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International Space Station (Updates)

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Unobscured Vision    2,678

Ahh, Key West. Someplace a lot of us in the North would love to be at this time of the year. Toes in the sand, having a sippy-poo of something that cost way too much, relaxing in the tropical weather. Yep. Sounds like a plan, eh folks? :D

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Draggendrop    5,747

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 23 January 2017

 

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Mission controllers are preparing to release Japan's Kounotori cargo ship from the International Space Station at the end of the week. Meanwhile, the Expedition 50 crew is getting ready for a new protein crystal experiment and reconfiguring combustion science gear.

 

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is getting ready to complete its sixth cargo mission to the station. Overnight, robotics controllers maneuvered Canada's 57.7-foot-long robotic arm holding an external pallet with discarded nickel-hydrogen batteries and installed them inside the Japanese cargo ship for disposal.

 

Next, the Canadarm2 will release Japan's HTV-6 resupply ship from the Harmony module Friday for a fiery re-entry back in Earth's atmosphere. The HTV-6 arrived Dec. 13 four days after its launch from the Tanegashima Space Center carrying crew supplies, new science experiments and lithium-ion batteries to upgrade the station's power supply.

 

The California-based space company SpaceX is planning its tenth station cargo mission. The Dragon cargo craft will deliver a new experiment to study protein crystals to help scientists design better drugs to fight diseases. In advance of the Dragon delivery, Astronaut Peggy Whitson set up the Light Microscopy Module with new lenses today to get ready for the new experiment installation.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough is getting the Combustion Integrated Rack ready for the Cool Flames Investigation (CFI). That study will observe how fuels burn at lower temperatures with no visible flames. CFI may engineers develop advanced engines and fuels and improve crew safety.

 

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Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-1 Autostop and Recovery: MELFI-1 went to Autostop mode Friday evening (during crew sleep). The Cold Stowage team performed troubleshooting including a rack reboot but remained in autostop. Failure signature had anomalous values on the 120 and 28 volt inputs, as well as failure statuses on multiple Motor Drive Electronics (MDE) status bits. This is similar to the power supply failures seen in previous Electronic Unit failures (Failures #2, 3 & 5). The decision was made to perform an Electronic Unit swap. The failed unit (S/N 15) was replaced by the MELFI 1 Spare (S/N 11). During the repair activity, the crew released a small amount of ITCS fluid when removing the return line QD from the UIP. The crew corrected the QD with the standard rotate and tap steps. They also noted significant moisture around the water connections at the Brayton motor QDs in the coldbox, however this is expected as the cold lines collect condensate. The crew commented on corrosion around one of the electrical connections in the coldbox area. Photos were taken for review. When installing the Spare EU in the Prime position, the crew was unable to seat the bottom right fastener (#2 in the procedure). The remaining 7 fasteners were connected and the EU is secure in the rack. The warmest temperatures seen per Dewar were: Dewar 1: -75C, Dewar 2: -73.9C, Dewar 3: -76.4C, Dewar 4: +3.5C, and ground teams do not anticipate any loss of science from this EU failure.

 

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 1 Configuration: Earlier today the crew configured the LMM for the Biophysics science runs in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). The Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-1 (ACE-T-1) Module was removed from the FIR then the LMM Control Base and LMM objective lenses were installed and configured inside the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC). Finally the LMM Petri Base was installed into the AFC. LMM Biophysics 1 (The Effect of Macromolecular Transport of Microgravity Protein Crystallization) will launch on SpaceX-10. When installed, investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 1 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. By studying the crystals of a higher quality that can be grown in microgravity, scientists will be able to better understand their structure and how they work.

 

Node 3 (N3) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Research Valve Install: The crew removed the Air Selector Valve (ASV)-104 valve from the N3 CDRA and install a new CDRA Developmental Research Valve. This new Research Valve was developed to improve CDRA valve operational lifetime. The valve was delivered on HTV-6 and has the same interfaces, form, fit and function as the existing valve design. The removed ASV-104 valve will be stowed as an on-orbit spare.

 

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Operations: Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered on the SSRMS and maneuvered it to grapple the H-II Transfer Vehicle 6 (HTV6) External Platform (EP) grappled by the Mobile Base System (MBS) Payload/Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Accommodation (POA). After the POA released the EP, they maneuvered SSRMS to move and insert EP in the HTV6 Unpressurized Logistics Carrier (ULC) where it was latched and SSRMS was maneuvered to release the EP. Finally, SSRMS was maneuvered to perform a survey of the HTV6 Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) unit B before grappling HTV6 Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) in preparation of HTV6 release and re-entry scheduled for Friday 27-January.

