California. The gear and research will be returned to NASA for analysis.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/02/may-starts-with-botany-genetic-study-and-dragon-packing/

 

---------------------------

 

Tim Peake goes roving

 

Bridget_the_rover_node_full_image_2.jpg

On 29 April 2016, the Mars Yard Test Area at Airbus D&S in Stevenage, UK, will be the location for a very special test: ESA astronaut Tim Peake will drive the rover prototype "Bridget" from the International Space Station. Image courtesy Airbus D&S.

 

Quote

In a live space-to-ground test of human-robot cooperation, ESA astronaut Tim Peake will control a rover on Earth on Friday from the International Space Station, helping prepare for future exploration missions. On 29 April, ESA astronaut Tim Peake will operate a terrestrial rover nicknamed Bridget from the Station as part of a series of experiments investigating how humans interact with robotic systems and vehicles.

 

The 154 kg rover will be driven by Tim starting at 10:00 GMT (12:00 CEST) over simulated Mars terrain in Stevenage, UK, as though he were searching for scientific targets such as rocks. The 30 x 13 m Mars Yard is split into lit and dark areas to simulate, for example, roving into a cave or a shadowed crater. The rover was developed by Airbus DS, who are working with ESA and the UK Space Agency to investigate controlling robots on simulated planets.

 

"Tim will drive it for about 90 minutes," says Jessica Grenouilleau, of ESA's Robotics and Future Projects Office. "Interestingly, he will only be provided with basic training on how to react to situations that the rover encounters, as the experiment aims in part to study how humans interact extemporaneously with robotic systems."

 

On board the Station, Tim will connect via video and data links to the rover at Stevenage using a sophisticated 'delay-tolerant' network, a sort of 'Internet in space', which is itself part of the experiment.

 

This network enables experiment controllers to simulate losses in connections, delays in responding to commands and other disruptions that are expected in future when an astronaut in orbit operates a rover on Mars or an asteroid, for example.

 

It also allows for comparing different modes of rover operations and handover of control between ground and the astronaut.

 

"Future missions into the Solar System will include humans working hand-in-hand with robots as our scouts and proxies, gathering scientific and physical information that will make human exploration feasible," says Philippe Schoonejans, Head of Robotics and Future Projects and coordinator for ESA's Meteron project, under which the rover-driving experiment is being conducted.

 

The experiment involves teams at the Mars Yard in Stevenage, ESA's ESOC operations centre, Darmstadt, Germany, which will serve as the mission control centre for the experiment, and Belgium's Station User Support and Operation Centre in Brussels, which will serve as the interface to the ISS.

more at the link...

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Tim_Peake_goes_roving_999.html

 

-----------------------

 

New landing date for ESA astronaut Tim Peake

 

Quote

ESA astronaut Tim Peake and his crewmates Yuri Malenchenko and Tim Kopra will return to Earth on 18 June, giving them almost two more weeks more in space than their original mission.

 

Each International Space Station crew flies as a trio to the outpost and back to Earth in a Soyuz spacecraft. About every three months, a crew returns to Earth shortly before a new one arrives, often leaving a few days when only three astronauts look after the Station.

 

Tim, Tim and Yuri will stay longer in space because ground control aims to keep the Space Station operating at full capacity with six astronauts.

 

Tim Peake says: "Although I am looking forward to being back on Earth and seeing friends and family again, each day spent living in space is a huge privilege and there is much work to do on the Station.

 

"This extension will keep the Station at a full crew of six for several days longer, enabling us to accomplish more scientific research.

 

"And, of course, I get to enjoy the beautiful view of planet Earth for a little while longer!"

 

Research in space
With three supply vessels recently arrived, the astronauts will be kept busy. Tim Peake released the first Filipino satellite into space from Japan's Kibo laboratory on Wednesday and he operated a rover in Stevenage, UK, as he flew 400 km above Earth today.

 

Meanwhile, the Station's incubators are experimenting with growing blood vessels in weightlessness from cell cultures that line the interior of human blood vessels.

 

Tim recently became the second ESA astronaut to use the Mares muscle-measurement unit that charts his fine motor control as well as giving a detailed overview of muscle torque and speed.

 

Looking at muscle contraction at a specific moment gives little information but Mares provides a full picture of muscle speed and force as an elbow or knee joint bends.

 

Exercise
Astronauts must exercise up to two hours a day to keep fit and healthy for their return. Mission control tries to give them a free day on Sunday - but the exercise regime continues.

 

Last Sunday Tim Peake ran a full marathon on the Station's treadmill at the same time as the London Marathon was being held on Earth. Tim's time was just over three-and-a-half hours, running 42 km while the Station flew almost 100 000 km.

 

Tim will land in the steppe of Kazakhstan and return straight to the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, for checkups and research into how humans adapt to living in space.

 

Next launch
The next Soyuz launch is set for 21 June, now three days after Tim leaves. ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet, preparing for his Proxima mission in November, will be at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, as backup to the crew of Russian commander Anatoli Ivanishin, Japanese Takuya Onishi and NASA's Kathleen Rubins.

 

This will be the first flight of an upgraded Soyuz spacecraft that offers increased cargo capacity.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/New_landing_date_for_ESA_astronaut_Tim_Peake_999.html

 

---------------------------------

 

Boeing borrows from inventory to speed docking adapter delivery

 

2015-2523.jpg

Photo of the second International Dockig Adapter awaiting launch at the Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility. Credit: NASA/Charles Babir

 

Quote

Spare parts warehoused in the the United States and Russia will help Boeing finish assembly of a third space station docking port to receive arriving astronauts aboard Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsules, replacing a unit lost in a Falcon 9 launch failure last year.

 

Components left over from construction of the first two docking adapters will reduce the cost of fabricating an identical third unit, officials said.

 

NASA awarded Boeing a $9 million contract in March to assemble the third International Docking Adapter, or IDA 3, and deliver it to the space agency by March 2017.

 

IDA 3 replaces the first docking adapter lost in June 2015 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that broke apart about two minutes after liftoff from the Cape Canaveral, destroying a Dragon space station supply ship carrying the docking system in its unpressurized trunk.

 

Each docking adapter measures about 42 inches (1.1 meters) tall and 63 inches (1.6 meters) wide, and weighs approximately 1,159 pounds (526 kilograms).

 

Boeing and had about 70 percent of the components — totaling 300 parts — for the replacement docking port in inventory, according to Kelly Kaplan, a Boeing spokesperson.

 

16545930616_cd430c2889_o-678x381.jpg

Artist’s concept showing the locations planned for the first two International Docking Adapters. IDA 2, set for launch this summer, will take the place intended to be occupied by IDA 1 on the forward part of the Harmony module. IDA 3 will take the zenith port on Harmony. Credit: NASA

 

Quote

The docking adapter’s primary structure is made by RSC Energia in Russia, and it arrived at Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility in early April, Kaplan said.

 

The Boeing-built docking systems attach to pressurized mating adapters on the space station used to receive visiting space shuttles during the outpost’s assembly. The shuttle’s docking system and the station’s pressurized mating adapters were based on the Androgynous Peripheral Attach System, or APAS, designed to accommodate U.S. spacecraft connecting in orbit with Russian vehicles.

 

“The APAS was the Russian system that the U.S. and Russia built a derivative for Apollo-Soyuz, and also used for Shuttle-Mir and the International Space Station,” said Mark Mulqueen, Boeing’s space station program manager. “We had to interface with that, so they had a lot of parts that we utilized.”

 

Boeing is NASA’s prime contractor for the space station.

 

Quote

The Boeing-built International Docking Adapters are designed to receive any spacecraft, including the commercial SpaceX Crew Dragon and Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, future cargo freighters, and other craft yet to be designed.

 

“It’s free for anyone to use,” Mulqueen said. “Sierra Nevada is using it, and SpaceX is designing their own similar system. They took our requirements and were able to make their own system. We’ll be using it for CST-100.”

 

Mulqueen said the second International Docking Adapter, or IDA 2, is complete and ready for launch this summer on SpaceX’s ninth operational Dragon supply mission to the space station.

 

NASA has tentatively planned to launch the third IDA on the SpaceX CRS 14 cargo mission in early 2018.

 

Two International Docking Adapters at the space station will allow Boeing and SpaceX commercial crew capsules to be attached to the complex at the same time.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/05/01/boeing-borrows-from-inventory-to-speed-docking-adapter-delivery/

 

-------------------------------

 

Venice
Italy
12 days ago

 

Quote

A breakwater, an artificial island, and a series of massive sluice gates in the Venetian Lagoon‘s Lido Inlet are part of the MOSE project—a massive engineering project designed to protect the city of Venice from rising seasonal floodwaters.

venice-web.jpg

Venice                   Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/venice/

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Crew Looks at Plants and Mice for Health Insights

 

exp47_050316_blog.jpg

Astronaut Tim Peake from the European Space Agency talks to science and space journalists gathered at The Royal Institution in London, England. Credit: NASA TV

 

Quote

Today, the crew is observing how the lack of gravity affects plants and rodents. NASA is using the observations to improve the health of astronauts in space and humans on Earth.

 

The crew is stowing plant samples harvested for the Plant Gravity Sensing botany study to understand how roots sense gravity. The samples are being inserted into a science freezer for return to Earth aboard the SpaceX Dragon next week. Results may help astronauts grow their own food while living in space.

 

Rodents are also being observed in a habitat designed to house them in space. The Rodent Research-3 experiment is studying how space changes the musculoskeletal system and if an antibody that prevents muscle weakening on Earth works in space.

 

Dragon is still being loaded with gear and science for analysis on the ground. The private space freighter will be removed from the Harmony module and released from the Canadarm2 robotic arm for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean May 11.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/03/crew-looks-at-plants-and-mice-for-health-insights/

 

------------------------

 

Science in Short: Remote Sensing and Genomics Studies

 

casis_report.jpg

The Campaign Good Earth Gap Analysis Report , commissioned by CASIS, is a study to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the ISS as a host for commercial remote sensing payloads, including the products and needs of the data analytics community. Credits: CASIS

 

Quote

On April 28, CASIS released their Good Earth Technology Gap Study (PDF). Compiled for them by From James Goodman of Hyspeed Computing, this report is part external facility researchers guide, part market study, and recommends particular lines of interest in sensors: hyperspectral, Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR); and for next generation on-board data compression and computing capabilities.

 

iss047e085701-1024x682.jpg

The WetLab RNA SmartCycler allows station crew members to extract RNA from multiple types of biological specimens in less than 30 minutes. Credits: NASA

 

Quote

On orbit last week the Wetlab-2 technology demonstration runs have declared success in their ability to show that the device can amplify RNA (ribonucleic acid) using a commercially adapted quantitative polymerase chain reaction machine (qPCR) in space.

 

Scientists studying a wide range of biology questions need quality gene-expression information, which requires specialized equipment that can extract DNA and RNA. Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler (Wetlab-2) validates a new system that can take a sample grown in orbit, extract RNA, and set up reactions that record gene expressions in real time.

 

Data can be downlinked to Earth for analysis, improving scientists’ ability to study biological processes in microgravity. Specifically, last week, they have showed that they were able to achieve Simplex, Duplex and Triplex qPCR amplification which refers to the number separate reagents targeting areas of gene expression being amplified in a single batch. This week, the crew has begun the final of four WetLab-2 sessions by conducting the validation operations and processing a cell sample to extract the RNA.

 

Kirt Costello
ISS Deputy Chief Scientist and Program Science Office Manager

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/2016/05/03/science-in-short-remote-sensing-and-genomics-studies/

 

-------------------------------

 

ISS Robots prepare for Battery Replacements, New Crew Vehicle Comm System enters Testing

 

SPDM-S4-Batteries-6-512x304.jpg

image   NASA

 

Quote

Robotics were underway aboard the International Space Station this week to set up for the arrival of a new set of batteries later this year to replace aging batteries installed on the Station’s truss segments.

 

The work, carried out by the Station’s Dextre robot, involved loosening a number of bolts to ease the removal of the battery systems by spacewalking astronauts when the new units have arrived on ISS.

 

Dependable batteries are an absolute necessity for the operation of the International Space Station, constantly drifting in and out of orbital night. For an average of 35 minutes per lap around the planet, ISS is in darkness and its batteries must take over for the solar arrays. To ensure the station can run efficiently through the end of its operation in the late 2020s, development of a lithium-ion battery-based system was started to replace the nickel-hydrogen batteries that powered ISS for the first part of its stay in orbit.

 

Quote

Li-ion batteries weigh less but offer higher power – one Li-ion battery can replace two of the older NiH battery units and their operational life is almost twice as long as that of the Nickel-Hydrogen batteries.

 

Six Japanese-built Li-Ion Battery Orbital Replacement Units are set for launch on the Exposed Pallet of the H-II Transfer Vehicle 6, currently looking at a notional launch date on October 1. These batteries will be installed on the S4 truss segment via two EVAs in which the spacewalkers, assisted by the Station’s robots, will remove the old batteries and put the new ones in their place.

 

The Station’s batteries reside out on the Truss Segments, in close proximity to the solar arrays. The batteries are installed on what is known as Integrated Equipment Assemblies – large platforms hosting power system components.

 

Integrated Equipment Assemblies are installed on the P4, P6, S4 and S6 truss segments and each contains 12 Battery Subassembly Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), six Battery Charge/Discharge Unit ORUs, two Direct Current Switching Unit ORUs, two Photovoltaic Controller Unit ORUs, and the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System.

 

Each Battery ORU measures 104 by 94 by 48 centimeters in size with a mass of 169 Kilograms. Currently, each of the batteries is comprised of 38 cells plus a Battery Signal Conditioning and Control Module that delivers sensor data and controls the operation of the battery.

ISS-Integrated-Equipment-Assembly-Boeing

Battery ORUs on Integrated Equipment Assembly – Image: Boeing

 

SPDM-S4-Batteries-2-512x295.jpg

Dextre Approaches Battery ORU FRAM Bolt – Photo: NASA

 

Quote

The current plan is for the first set of new batteries to fly to ISS aboard the HTV-6 spacecraft penciled in for launch in October. HTV-6 is set for a stay of 52 Days, facilitating the extraction of the Exposed Pallet from the craft’s Unpressurized Logistics Carrier. The EP will be temp-stowed on a location on ISS so that the new batteries can be accessed.

 

Based on experience-gathering operations completed in February, teams expect to use the Dextre robot for some tasks involving the handling of battery ORUs and their transfer from one location to another. This robotic assistance will reduce the number of EVAs required for the battery replacement from around six to just two excursions.

 

The two spacewalks are planned in the first half of the HTV-6 mission with four contingency EVAs already worked into the schedule of the second half of the mission in order to protect for the event of problems with the robotic handling of batteries or any other unforeseen issues.

more at ...

http://spaceflight101.com/iss-sets-up-for-battery-switch-c2v2-testing/

 

I have an overview post on the ISS EPS (Electrical power System) on page 5 of this thread...