 

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Sample Collection: The crew conducted ITCS fluid sampling from the Lab Low Temperature Loop (LTL) sample port. This maintenance is performed periodically to monitor the quality of the water in the ITCS loops.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Node 3 Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Mode Transition to Single MT
Lab MCA Zero Calibration
Activation of N3 AR Rack and leak checks.

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 01/24: Story Time Meniscus, COL CWSA R&R, Fluid Shifts, JEM ITCS Sample, NORS Transfer
Wednesday, 01/25: N3 MCA R&R, Fluid Shifts, N2/Lab ITCS Sample, Eye Exams
Thursday, 01/26: HTV5 (Depart/ROBOT OBTs, Final load, Hatch Closure, Vestibule Demate, CPA Install), Eye Exams, ARED Detent R&R

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Operate
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Standby
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Idle
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Process
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-23-january-2017.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+spaceref%2Fjext+(SpaceRef+-+Space+News+as+it+Happens)

 

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Fluid Studies Today Benefit Astronauts and Kids

 

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The Expedition 50 crew members explored a variety of space phenomena today to help researchers improve life for humans and stimulate children’s curiosity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

 

Scientists are working to understand how fluids behave not just in spacecraft fuel tanks and containers but also inside an astronaut’s body. Microgravity creates a headward flow of fluids that increases pressure on the back of an astronaut’s eyes potentially causing damage and affecting vision.

 

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson and her Soyuz crewmates Oleg Novitskiy and Sergey Ryzhikov explored the effectiveness of a suit that may reverse these upward fluid shifts. Whitson and Novitskiy used a combination of eye exams and ultrasound artery scans on Ryzhikov today while he wore the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) suit today. The LBNP may offset the microgravity-induced fluid shifts possibly reducing the risk of vision changes in space.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough reached out to schoolchildren this morning reading a story book and videotaping a simple fluids experiment. The Story Time From Space series seeks to increase science literacy by engaging students and teachers.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/01/24/fluid-studies-today-benefit-astronauts-and-kids/

 

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Maracaibo, Venezuela January 15, 2017

 

venezuela-20170115-web.jpg

Over three times the length of the Golden Gate Bridge, General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge stretches across a tidal estuary, connecting the city of Maracaibo to greater Venezuela.   Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/venezuela-20170115/

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Draggendrop    5,747

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 25 January 2017

 

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Habitability Software Update: The crew installed updated software on their tablets in support of the Habitability experiment. The iQ&A iPad application will be used to collect questionnaire data for Habitability Experiment. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission's duration impacts how much space crew members need.

 

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Sample Collection: The crew conducted ITCS fluid sampling from the Node 2 (N2) Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) and Low Temperature Loop (LTL) sample ports. They also sampled Columbus ITCS water using the Columbus Coolant Fluid Servicer. These samples will be returned to the ground on SpX-10 for analysis. The return to ground samples are taken once a year to monitor the quality of the water in the ITCS loops.

 

Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Mass Spectrometer Assembly Remove and Replace (R&R): On GMT 2016/286, the Node 3 MCA experienced a shutdown due to a failure in its Mass Spectrometer Assembly. A spare Mass Spectrometer Assembly was launched on HTV-6, and it was used today to replace the failed MCA Mass Spectrometer Assembly in Node 3 (N3).

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Cupola Artificial Vision Unit (AVU) Troubleshooting: Crew set up a video camcorder such that Cupola Remote Workstation (RWS) Mon 1 and 2 are in the video frame. Ground specialists routed the camcorder and AVU video output to the ground, the Cupola AVU was then commanded from the ground to power-up perform a checkout. Several different inputs to the AVU (test pattern, external cameras, both SCU sources) were tried during the checkout, and all resulted in mostly blank displays with small portions of the display occasionally flickering into view. It was concluded that the input to the AVU is not the issue. The problem is likely in the AVU itself. This checkout was to determine the viability of utilizing the computing capacity of this MSS equipment last used for ISS operations in 2007.

 

H-II Transfer Vehicle 6 (HTV6) Departure Preparation: Yesterday the crew completed loading more than 1450 kg of trash into the HTV vehicle. Today they performed a review of the HTV6 departure profile, procedures, and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding HTV6. They also performed Robotics training which consisted of HTV6 release scenarios to allow them to practice techniques for nominal and off nominal situations.