EPS Electrical Power System

 

---------------------------------

 

C2V2 Checkout

 

8300094_orig-512x382.png

C2V2 Antenna Booms – Image: NASA

 

Quote

In addition to a busy robotics schedule, ISS started a critical testing campaign this week involving the Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) System, a critical piece of infrastructure established on ISS for the support of Commercial Crew Traffic beginning with initial test flights in 2017.

 

The C2V2 system is comprised of external antenna systems and internal radio units and processing electronics to allow ISS to communicate with approaching Visiting Vehicles, exchanging relative navigation data and providing a voice link between the two craft.

 

The external C2V2 equipment was installed in March 2015 in a spacewalk performed by Barry Wilmore and Terry Virts. A pair of antenna booms was put in place on the S3 and P3 truss segments, retroreflectors to guide vehicles to their docking ports were installed and four cables were laid down from the truss to the Station’s modules to provide data and electrical connectivity to the antenna system.

 

The internal components for C2V2, specifically two fully redundant C2V2 Communications Units, were installed in the Destiny Laboratory in March and connected to the antenna lines and ISS command and control systems. An initial aliveness check of the new system was finished on April 1st, confirming all electronics of the C2V2 system were up and running.

 

A detailed test campaign was initiated on Monday and is expected to run through May 6 to complete radio checks with C2V2 to verify the primary and redundant strings can connect to visiting vehicles and carry the necessary data for rendezvous operations.

 

On Monday, the C2V2-A radio system completed an eight-minute communications pass with a ground station, successfully transmitting still frames, showing that the A-String forward and aft antennas are functioning as planned.

 

A pair of tests followed on Tuesday, involving the C2V2-A system sending commands and GPS Auxiliary Data (GAD) to the Electronic System Test Laboratory – a simulated visiting vehicle. The second test saw the system successfully transmitting GAD, audio, and Broadcast Auxiliary Data confirmed through the test laboratory and a good communications check through Space-to-Ground 4. Additional forward and return link checks on the C2V2-A system occurred on Wednesday.

 

Heading into the new week, teams will repeat testing on the C2V2-B system to make sure ISS has two functioning systems in readiness for the start of Commercial Crew Missions.

SpaceX is currently looking at an uncrewed test flight of the Dragon 2 spacecraft No-Earlier-Than January 2017 to be followed by a crewed test flight to ISS in the August/September time frame. Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is aiming for its maiden flight in June 2017 and the first crewed mission in October.

http://spaceflight101.com/iss-sets-up-for-battery-switch-c2v2-testing/

 

---------------------------

 

Spring Thaw on Lake Manitoba
Canada
3 days ago

 

Quote

The spring thaw has hit Lake Manitoba, part of an enormous, complex natural drainage system. Water from the lake flows through an intricate network of rivers and lakes, ultimately draining into the Hudson Bay.

spring-thaw-compare-web.jpg

Lake Manitoba   Planet Labs Inc.

 

spring-thaw-web.jpg

Lake Manitoba            Planet Labs Inc.

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/spring-thaw/

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 3 May 2016

 

iss_on_orbit_status_011514_945.jpg

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 3 May 2016.              NASA

 

Quote

Today, the crew is observing how the lack of gravity affects plants and rodents. NASA is using the observations to improve the health of astronauts in space and humans on Earth.

 

The crew is stowing plant samples harvested for the Plant Gravity Sensing botany study to understand how roots sense gravity. The samples are being inserted into a science freezer for return to Earth aboard the SpaceX Dragon next week. Results may help astronauts grow their own food while living in space.

 

Rodents are also being observed in a habitat designed to house them in space. The Rodent Research-3 experiment is studying how space changes the musculoskeletal system and if an antibody that prevents muscle weakening on Earth works in space.

 

Dragon is still being loaded with gear and science for analysis on the ground. The private space freighter will be removed from the Harmony module and released from the Canadarm2 robotic arm for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean May 11.

 

Quote

Intra-module Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration: Yesterday, in an effort to reduce ppCO2 levels, ground commanding was performed to implement split ventilation between the USOS and Russian segments. The system has not yet reached a steady state, however, ppCO2 is trending lower than the Node 3 CDRA/Vozdukh combination was able to support in the previous configuration. Teams continue to monitor CO2 closely as they characterize the new configuration.

 

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Survey: Robotics Ground Controllers are currently making preparations to survey the AMS using various cameras from various Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS)/Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) positions. The survey is being performed to understand the state of the payload as well as to obtain detailed views of the payload. Following the survey SPDM will be stowed on Mobile Base System 2 (MBS 2) and SSRMS will be maneuvered to a translate configuration.

 

Dragon Cargo Transfer Status: The crew has completed ~34.5 hours of cargo transfer with ~13.5 hours remaining to be completed.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
C2V2 checkout
SSRMS powerup/AMS survey
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 05/04: RR CASIS ops, Fluid Shifts ops, FSL optical cable install
Thursday, 05/05: Fluid Shifts, Nano Racks Platform 2 module removal, Microbial sample collect
Friday, 05/06: RR CASIS ops, Nano Racks Module 9 ops, Fluid Shifts, Microbial sample collect

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Norm
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-3-may-2016.html

 

A Moment with Jeff Williams

video is 2:03 min.

 

 

 

---------------------------------

 

Fluid Pressure Research and Robotic Preps for Dragon Release

 

blog_iss047e069406.jpg

Oblique south-looking view of the main Bahama island chain as seen from the International Space Station.

 

Quote

The astronauts onboard the International Space Station are researching how microgravity affects fluid shifts in a crew member’s body. Ground controllers are also guiding Canada’s robotic arm into position before next week’s grapple and release of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft.

 

The Fluid Shifts experiment will wrap up operations this week with the crew wearing specialized body suits. The suits, known as Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure devices, measure how fluids move from the lower body to the upper body while living in space. The research also observes fluid shifts in and out of cells and blood vessels which may impact head pressure potentially affecting vision.

 

Robotics controllers are remotely guiding the Canadarm2 to the Harmony module where it will grapple Dragon ahead of the spacecraft’s May 11 release and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Yesterday, the controllers surveyed the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer’s condition with the Canadarm2 and its cameras.

 

Cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka is on his second mission aboard the space station. His first mission during Expedition 25/26 lasted 159 days. Currently, he is Expedition 47 Flight Engineer and today is his 47th day aboard the orbital lab since his March arrival with fellow crew members Jeff Williams and Alexey Ovchinin.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/04/fluid-pressure-research-and-robotic-preps-for-dragon-release/

 

--------------------------------

 

A Lab Aloft (International Space Station Research)

 

Studying Cardiovascular Health in Microgravity

 

Quote

In today’s A Lab Aloft, Richard L. Hughson, PhD, discusses various studies that seek to understand the cardiovascular health of astronauts on orbit, and the effects of spaceflight on the cardiovascular system once astronauts return to Earth. 

This is a very long article, but I found it quite interesting, at the link...

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/2016/05/04/studying-cardiovascular-health-in-microgravity/

 

----------------------------

 

ISS solar transit in ultra slow motion (570 FPS)

video is 0:10 min.

done by Bartosz Wojczyński     (He does real good work)

 

Quote

Recorded at 570 frames per second, played back at 60 (9.5 times slower). 5 horizontal panes at a resolution of 1392x320, aligned with custom software, stitched in Photoshop.
Transit duration was 0.8 of a second.

2016-04-30, 09:50:41 CEST
Lubecko, Poland, φ = 50° 41′ 54″ N; λ = 18° 38′ 42″ E
ISS distance = 605 km, ISS angular size = 45.7″

Sky-Watcher ED80, f = 600 mm
ZWO ASI 174MM, gain = 75, shutter = 64 μs, fps = 570

 

----------------------------

 

Tullach Mohr Fire
South Africa
12 hours ago

 

Quote

Smoke billows over the Tullach-Mohr Nature Reserve in northeastern South Africa.

tullach-mohr-fire-web.jpg

Tullach Mohr Fire                 Planet Labs Inc.

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/tullach-mohr-fire/

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 4 May 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_050416_9

Scott Kelly uses ultrasound to image his jugular vein with the aid of Gennady Padalka, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of a lower body negative pressure countermeasure (Chibis LBNP, controlled by Mikhail Kornienko) used to reverse the headward fluid shift that occurs in the weightlessness environment of space. Credit: NASA.

 

Quote

The astronauts onboard the International Space Station are researching how microgravity affects fluid shifts in a crew member's body. Ground controllers are also guiding Canada's robotic arm into position before next week's grapple and release of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft.

 

The Fluid Shifts experiment will wrap up operations this week with the crew wearing specialized body suits. The suits, known as Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure devices, measure how fluids move from the lower body to the upper body while living in space. The research also observes fluid shifts in and out of cells and blood vessels which may impact head pressure potentially affecting vision.

 

Robotics controllers are remotely guiding the Canadarm2 to the Harmony module where it will grapple Dragon ahead of the spacecraft's May 11 release and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Yesterday, the controllers surveyed the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer's condition with the Canadarm2 and its cameras.

 

Cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka is on his second mission aboard the space station. His first mission during Expedition 25/26 lasted 159 days. Currently, he is Expedition 47 Flight Engineer and today is his 47th day aboard the orbital lab since his March arrival with fellow crew members Jeff Williams and Alexey Ovchinin.

 

Quote

AMS external survey: Last night, Robotics Ground Controllers successfully completed a survey of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) payload from various angles to understand the state of the payload as well as to obtain detailed views of the payload. This evening, controllers will translate the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Work Site 2 (WS2) to WS4. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) will then walk off to Node 2 to perform Dragon Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and re-grapple in preparation for unberth on May 11.

 

Treadmill 2 (T2) software update: Ground teams updated the software on the T2. The regularly scheduled exercise session on T2 after the update was performed nominally.

 

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA1)/Node 1 Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration: Following the PMA1/Node 1 IMV reconfiguration activity on Monday, data indicated that air exchange is still occurring between the Russian segment and the USOS. Today, to limit the air exchange through the PMA, the crew repositioned the Node 1 Overhead Starboard diffuser vanes so the air flows away from the PMA. Additionally, the crew will be reconfiguring the stowage in the PMA to direct the air coming out of the PMA grille toward the Russian Segment. The airflow between the segments is being limited in order to optimize CO2 removal throughout the ISS.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed otherwise noted.
RR ops support
C2V2 checkout
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Thursday, 05/05: Fluid Shifts, Nano Racks Platform 2 module removal, Microbial sample collect
Friday, 05/06: RR CASIS ops, Nano Racks Module 9 ops, Fluid Shifts, Microbial sample collect
Saturday, 05/07: Crew off duty, housekeeping

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA)    Standby
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)    Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab    Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3    Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-4-may-2016.html

 

Space Station Live: Getting the Dirt on Regolith

video is 3:24 min.

 

 

 

 

A Moment with Oleg Skripochka

video is 2:02 min.

 

 

 

------------------------------

 

DIWATA-1 Cubesat Deployed From the Space Station

 

oo26719984606.jpg

DIWATA-1 Cubesat Deployed                  NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: Great to see DIWATA-1, the first Filipino microsatellite, launched today from the International Space Station to observe Earth and climate change.

http://spaceref.com/nasa-hack-space/diwata-1-cubesat-deployed-from-the-space-station.html

 

------------------------------

 

Robotic Arm Inspects Dragon Today amid Advanced Science

 

blog_iss047e044560.jpg

The very bottom tip of Africa is imaged here as captured by the crew of the International Space Station on April 3rd, 2016. South Africa’s capitol Cape Town is located at the bottom left of this beautiful Earth picture captured on a sunny day.

 

Quote

Expedition 47 continues exploring how the lack of gravity affects astronauts and technology to help NASA plan longer missions farther out into space. Meanwhile, the Canadian Space Agency’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, has been maneuvered into position before it releases the SpaceX Dragon on Wednesday.

 

The crew set up the Fluid Shifts experiment again today utilizing a specialized body suit. The suit measures fluid movements between the upper and lower body. These fluid shifts have been known to increase head pressure potentially affecting a crew member’s eyesight.

 

Surface and air samples were taken today inside the International Space Station to study the diversity of microbes on the orbital lab. Hardware was also set up to download imagery taken for the Strata-1 study which is exploring how soil from other planetary bodies might behave. That research may help scientists design future spacesuits and space gear.

 

SpaceX is getting ready for the release and splashdown of its Dragon cargo craft on May 11. The 57.7-foot Canadarm2 robotic arm is inspecting Dragon’s thermal protection system and will grapple the spacecraft later today.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/05/robotic-arm-inspects-dragon-today-amid-advanced-science/

 

-------------------------

 

Expedition 47 Return Extended to 18 June to Support 'Heavy Scientific Research Work'

 

iss47.jpg

Commander Tim Kopra (front right) has led Expedition 47 since March. He and his crewmates Tim Peake and Yuri Malenchenko will now depart the International Space Station (ISS) on 18 June. Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

 

Quote

The incumbent Expedition 47 core crew of the International Space Station (ISS)—Commander Tim Kopra of NASA, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, and Britain’s first “official” astronaut, Tim Peake—will remain aboard the orbiting laboratory for longer than planned. On Friday, 29 April, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced that the trio will return to Earth aboard their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft on 18 June, almost two weeks later than the original 5 June target. It was noted by ESA that the extension will help to “keep the space station operating at full capacity with six astronauts,” whilst NASA’s Rob Navias added that it allows the International Partners (IPs) to “create efficiencies during a period of heavy scientific research work.” The launch of the next crew, aboard the maiden Soyuz-MS spacecraft, has correspondingly moved from 21 to 24 June.

 

The increment of Kopra, Malenchenko, and Peake has been longer than most. At the time of their launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, last 15/16 December, they were targeted to spend close to six months in space. The inaugural mission of Russia’s fourth-generation Soyuz-MS spacecraft should have flown in March, carrying the second half of the Expedition 47 crew—NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and Russian cosmonauts Alexei Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka—but due to technical issues with the new vehicle it was switched with the last mission of the older-specification Soyuz TMA-M. The first outing of Soyuz-MS, now carrying Russian cosmonaut Anatoli Ivanishin, NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, and Japan’s Takuya Onishi into orbit, was moved from 21 May to 21 June. In order to minimize the amount of time that the ISS would be at a reduced crew of three, the IPs agreed to extend Kopra, Malenchenko, and Peake’s landing date from 5 May to 5 June.

http://www.americaspace.com/?p=93200

 

---------------------------------

 

Late Afternoon View of La Seine From Orbit

 

oo26729733376.jpg

La Seine                       NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: Sun reflecting the route of La Seine winding its way down to Paris North is right. The silhouette of a Soyuz spacecraft covers the southern part of Brittany.