 

Additionally, they removed General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) from the forward side of HTV, and Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lights from the aft side of HTV in preparation for HTV Departure. These will all be stowed on ISS and used as spares. HTV6 is scheduled to unberth from the ISS on Friday 27-January.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
RWS AVU Checkout
Node 3 CDRA Activation
Node 3 MCA Activation

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Thursday, 01/26: HTV5 (Depart/ROBOT OBTs, Hatch Closure, Vestibule Demate, CPA Install), Eye Exams, ARED Detent R&R
Friday, 01/27: HTV Release and Departure, SPHERES Zero Robotics Run
Saturday, 01/28: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Idle
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Standby
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Full Up
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Off

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-25-january-2017.html

 

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NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 26 January 2017 - Crew Studies Vision

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_012617_9

NASA International Space Station On-Orbit Status 26 January 2017 - Crew Studies Vision.   NASA

 

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The Expedition 50 crew is getting ready for Friday morning's release of Japan's sixth cargo craft to visit the International Space Station. The station residents are also continuing to explore how their eyes adapt to living in space for months at a time.

 

The Kounotori HTV-6 resupply ship, from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, is being disconnected from station systems today as it prepares for its departure Friday at 10:30 a.m. EST. Overnight, ground controllers will operate the Canadarm2 and maneuver the HTV-6 away from the Harmony module where it is attached.

 

European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet and Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA will then command the 57.7-foot-long robotic arm to release Kounotori back into orbit. After the HTV supports science experiments for a week, Japanese flight controllers will command the craft to deorbit on Feb. 5 for a fiery reentry into Earth's atmosphere.

 

More Fluid Shifts research took place today as astronauts study the possibility of using a special suit, the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) suit, to prevent the upward flow of fluids towards the head caused by microgravity. This headward flow may be causing pressure on the back of crew members' eyes potentially causing damage and affecting vision.

 

During the afternoon, the crew also participated in ultrasound eye scans. Doctors on the ground assisted the crew to ensure good views of the optic nerve, cornea and back of the eye.

 

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Fluid Shifts Chibis Imaging Day 2: Due to yesterday's issues with the Joint Station LAN (JSL), the final Flight Day 45 Chibis session for the 49S crew was rescheduled and performed this morning. The subject donned the Chibis device, and while the crewmember was exposed to the negative pressure (pulling the fluid feetward), then with ground and onboard operator support they configured the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) hardware, before completing a DPOAE test, OCT exam, and a Tonometry exam. The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Noninvasive techniques are used to assess arterial and venous dimensions and flow parameters, ocular pressure and structure, and changes in intracranial pressure. Lower body negative pressure is being investigated for its ability to mitigate some of the effects of the space flight-induced fluid shift. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight, and assist in the development of countermeasures.

 

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) On-Board Training (OBT): Prior to participating in the SPHERES Zero Robotic Challenge activities on Friday, the crew viewed an OBT video to familiarize themselves with the SPHERES facility. The SPHERES Zero Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

 

H-II Transfer Vehicle 6 (HTV6) Departure Preparations: Earlier today, the crew completed final cargo loading and egressed HTV6. The crew configured the vestibule for demate by removing Air Revitalization System (ARS) jumper, Intermodular Ventilation (IMV) supply jumper, 1553/ENET A and B jumper, and disconnecting the Node 2 HTV channel 2 power jumper. The also installed the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs). HTV-6 unberth activities are scheduled to start tomorrow morning at ~5:30 am CST with vehicle release at ~9:30 am CST.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Sabatier Troubleshooting
N2N CBM Prep for Demate
S-Band String 2 activation

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 01/27: HTV Release and Departure, SPHERES Zero Robotics Run
Saturday, 01/28: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty
Sunday, 01/29: Crew Off Duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Startup
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-international-space-station-on-orbit-status-26-january-2017---crew-studies-vision.html

 

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Sixth Japanese HTV Cargo Ship Leaves Station

 

C3L2dxRWYAERjuM.jpg

The Japanese HTV-6 resupply ship is pictured just before its release on astronaut Shane Kimbrough’s 100th day in space. Credit: @Astro_Kimbrough

 

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Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA commanded the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to release a Japanese cargo vehicle at 10:46 a.m. EST. At the time of release, the station was flying 261 statute miles above the south Atlantic Ocean. Earlier, ground controllers used the robotic arm to unberth the cargo craft.

 

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA’s) H-II Transport Vehicle-6 (HTV-6) arrived to the space station Dec. 13, after launching from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan Dec. 9.

 

The cargo ship will now move to a safe distance below and in front of the station for about a week’s worth of data gathering with a JAXA experiment designed to measure electromagnetic forces using a tether in low-Earth orbit. JAXA is scheduled to deorbit the craft on Feb. 5. Loaded with trash, the vehicle will burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/01/27/sixth-japanese-htv-cargo-ship-leaves-station/

 

Japanese HTV-6 Cargo Spacecraft departs ISS

video is 2:36 min.

 

 

 

HTV-6 Cargo Craft Departs ISS for Week-Long Tether Experiment

 

details-01-512x405.jpg

JAXA

 

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With HTV-6 on its way to depart the Approach Ellipsoid, NASA involvement in the mission ended and the Tsukuba Control Center was back in full control of the flight.

 

HTV-6 is expected to enter an independent orbit around 20 Kilometers below ISS by Friday night to begin a week-long free flight dedicated to the HTV-KITE Experiment.

 

A 700-meter long electrodynamic tether is planned to be deployed from the HTV to test whether thrust generated by a charged tether in the presence of Earth’s magnetic field could be a viable method for the removal of space debris from orbit.

 

Over the course of one week, HTV will go through different experiments with the tether to measure the electromotive force generated by the tether in various modes and spacecraft configurations to assess whether tethers are capable of removing sizeable pieces of debris from orbit using a mostly passive method.

 

When the KITE experiment is complete, HTV-6 will complete a targeted deorbit maneuver on February 5, aiming for a remote corridor of the Pacific Ocean where the spacecraft will re-enter the atmosphere and surviving debris will impact, bringing an end to a very successful cargo mission to the Space Station.

More at the link...

http://spaceflight101.com/htv-6-departs-space-station/

 

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Visiting Vehicle Launches, Arrivals and Departures

 

iss_01-27-17.jpg?itok=F4P_X5iw

Jan. 27, 2017: International Space Station Configuration. Three spacecraft are docked at the station including the Soyuz MS-02 and MS-03 crew vehicles and the Progress 64 resupply ship.

 

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/visiting-vehicle-launches-arrivals-and-departures

 

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Future Space Station Crew Discusses ISS Expedition

 

bresnik.jpg

Veteran spacewalker Randy Bresnik will become the first U.S. Marine Corps officer to command the International Space Station (ISS). Photo Credit: NASA, via Joachim Becker/SpaceFacts.de

 

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Three experienced spacefarers from three nations, with a combined total of almost a year in space, across four previous missions—to say nothing of over 31 cumulative hours of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) to their credit—gathered Wednesday at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, to brief the media on their upcoming voyage to the International Space Station (ISS). Veteran NASA shuttle flyer Randy “Komrade” Bresnik, together with European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli of Italy and Russia’s Sergei Ryazansky, will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft, later this summer. During their multi-month increment, they will initially form the second half of Expedition 52, before Bresnik assumes command of Expedition 53 and celebrates his 50th birthday in orbit in September.

 

The crew composition was initially approved by the Multilateral Crew Operations Panel (MCOP) and formally announced by NASA in May 2016. Originally, Bresnik and Ryazansky were to be joined by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Norishige Kanai and expected to launch aboard Soyuz MS-07 in November 2017. However, as previously outlined by AmericaSpace, Russia decided last summer to reduce its crew complement from three to two cosmonauts from 2017, partly in response to significant delays which have blighted its Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM). As a consequence, cosmonauts Nikolai Tikhonov and Ivan Vagner were deleted from the Soyuz MS-04 and Soyuz MS-06 crew rosters. Since both men were training for the “Flight Engineer-1” position aboard the Soyuz, it became necessary to move their respective flights back by several months, in order that U.S. astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle could be trained and brought up to speed on this critical role.

Much more at the link...

http://www.americaspace.com/?p=97951

 

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Earth from Space: Western Texas

 

esa_earth_from_space_Western_Texas_01271

Earth from Space: Western Texas.   ESA

 

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An area over the western end of the US state of Texas is pictured in this image from the Sentinel-2A satellite from 13 March 2016.

Sentinel-2 is the 'colour vision' satellite mission for Europe's Copernicus environment monitoring programme - the name spawning from its high-resolution multispectral instrument.

 

The scene pictured here, however, is rather devoid of colour owing to the landscape's sparse vegetation cover. Some colour does appear along the rivers and streams where plants thrive more easily. In the upper left, large circles of agriculture from central-pivot irrigation systems appear green.