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/late-afternoon-view-of-la-seine-from-orbit.html

 

------------------------------

 

Florida Keys As Seen From Orbit

 

oo26657609542.jpg

Florida Keys                NASA/ESA

 

Quote

Tim Peake: Makes me hungry for Key Lime Pie just looking at this #Florida Credits: ESA/NASA

http://spaceref.com/earth/florida-keys-as-seen-from-orbit.html

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA ISS Space to Ground Weekly Report - 6 May 2016

 

nasa_iss_weekly_weekly_space_to_ground_0

NASA ISS Space to Ground Weekly Report - 6 May 2016.             NASA

 

Quote

NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-iss-space-to-ground-weekly-report---6-may-2016.html

 

Space to Ground: Every Picture Tells a Story: 05/06/2016

video is 2:20 min.

 

 

 

----------------------------

 

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 5 May 2016

 

Quote

Expedition 47 continues exploring how the lack of gravity affects astronauts and technology to help NASA plan longer missions farther out into space. Meanwhile, the Canadian Space Agency's robotic arm, Canadarm2, has been maneuvered into position before it releases the SpaceX Dragon on Wednesday.

 

The crew set up the Fluid Shifts experiment again today utilizing a specialized body suit. The suit measures fluid movements between the upper and lower body. These fluid shifts have been known to increase head pressure potentially affecting a crew member's eyesight.

 

Surface and air samples were taken today inside the International Space Station to study the diversity of microbes on the orbital lab. Hardware was also set up to download imagery taken for the Strata-1 study which is exploring how soil from other planetary bodies might behave. That research may help scientists design future spacesuits and space gear.

 

SpaceX is getting ready for the release and splashdown of its Dragon cargo craft on May 11. The 57.7-foot Canadarm2 robotic arm is inspecting Dragon's thermal protection system and will grapple the spacecraft later today.

 

Quote

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPs) Inspection: The crew audited the PEPs hardware to verify that the emergency response equipment is in the expected location and is free of damage. Among the items that were inspected were Water Mist Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA) including Quick Don mask Assemblies (QDMAs) and Pre-Breathe Masks.

 

Dragon Cargo Transfer Status: The crew has completed 38:40 hours of cargo transfer with ~6 hours of transfer remaining to be completed.

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA1)/Node 1 Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration: Following up on the crew's activity yesterday to reposition the Node 1 Overhead Starboard diffuser vanes so the air flows away from the PMA, today the crew covered the IMV diffuser at NOD1OS4 with Gray Tape and constructed a cone around the diffuser section of PMA1 ducting such that air is redirected back towards the RS. The airflow between the segments is being limited in order to optimize CO2 removal throughout the ISS.

 

Robotics operations: Ground controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) in order to gather imagery of defects which had been intentionally created on the SpX-8 Thermal Protection System (TPS). This was to demonstrate the viability of performing and noticing a defect for future crew vehicles. Then the ground team grappled the SpX-8 dragon capsule in preparation for unberth and release scheduled for May 11.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
MSS ops
C2V2 checkout
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 05/06: RR CASIS ops, Nano Racks Module 9 ops, Fluid Shifts, Microbial sample collect
Saturday, 05/07: Crew off duty, housekeeping
Sunday, 05/08: Crew off duty, Polar transfer

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Standby
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-5-may-2016.html

 

A Moment with Aleksey Ovchinin

Video is 1:50 min.

 

 

 

-----------------------------

 

NASA Selects SBIR Projects to Enhance Manufacturing on ISS

 

Quote

NASA has selected five proposals designed to enhance activities aboard the International Space Station for Small business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I awards.

 

Three of the proposals would enhance manufacturing aboard the orbiting laboratory. A fourth proposal would recycle wast plastic for 3D printing, and the fifth would improve the monitoring of air quality.

 

The five proposals include:

 

Space Facility for Orbital Remote Manufacturing (SPACEFORM)
Orbital Fiber Optic Production Module
Sintered Inductive Metal Printer with Laser Exposure
ERASMUS: Food Contact Safe Plastics Recycler and 3D Printer System
MEMS-Based Sensor for Monitoring Cabin Air Quality on the ISS


Full descriptions of the proposals follow.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/05/07/iss-sbirs/

 

-----------------------------------

 

National Astronaut Day Launches with New 'Signature' Space Pens

 

national-astronaut-day-spacepen01.jpg?in

National Astronaut Day, celebrated annually on May 5, includes a new line of space pens for its inaugural commemoration.

Credit: Uniphi Space Agency/collectSPACE.com

 

Quote

The first annual National Astronaut Day has arrived, and with it, a new line of space pens.

 

Founded by Uniphi Space Agency, a talent and marketing agency representing 20 former NASA astronauts, National Astronaut Day is aimed at providing inspiration by sharing the stories and experiences of America's space explorers.

 

For this first year, the celebration is also being marked by a new partnership with Fisher Space Pen to offer a unique line of pressurized writing instruments featuring astronauts' engraved autographs. The sale of the space pens benefits [Freedom 7: Alan Shepard Becomes the First American in Space (Video)] 

 

"Each astronaut took a unique path but all have a common vision to share their experiences to make the world, and beyond, better for us all," said Annie Balliro, president and CEO of Uniphi Good, the parent to Uniphi Space Agency. "In keeping with the true 'astronaut spirit,' it was mission critical to include a cornerstone of philanthropy for National Astronaut Day."

 

The unofficial holiday — Astronaut Day is not recognized by the government — coincides with the anniversary of the United States' first human spaceflight in 1961. Since Alan Shepard's Mercury launch 55 years ago Thursday (May 5), more than 330 American men and women have ventured beyond the Earth's atmosphere.

 

"It wasn't by accident that we chose to go ahead and have this on the anniversary of Al Shepard [becoming] the first American in space," said Mark Polansky, a former NASA space shuttle commander. "Similar to Yuri's Night — taking nothing away from the accomplishments of that program and the first human in space — we hope that this is a way too, to inspire a lot of kids about what happened and bring that into the classroom."

 

Yuri's Night, the "world space party" held annually on April 12, was founded and is continued to be run by a group of volunteers as an extension to Russia's Cosmonautics Day. Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin preceded Shepard into space by two weeks, becoming the first human to orbit the Earth on April 12, 1961.

 

There are no parties on National Astronaut Day, but Uniphi Space Agency is offering other means to celebrate.

http://www.space.com/32799-national-astronaut-day-space-pens.html

 

I did a post, a while back, on the origins of the true "Fisher space pen"...I thought it was a neat story, but here is the link...

Fisher space pen origins

 

-----------------------

 

View of the North Pole On Wednesday Afternoon

 

oo26746021751.jpg

North Pole               NASA

 

Quote

NASA Operation IceBridge captured this view from 500 meters about the North Pole Taken on May 4th.

So what are you seeing? That's sea ice, with a few ridges and a bit of snow cover, and with a few small cracks, almost leads in the ice. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Operation IceBridge/Eric Fraim

http://spaceref.com/arctic-2/view-of-the-north-pole-on-wednesday-afternoon.html

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sources are a bit slow for the start of the week, few bits here....

 

ISS Daily Summary Report – 05/06/16

 

Quote

Rodent Research-3 (RR-3) Bone Densitometer Scans: Following the completion of ten bone densitometer scans earlier this week, the crew transferred the rodents from the habitats, configured Ultrasound 2, and have conducted the remaining ten bone densitometer scans with support from ground teams. This is the final of three planned sessions this week to study the molecular and physical changes to the musculoskeletal system that happen in space. Results will expand scientists’ understanding of muscle atrophy and bone loss in space while testing an antibody that has been known to prevent muscle wasting in mice on Earth.