In the central-left portion of the image, one area appears orange where the land may have a different mineral content.

 

On the upper-right side of the image, we can see a cluster of hills of the Sierra Madera crater, formed less than 100 million years ago when a meteorite hit Earth.

 

In the lower-right corner, we can see a network of oil wells connected via a spiderweb-like structure of supply roads. Underground oil reservoirs usually stretch across large areas, and multiple wells are positioned over the reservoirs to best exploit the natural resource. Texas is the top crude oil-producing state in the US, accounting for about a third of the country's output.

http://spaceref.com/earth/earth-from-space-western-texas.html

 

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# PamyatnayaData year 1967: agreement on the use of outer spacehttp: // www. roscosmos.ru/23169/  

 

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GOING TO SPACE HELPED TEACH THE WORLD TO WORK TOGETHER

 

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NASA WAS FOUNDED ON THE PRINCIPLE THAT "ACTIVITIES IN SPACE SHOULD BE DEVOTED TO PEACEFUL PURPOSES FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL MANKIND"

 

Popular Science and XPRIZE are teaming up to explore and explain technologies like these in a video series called Future First.
In episode fifteen of Future First, we take a look at how the space race helped to foster new international cooperation—even though it started up during the Cold War. The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, which created NASA, is just one example of that spirit of collaboration. The act states that "it is the policy of the United States that activities in space should be devoted to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all mankind." Former NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver tells us more.

http://www.popsci.com/going-to-space-helped-humanity-foster-international-cooperation

 

Cooperation in Space

video is 1:27 min.

 

 

:D

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Draggendrop    5,747

NASA ISS Space to Ground Report - 27 January 2017

 

nasa_iss_weekly_report_012717_945.jpg

NASA ISS Space to Ground Report - 27 January 2017.  NASA

 

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NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

Source (long link..NASA)

 

Space to Ground: Flying a Space KITE: 01/27/2017

video is 2:15 min.

 

 

 

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Video in the twitter post and here is a tube version, low res but "nice clarity"

 

See What A Spacewalker Sees In New HD Video

video is 1:22 min.

 

 

:D

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Draggendrop    5,747

Progress MS-03 to undock from ISS, to be sunken in remote area of Pacific

 

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MOSCOW, January 31. /TASS/. Progress MS-03 spacecraft is to undock from the International Space Station and to deorbit on Tuesday, an official at the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC) told TASS on Monday.


"The undocking of the ship has been scheduled for 17:25 Moscow Standard Time (14:25 UTC) on January 31," he said.


Computations provided by the MCC ballistics service show the spacecraft will begin re-entry of the Earth atmosphere at 21:10 and its fragments that will not have burned in dense atmosphere will reach the surface of the Pacific in a remote area known as the 'spacecraft cemetery' at 21:24.


As a replacement, Progress MS-05 cargo craft will lift off towards the ISS on February 22. The previous cargo carrier, Progress MS-04 was lost in the wake of an accident involving the Soyuz-U launch vehicle on December 1, 2016.


Progress MS-03 cargo craft was launched on July 17, 2016 from the Baikonur Space Center in Kazakhstan. It docked to the station on July 19 and brought there a payload of more than 2 tons, including fuel, air, foodstuffs, equipment essential for the station's functioning, life-supporting equipment, and parcels for the crewmembers.

http://tass.com/science/928066

 

Standard de-orbit/re-entry

 

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Few days behind...new reports due soon.

 

NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 27 January 2017 - JAXA HTV-6 Released, Will Perform Experiments

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_121416_9

NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 27 January 2017 - JAXA HTV-6 Released, Will Perform Experiments.  NASA

 

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Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Commander Shane Kimbrough of NASA commanded the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to release a Japanese cargo vehicle at 10:46 a.m. EST.

 

At the time of release, the station was flying 261 statute miles above the south Atlantic Ocean. Earlier, ground controllers used the robotic arm to unberth the cargo craft.

 

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) H-II Transport Vehicle-6 (HTV-6) arrived to the space station Dec. 13, after launching from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan Dec. 9.

 

The cargo ship will now move to a safe distance below and in front of the station for about a week's worth of data gathering with a JAXA experiment designed to measure electromagnetic forces using a tether in low-Earth orbit. JAXA is scheduled to deorbit the craft on Feb. 5. Loaded with trash, the vehicle will burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

 

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Veg-03: The crew performed nominal thinning and watering of the Chinese Cabbage plants in the Veggie facility. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the Space Shuttle and ISS made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members have used to successfully grow flowers and lettuce in space. Tests determine which types of microorganisms are present in space-grown cabbage, providing baseline data for future crop-growing efforts. Behavioral health surveys assess the impact of growing plants on crew morale and mood.

 

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Pressure Control and Pump Assembly (PCPA) Operations: Today, the crew demated the connection between the Fluid Control and Pump Assembly (FCPA) and PCPA at Quick Disconnect 27 (QD27), which is located on the PCPA. This will help to determine if the FCPA is the source of the high conductivity seen in the UPA distillate. Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) Serial Number (S/N) 2 is currently installed in the UPA. This ARFTA may contain more conductive fluid, so additional data trending is desired with ARFTA S/N 2 installed.

 

Sabatier Restart - Last month, the Sabatier system could not be restarted after being in Standby for an extended period of time. During the attempted restarts, the system showed little to no reaction occurring in the reactor and no water being produced. Yesterday, ground teams executed a procedure to warm up the reactor prior to a restart attempt and successfully restarted the Sabatier. The team believes that the higher temperature and additional duration of the heat soak allowed the reaction to kick off. Water continued to be produced overnight. Teams will continue monitoring Sabatier performance.

 

Today's Planned ActivitiesH-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-6 Departure: This morning, the crew finished closing out the Node 2 vestibule by demating all umbilicals and depressurizing the vestibule between HTV-6 and Node 2 in preparation for the unberth. Commands were sent to the release Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) bolts prior to unberth. Robotic Flight Controllers then maneuvered HTV-6 to the release position utilizing the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). HTV-6 was released at 9:45 am CST. HTV-6 re-entry is scheduled for February 5, 2017. Note: The IMC Daily Summary Report of January 25, 2017 incorrectly reported that both the General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) and Light Emitting Diodes (LED) lights were removed from HTV prior to hatch closure. Only the two GLAs were removed.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Node 2 CBM Demate
HTV-6 Maneuver to Release

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Saturday, 01/28: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty
Sunday, 01/29: Crew Off Duty
Monday, 01/27: Story Time: Light Demo, Cupola ATU Mod Kit, PMA2 Ingress/Stowage, FineMotor, Rapidscat/COL SDX Nadir Troubleshooting

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Manual
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

source

 

------------------------------

 

HTV-6 Released From The International Space Station

 

oo31705670114.jpg

HTV-6 Released   ESA/NASA

 

Quote

Thomas Pesquet: As the sun rises on the International Space Station, we prepare to say farewell to HTV6. 


A fitting end for a Japanese mission. Today HTV-6 leaves us after bringing us many good things. It brought up the batteries we installed during the spacewalk, the satellites we launched last week, fresh food and much more. We have stowed it with trash and it will be on its way later today to burn up harmlessly in our atmostphere. I will be on robotic arm control together with Shane Kimbrough for its release.

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/htv-6-released-from-the-international-space-station.html

 

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Scientists Study Crew Adapting to New Tech

 

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Astronaut Shane Kimbrough is seen inside his spacesuit during a spacewalk on Jan. 13, 2017.  NASA

 

Quote

Scientists are researching how International Space Station astronauts adapt to new technology as NASA prepares to send humans beyond low-Earth orbit. Crew members will have to learn how to operate new types of spacecraft and adjust to planetary surfaces with different microgravity environments.

 

As part of this research, Expedition 50 Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson from NASA and Thomas Pesquet from ESA started Monday morning with an interactive test on an iPad. The test is part of the Fine Motor Skills experiment that observes how astronauts interact with new technologies potentially influencing the design of future spaceships, spacesuits and habitats.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough worked throughout the day on science hardware. He rebooted a computer on the MERLIN science freezer before swapping hard drives on a device that observes meteors entering Earth’s atmosphere. In the afternoon, Kimbrough videotaped himself reading a children’s book and performing a simple light experiment for school kids on Earth.

 

The three cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskiy, Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov, worked in the station’s Russian segment on a variety of science and maintenance tasks. The trio explored the human digestion system and collected blood samples for a bone loss study.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/01/30/scientists-study-crew-adapting-to-new-tech/

 

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Astronaut twin study hints at stress of space travel

 

Quote

Preliminary results are in from NASA’s unprecedented twin study — a detailed probe of the genetic differences between astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a consecutive year in space, and his identical twin Mark. Measurements taken before, during and after Scott Kelly’s mission reveal changes in gene expression, DNA methylation and other biological markers that are likely to be attributable to his time in orbit.