 

Microbial Observatory-1 Operations: Microbial Observatory -1 sample collections scheduled this week were completed when the crew took surface and air samples using various devices in multiple locations and photographing each location prior to sample collections. The investigation monitors the types of microbes present on ISS over a one-year period. Samples are returned to Earth for further study, enabling scientists to understand the diversity of the microbial flora on the ISS and how it changes over time.

 

Fluid Shifts Closeout Operations in the Service Module: Following yesterday’s successful completion of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) and Cerebral Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) tests, today crewmembers completed the Fluid Shifts experiment run by de-configuring the CCFP analyzer and the DPOAE hardware after performing a data transfer in the Service Module (SM). The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three one-week segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

 

NanoRack Module 9: The fourth NanoRack Module 9 experiment session was completed earlier this morning. The crew activated, deactivated, and shook the mixture tubes to facilitate the experiment. Module-9 is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. The investigation consists of several science experiments flown in a NanoRacks Module on board the ISS.

 

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA1)/Node 1 Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration: Following PMA1/Node 1 IMV reconfiguration on Monday, data indicated we were still getting air exchange with the Russian Segment (RS).  Yesterday the crew covered the IMV diffuser at Node 1 Overhead Starboard 4 and constructed a cone around the diffuser section of PMA1 ducting resulting in air being redirected back to the RS to limit the air exchange through the PMA.  Overnight, significant separation was observed with an increase in RS ppCO2 (peak ~3.7 mmHg) and a decline of the USOS 24-hour average. Teams will continue monitoring CO2 at multiple locations throughout ISS.

 

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Conductivity: Ground teams are monitoring recent erratic conductivity data from the UPA distillate that triggered the system to reprocess during yesterday’s run, affecting the total distillate production.  Today’s two process cycles appeared to be nominal. Teams will continue monitoring UPA performance over the weekend and evaluate potential cause for the high conductivity and its erratic signature.

 

Quote

Ground Activities

All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

Fluid Shifts ops support
RR ops support
Nominal ground commanding
 

Three-Day Look Ahead:

Saturday, 05/07: Crew off duty, housekeeping

Sunday, 05/08: Crew off duty

Monday, 05/09: Dragon OBT, CUCU/CCP checkout, RR habitat restock, Space Pup, Sprint

 

QUICK ISS Status – Environmental Control Group:

                              Component    Status
Elektron    On
Vozdukh    Manual
[СКВ] 1 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV1”)    Off
[СКВ] 2 – SM Air Conditioner System (“SKV2”)    On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab    Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3    Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab    Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3    Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA)    Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)    Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab    Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3    Full Up

https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2016/05/06/iss-daily-summary-report-050616/

 

-----------------------------

 

Dragon Finalizing Departure Preps

 

blog_exp47_050916.jpg

The SpaceX Dragon is in the center right of the image attached to the Harmony module. The Japanese Kibo lab module, with its robotic arm and Exposed Facility, dominates the foreground. Credit: NASA TV

 

Quote

The SpaceX Dragon is being packed with critical science today and tomorrow before its release and splashdown on Wednesday. The crew is also reviewing Dragon departure procedures and training for its release from the grip of the Canadarm2 robotic arm.

 

Dragon is currently attached to the Harmony module. After it is uninstalled early Wednesday with the 57.7 foot Canadarm2, the Dragon will be released at 9:18 a.m. EDT for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean at 2:55 p.m. NASA TV will broadcast the release and departure activities live, however the splashdown and recovery work will not be televised.

 

A pair of science freezers carrying experiment samples for analysis will be removed from the space station and returned to Earth inside Dragon. The commercial space freighter is returning a variety of science and gear for NASA.

 

The Russian cosmonauts are relaxing today in observance of Victory Day when Germany surrendered to the Soviet Union on May 9, 1945, ending World War II. The astronauts in the U.S. segment of the station continued science work, Dragon packing and robotics training for Wednesday’s release activities.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/09/dragon-finalizing-departure-preps/

 

-----------------------------

 

NASA TV to Broadcast Dragon Departure from International Space Station

 

Quote

WASHINGTON, May 5, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --After delivering almost 7,000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station, including the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is set to leave the orbital laboratory with valuable science research and return to Earth on Wednesday, May 11. NASA Television will provide live coverage of Dragon's departure beginning at 9 a.m. EDT.

 

The Dragon spacecraft, which arrived at the station April 10, will be detached from the Earth-facing side of the station's Harmony module using the Canadarm2 robotic arm, operated by ground controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. Robotics controllers will maneuver Dragon into place and Expedition 47 robotic arm operator Tim Peake of ESA (European Space Agency) will execute the command for its 9:18 a.m. release.

 

Dragon will fire its thrusters three times to move to a safe distance from the station before being commanded to begin its deorbit burn about 2 p.m.

 

The capsule will splash down in the Pacific Ocean about 2:55 p.m. The deorbit burn and splashdown will not be broadcast on NASA TV.

 

A recovery team will retrieve the capsule and its more than 3,700 pounds of return cargo, including samples from ongoing space station research, which ultimately will be shipped to laboratories for further study. This cargo includes samples from human research, biology and biotechnology studies, physical science investigations and education activities sponsored by NASA and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the nonprofit organization that manages research aboard the U.S. national laboratory portion of the space station. The spacecraft also will return the final batch of human research samples from the one-year crew mission.

 

In the event of adverse weather conditions in the Pacific, the backup departure and splashdown date is Saturday, May 14.

 

Dragon, the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return to Earth intact, launched April 8 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, for the company's eighth NASA-contracted commercial resupply mission to the station.

 

For NASA TV scheduling and video streaming information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/prnewswire-space-news.html?rkey=20160505DC91540&filter=1639

 

--------------------------------

 

ISS Calendar

 

Quote

DateEvent

 

May 11, 2016 Dragon SpX-8 Departure & Landing

 

May 2016 Flock-2e-Prime, STMSAT-1, MinXSS CubeSat Deployment

 

May 25/26, 2016BEAM Module Expansion

 

May 27, 2016Cygnus OA-6 Unberthing, Release

 

June 18, 2016Soyuz TMA-19M Undocking & Landing (Malenchenko, Kopra, Peake)

 

June 24, 2016Soyuz MS Launch & Docking (Ivanishin, Onishi, Rubins)

 

June 24, 2016Dragon SpX-9 Launch atop Falcon 9

 

June 26, 2016Dragon SpX-9 Rendezvous, Capture & Berthing to Harmony

http://spaceflight101.com/iss/iss-calendar/

 

-------------------------

 

NASA Selects ISRU Projects for SBIR Awards

 

Quote

NASA has selected eight research projects focused on in-situ resource utilization for funding under its Small Business Innovation Research Phase I program.

 

The selected projects include:

 

Extraterrestrial Metals Processing — Pioneer Astronautics
Robotic ISRU Construction of Planetary Landing and Launch Pad — Honeybee Robotics
Extruded Clay-Based Regoliths for Construction on Mars, Phobos and NEAs — Deep Space Industries
In-Situ Generation of Polymer Concrete Construction Materials — Luna Innovations
ISP3: In-Situ Printing Plastic Production System for Space Additive Manufacturing — Altius Space Machines
Compact In-Situ Polyethylene Production from Carbon Dioxide — Opus 12
Micro-Channel Reactor for Processing Carbon Dioxide to Ethylene — Reactive Innovations
OpenSWIFT-SDR for STRS Polyethylene Production from In-Situ Resources in Microchannel Reactors — TDA Research


Full descriptions of the projects are below.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/05/08/nasa-selects-isru-projects-sbir-awards/

 

Detailed descriptions at the above link...most of them are real good...Mars related....:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dragon Packed for Return to Earth Wednesday

 

blog_iss047e079902.jpg

The Expedition 47 crew poses for the 3 millionth image taken aboard the International Space Station.