 

From the lengths of the twins’ chromosomes to the microbiomes in their guts, “almost everyone is reporting that we see differences”, says Christopher Mason, a geneticist at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. He and other project scientists reported the early results on 26 January in Galveston, Texas, at a meeting of scientists working in NASA’s Human Research Program. “The data are so fresh that some of them are still coming off the sequencing machines,” Mason says.

 

The challenge now is to untangle how many of the observed changes are specific to the physical demands of spaceflight — and how many might be simply due to natural variations. And because the Kelly twins are just two people, the results may not be generalizable to others.

more at the link...

http://www.nature.com/news/astronaut-twin-study-hints-at-stress-of-space-travel-1.21380

 

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Jeddah, Saudi Arabia January 5, 2017

 

jeddah-20170105-web.jpg

A mid-day view of the Jeddah Island Seaport, home of the United Sugar Company (center-left). Their facilities can refine 1.2 million tons of sugar per year.  Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/jeddah-20170105/

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 30 January 2017 - Preparing for Operations Beyond Low Earth Orbit

 

Quote

Scientists are researching how International Space Station astronauts adapt to new technology as NASA prepares to send humans beyond low-Earth orbit. Crew members will have to learn how to operate new types of spacecraft and adjust to planetary surfaces with different microgravity environments.

 

As part of this research, Expedition 50 Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson from NASA and Thomas Pesquet from ESA started Monday morning with an interactive test on an iPad. The test is part of the Fine Motor Skills experiment that observes how astronauts interact with new technologies potentially influencing the design of future spaceships, spacesuits and habitats.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough worked throughout the day on science hardware. He rebooted a computer on the MERLIN science freezer before swapping hard drives on a device that observes meteors entering Earth's atmosphere. In the afternoon, Kimbrough videotaped himself reading a children's book and performing a simple light experiment for school kids on Earth.

 

The three cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskiy, Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov, worked in the station's Russian segment on a variety of science and maintenance tasks. The trio explored the human digestion system and collected blood samples for a bone loss study.

 

Quote

Pressurized Mating Adaptor (PMA) 2 Ingress: The crew completed a review of the planned PMA2 ingress activities. After gathering hardware, the crew removed stowage from the Node 2 endcone and ingressed PMA2. They removed the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs) that will be installed in the Node 3 Port/PMA 3 vestibule later in the increment in preparation for PMA 3 relocate along with some additional hardware. They installed an IMV Duct that will be used for future docked vehicles. The crew then inspected the PMA for evidence of microbial growth and condensation and evaluated whether a newly designed Hatch Depress Indicator is compatible with the PMA bulkhead. The crew also returned the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Transfer Interface (JOTI) hardware back into the PMA2, which was used during the Robotics External Leak Locator (RELL) demonstration last year, as well as some additional hardware that is not needed in the near term. Finally, they egressed PMA2 and returned the stowage to the Node 2 endcone.

 

Cupola Audio Terminal Unit (ATU) Modification Kit Installation: The crew removed the existing Cupola ATU coldplate hardware and installed modified hardware. The new hardware protrudes less into the Cupola work volume and better protects the ATU flex lines from inadvertent damage.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last year, the Columbus Module experienced a power anomaly when a subset of Power Distribution Unit -1 (PDU-1) outlets went unexpectedly to OFF. Among the equipment that suddenly lost power was the RapidScat Feeder#1. The RapidScat power up troubleshooting attempts were not successful. The new ESA payload Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM), arriving on SpX-13, is currently planned for installation at the RapidScat site, therefore the electrical components of the payload site need to be tested to ensure that this location is fully operational. Today ground controllers removed RapidScat from the Columbus External Platform and then demated the electrical connector on the adapter plate to allow for troubleshooting of the interface. Based on the troubleshooting, the payload site on Columbus has been cleared, and the fault is isolated to RapidScat. Once the troubleshooting was completed, the ground controller mated the adapter plate connector and re-installed RapidScat.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Rapidcat/COL SDX Nadir Troubleshooting

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 01/31: MSL SCA Exchange, Story Time: Pendulous; Lab CDRA T/S Cable Install, SPHERES SLOSH Tank Maintenance, MPEP/SAM removal, Haptics, RADIN Deploy
Wednesday, 02/01: ROBONAUT Troubleshooting, PAO 4K Superbowl D/L, SPHERES Tether, CAST Session #3, PBRE Exchange, MSG Front Window
Thursday, 02/02: Body Measures, SPHERES HALO, EML, BEAM Ingress