 

Quote

The SpaceX Dragon cargo ship is ending its stay tomorrow at the International Space Station. The commercial cargo craft has been packed with about 3,700 pounds of cargo, spacewalk gear and biological samples for analysis on Earth.

 

Astronauts Tim Peake and Jeff Williams will be at the controls of the Canadarm2 robotic arm when the command to release Dragon is given at 9:18 a.m. EDT/1:18 p.m. UTC. Dragon will parachute to a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean a few hours later for recovery by SpaceX personnel. NASA TV will televise the release and departure activities starting at 9 a.m.

 

While the astronauts in the U.S. segment loaded Dragon, their Russian counterparts conducted research exploring diverse fields such as physics, biology and human research. They researched how space radiation affects materials that simulate human tissue for the long-running Matryeshka study. The crew also looked at how the space environment affects a crew member’s carotid artery and immune system.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/10/dragon-packed-for-return-to-earth-wednesday/

 

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/05/10/dragon-returns-earth-wednesday/

 

------------------------------

 

Science in Short: Rodent Research, RNA and Omics Overview

 

Quote

Last week had some really exciting research “firsts” on the International Space Station as we continue to provide state-of-the art laboratory equipment and techniques for research in orbit.

 

On May 3, astronauts successfully completed a functional assessment of grip strength in mice on the orbiting laboratory. This was the first time a grip strength meter has been used for rodent research on orbit, and the data gathered will be used to assess the efficacy of the anti-myostatin treatments in preventing muscle loss in space.

 

Crew members also took measurements of bone densitometry on mice for only the second time in space. To date, whether studying the astronaut crew or mice, we have only been able to do bone scans before and after flight. We are now able to look at loss of bone during the course of the mission. The mice were sedated so that they could undergo bone densitometry scanning. Following the scanning, the mice were given another dose of either anti-myostatin or control antibody.

 

The work is being done as part of the Rodent Research-3 experiment conducted by Eli Lilly to understand the relationship between muscle atrophy and bone loss. Eli Lilly joins other pharmaceutical companies, including Merck and Amgen, in using the space station as a source of research innovation.

 

The orbiting laboratory also made progress in molecular biology capabilities with the operation of a qPCR machine to take sample in orbit, extract RNA, and set up reactions that record gene expressions in real time. Called Wetlab-2, the validation test sessions were completed on May 2 using samples of (benign) E. coli and mouse liver tissue, resulting in science-quality data. The WetLab-2 qPCR facility is now available for scientists who need this capability in life science and biomedical research on the space station.

 

Quote

If you are struggling with terms like “omics” and “gene expression,” NASA has released a set of videos to help explain why this area of research is such an important part of the Twins Study.

 

The series explains in friendly terms about omics, its significance in the Twins Study on the space station, and the advantages of personalized medicine for astronauts and humans on Earth. The video’s release was in honor of National DNA Day and a HREC Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) online event on April 25, 2016.

 

Twins Study principal investigators and astronaut Kjell Lindgren served as subject matter experts for the event and responded to online questions from the public.

 

The event garnered 3,884 karma points and 672 comments. The series explores space through you by using omics to look more closely at individual health. The series is divided into sub-disciplines:

 

Video 1 – Omics introduction
• Video 2 – Genomics
• Video 3 – Transcriptomics
• Video 4 – Proteomics
• Video 5 – Epigenomics

• Video 6 – Metabolomics
• Video 7 – Microbiomics
• Video 8 – Omics overview/conclusion

 

Plans are to release videos 6 and 7 when astronaut Kate Rubins sequences DNA in space for the first time later this summer. The final video will be released in conjunction with National Twins Day in August.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/2016/05/10/science-in-short-rodent-research-rna-and-omics-overview/

 

Video #1 to #5 are at this link...

https://www.nasa.gov/content/exploring-space-through-you-omics

 

(Video 1 of 8) Introduction to Omics: 360 Degree View of You

video is 4:47 min.

 

 

 

(Video 2 of 8) Genomics: Genome, The Long and Winding Road

video is 4:06 min.

 

 

 

(Video 3 of 8) Transcriptomics: Releasing the Messengers

video is 4:04 min.

 

 

 

(Video 4 of 8) Proteomics: Proteins At Work

video is 4:29 min.

 

 

 

(Video 5 of 8) Epigenomics: Your Epigenome and Environment

video is 4:26 min.

 

-------------------------------------

 

Fort McMurray Fires
Alberta, Canada

4 days ago

 

Quote

Smoke shrouds Fort McMurray. Planet imagery of areas affected by the fire is available under an open license. Access it here. Labels © OpenStreetMap contributors.

https://www.planet.com/gallery/fort-mcmurray/

 

fort-mcmurray-web.jpg

Fort McMurray Fires                Planet Labs Inc.

https://www.planet.com/pulse/fort-mcmurray-wildfire/

 

:(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Todays news primarily focused on SpaceX Dragon return....

 

Dragon Released Full of Science for Return to Earth

 

exp47_dragon_release2.jpg

Cameras on the Canadarm2 show the SpaceX Dragon as it departs the vicinity of the space station just after its release. Credit: NASA TV

 

Quote

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was released from the International Space Station’s robotic arm at 9:19 a.m. EDT. The capsule will begin a series of departure burns and maneuvers to move beyond the 656-foot (200-meter) “keep out sphere” around the station and begin its return trip to Earth.

 

The capsule is currently scheduled to splashdown in the Pacific Ocean at 2:55 p.m., about 261 miles southwest of Long Beach, California.

 

The spacecraft will return the final batch of human research samples from former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly’s historic one-year mission. These samples will be analyzed for studies such as Biochemical Profile, Cardio Ox, Fluid Shifts, Microbiome, Salivary Markers and the Twins Study.

 

Additional samples taken on the ground as Kelly continues to support these studies will provide insights relevant for the Journey to Mars as NASA learns more about how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, isolation, radiation and the stress of long-duration spaceflight.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/11/dragon-released-full-of-science-for-return-to-earth/

 

--------------------------

 

Dragon Splashes Down Safely to Complete CRS-8

 

Quote

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 2:51 p.m. EDT, about 261 miles southwest of Long Beach, California, marking the end of the company’s eighth contracted cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station.

 

A boat will take the Dragon spacecraft to a port near Los Angeles, where some cargo will be removed and returned to NASA within 48 hours. Dragon will be prepared for a return journey to SpaceX’s test facility in McGregor, Texas, for processing. Dragon is currently the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return a significant amount of cargo to Earth at this time.

 

Dragon is returning more than 3,700 pounds of NASA cargo and science samples from a variety of technological and biological studies about the International Space Station. The Microchannel Diffusion study, which investigated fluids at the nanoscale, or atomic level, holds promise for a wide range of technologies. Nanofluidic sensors could measure the makeup of space station air, or be used to deliver drugs to specific places in the body, for example. This type of research is possible only on the space station, where Earth’s gravity is not strong enough to interact with sample molecules, so they behave more like they would at the nanoscale. Knowledge gleaned from the investigation may have implications for drug delivery, particle filtration and future technological applications for space exploration.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2016/05/11/dragon-splashes-down-safely-to-complete-crs-8/

 

-------------------------------

 

 

----------------------

 

NASA Press Release

Critical NASA Science Returns to Earth aboard SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/critical-nasa-science-returns-to-earth-aboard-spacex-dragon-spacecraft

 

 

Mission overview

Dragon’s Comeback Mission Ends with successful Splashdown in the Pacific

http://spaceflight101.com/dragon-spx-8-splashdown/

 

 

Mission overview

CRS-8 Dragon completes ISS mission, splashes down in Pacific

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/05/crs-8-dragon-iss-mission-splashdown-pacific/

 

----------------------------

 

SpaceX CRS-8 dragon ISS undocking and release timelapse 8x

video is 4:30 min.

 

 

 

-------------------------------------

 

Last minute eye candy.....slide show, 15 images with details....:)

Northern Lights Photos: The Amazing Auroras of 2016

http://www.space.com/32610-amazing-auroras-northern-lights-pictures-2016.html

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love that shot of the Dragons' Solar Panels being illuminated by its' Port and Starboard lights as it flipped over to Prograde. That was a great one. :yes: 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 11 May 2016

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_051116_9

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 11 May 2016.             SpaceX

 

Quote

SpaceX's Dragon cargo craft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 2:51 p.m. EDT, about 261 miles southwest of Long Beach, California, marking the end of the company's eighth contracted cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station.

 

A boat will take the Dragon spacecraft to a port near Los Angeles, where some cargo will be removed and returned to NASA within 48 hours. Dragon will be prepared for a return journey to SpaceX's test facility in McGregor, Texas, for processing. Dragon is currently the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return a significant amount of cargo to Earth at this time.

 

Dragon is returning more than 3,700 pounds of NASA cargo and science samples from a variety of technological and biological studies about the International Space Station. The Microchannel Diffusion study, which investigated fluids at the nanoscale, or atomic level, holds promise for a wide range of technologies. Nanofluidic sensors could measure the makeup of space station air, or be used to deliver drugs to specific places in the body, for example. This type of research is possible only on the space station, where Earth's gravity is not strong enough to interact with sample molecules, so they behave more like they would at the nanoscale. Knowledge gleaned from the investigation may have implications for drug delivery, particle filtration and future technological applications for space exploration.

 

Quote

Meteor Software Image Loads and UltraBay Adapter Installation: The crew attempted to load the software image prior to running four Meteor DVDs, however the software load was unsuccessful. The crew reported that the computer could not boot from any device which is consistent with earlier software loading problems. The crew took a picture of the boot screen, left DVD 1 in the laptop and suspended operations. They left the laptop and hard drive connected in Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) and switches to the laptop power supply and WORF were left on to allow for future ground commanded troubleshooting.

 

Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration: As part of the ongoing effort to reduce ppCO2, earlier this morning the crew worked in Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)1 to better direct IMV airflow back into the Russian Segment. This activity consisted of reconfiguration of existing IMV hardware in PMA1 as well as installation of a new IMV Duct Tee and a 5 foot IMV duct.

 

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Checkout: C2V2 checkouts continued today with checkouts of the GPS ancillary data, broadcast ancillary data, audio and video on the return link, plus voice checks with crew and Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL). Testing will conclude tomorrow.

 

Ku Communications Unit (KCU) 1 Audio Video Interface Card (AVIC) failure - Today, the KCU-1 AVIC failed to diagnostic mode. This resulted in a temporary loss of all 6 video downlinks and two of the Space to Ground (S/G) audio channels. Ground controllers performed a reset of the AVIC, and all video downlinks and S/G 3 & 4 links were recovered nominally. This issue was seen once in 2015 and recovered in the same manner.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Dragon departure
Sprint Ultrasound ops
Nominal ground commanding

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Thursday, 05/12: JSSOD M removal/Cubesat deployer insert, Rodent Research, Neuro Mapping
Friday, 05/13: USOS crew off duty as payback for working Russian Victory Day holiday on Monday, May 9
Saturday, 05/14: Crew off duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Idle
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-11-may-2016.html

 

-----------------------------------

 

Space Station Live: Rodent Research Flies Again

video is 6:03 min.

 

 

 

----------------------------------

 

Crew Hits Science After Dragon Returns to Earth

 

exp47_051216_blog.jpg

(From left) Astronauts Jeff Williams, Tim Kopra and Tim Peake spent a few moments today talking to reporters from the Weather Channel and WISC-TV in Madison, Wis. Credit: NASA TV

 

Quote

The Expedition 47 crew members are back at work today conducting research to benefit humans in space and on Earth. While microgravity science is underway on the International Space Station, a series of completed experiments are back on Earth after returning Wednesday inside the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft.

 

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams is configuring the Japanese Kibo lab module today for another deployment of Earth observation nanosatellites scheduled for early next week. Cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka joined British astronaut Tim Peake readying hardware for the Rodent Research study that will observe how muscles and bones are affected by weightlessness.

 

Commander Tim Kopra set up hardware today for the NeuroMapping study that is researching how living in space changes brain structure and function. Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin videotaped crew activities to document living on the station. Veteran cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko explored how natural and man-made phenomena affect the Earth’s atmosphere.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/05/12/crew-hits-science-after-dragon-returns-to-earth/

 

---------------------------------

 

Observing how microbes adapt in a spaceflight environment

 

petri-dish-colonies-fungi-sample-iss-mic

A petri dish contains colonies of fungi grown from a sample collected aboard the International Space Station during the first of the three Microbial Tracking-1 flights. Image courtesy NASA and JPL. 

 

Quote

Many people know that the International Space Station is a unique microgravity research laboratory in low-Earth orbit where astronauts conduct experiments in biology, physics, astronomy and other fields. However, the space station is also ideal for observing Earth microbes - single-cell organisms so tiny that millions can fit into the eye of a needle - in a new environment.

 

Microbial Tracking-1 (MT-1) is a three-part flight investigation that monitors the types of microbes present on the surfaces and in the air of the space station over a one-year period. Sampling microbes multiple times enables scientists to understand the diversity of microbes on the station and how the microbial population varies over time. After astronauts collect microbes, they send samples back to Earth for further study.

 

The first two sets of samples have been returned to Earth and analyzed. The third flight launched on the eighth cargo resupply mission of a SpaceX Dragon capsule to the space station April 8, and will complete the series. The final samples are planned to return on Dragon as soon as May 11.

more at the link...

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Observing_How_Microbes_Adapt_in_a_Spaceflight_Environment_999.html

 

-------------------------------

 

Aboard Dragon....

 

4542582_orig.jpg

NASA file image

 

Quote

Also loaded into Dragon for return was a complete Space Suit, Extravehicular Mobility Unit #3011 that has a storied history after several years aboard ISS. The suit was worn by Luca Parmitano in the July 2013 spacewalk that had to be terminated when a considerable water leak placed Parmitano in a sticky situation with water accumulating around his head. He and fellow EV crew member Chris Cassidy reached the safety of the airlock just in time, leading to an exhaustive investigation into the circumstances of the dangerous water leak.

 

The investigation quickly zeroed in on the now infamous Fan-Pump Separator, a critical component of the suit’s thermal and life support systems. Since the 2013 spacewalk there have been several failures involving Fan Pump Separators during test runs aboard ISS involving different space suits and replacement components flown up to ISS. On the most recent EVA of 3011, Astronaut Tim Kopra reported a small water leak, prompting NASA to take the suit out of rotation and conduct an in-depth inspection on the ground.

http://spaceflight101.com/dragon-spx-8-splashdown/

 

-------------------------

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.