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

SpaceRef source

 

-----------------------------

 

Russian Space Freighter Leaves Station

 

ISS_01-31-17.jpg

The departure of the Russian Progress 64 cargo craft leaves two Soyuz spaceships docked at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

 

Quote

The Russian 64 Progress cargo vehicle undocked from the Pirs docking compartment at 9:25 a.m. EST. The Russian Progress 64 arrived at the space station July 18, after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan July 17. After more than six months at the station, the spacecraft is scheduled to deorbit at 12:34 p.m. where it will burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/01/31/russian-space-freighter-leaves-station/

 

-----------------------------

 

JAPANESE TETHER EXPERIMENT HITS SNAG

 

Quote

An electrodynamic tether experiment being conducted by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has apparently run into some problems, according to The Japan Times.

 

The tether, called Kounotori Integrated Tether Experiment or KITE, was attached to the outside of the Japanese Kounotori 6 cargo spacecraft, which departed from the International Space Station Jan. 27, 2017, after six weeks attached to the orbiting lab.

 

KITE is composed of a 2,300-foot (700-meter) long tether made from thin wires of stainless steel and aluminium and a 44-pound (20-kilogram) end-mass. It was supposed to be deployed soon after leaving the station, but according to France 24, the Japanese space agency is unsure if the device actually deployed. There has been no official word as to what might have gone wrong.

 

The space agency said it has until Saturday, Feb. 4, to work the problem and conduct the experiment. On Feb. 5, the cargo ship is expected to perform a destructive re-entry over the south Pacific Ocean.

 

After leaving the outpost, Kounotori 6 was commanded to go to a safe distance of about 12 miles below and 23 miles ahead of the outpost. KITE was then supposed to deploy to its full length and spend a week extended. A current of no more than 10 milliamps was expected to run through the tether to demonstrate how it could affect the orbit of an object. The hope is this technology could be used to help remove space debris in the future.

 

Kounotori 6 launched Dec. 9, 2016, and spent a week catching up to the ISS. It was berthed to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module Dec. 13. Over the next six weeks, cargo in the pressurized section was unloaded and replaced with trash and unneeded equipment.

 

The unpressurized section contained six lithium-ion batteries that were installed in early January 2017 via a combination of ground-controlled robotics activities and two spacewalks. The batteries replaced 12 nickel-hydrogen units, nine of which were placed inside the unpressurized section of Kounotori 6 for disposal upon re-entry.

 

tether_wide-7df993d119ce90551d025d339eae

An artist’s rendering of the KITE electrodynamic tether experiment. The Japanese space agency has until Saturday to deploy the experiment. Image Credit: JAXA
 

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/japanese-tether-experiment-hits-snag/

 

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Quote

Cargo vehicle # ProgressMS03 nominally reduced from orbit and sunk in the Pacific Ocean. 

 

 

 

 

Quote

The process of detaching the cargo ship # ProgressMS03 from the International Space Station. Cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky Photos.

 

 

 

 

Quote

Cargo ship # ProgressMS03 undocked from the ISS, "Pierce" module. Flooding in the non-navigational area of the Pacific Ocean is expected at 21:24 MSK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C3hJhyEWcAI_Dts.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Brussels, Belgium January 19, 2017

 

brussels-20170119-web.jpg

The winter landscape in Brussels complements the red clay roofs of historic Quartier des Squares (center) and the white tops of the Royal Museum of the Armed Forces (center-right).  Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/brussels-20170119/

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 31 January 2017 - Progress 64 Leaves the ISS

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_image_01

he departure of the Russian Progress 64 cargo craft leaves two Soyuz spaceships docked at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.

 

Quote

The Russian 64 Progress cargo vehicle undocked from the Pirs docking compartment at 9:25 a.m. EST. The Russian Progress 64 arrived at the space station July 18, after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan July 17.

 

After more than six months at the station, the spacecraft is scheduled to deorbit at 12:34 p.m. where it will burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

 

Quote

Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) and Small Fine Arm Attachment Mechanism (SAM) Removal: The crew extended the JEM Airlock (JEMAL) slide table into the cabin and removed the MPEP and SAM facilities. On Thursday, the JEMAL will be depressed and the empty Slide Table will be extended. Ground controllers will be removing an Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) from the JEM External Facility (EF) and installing it on the Slide Table to make space on the EF for the High Definition Television Camera -Exposed Facility 2 (HDTV-EF2) experiment. HDTV-EF2 is a high-definition television camera system, which is used for earth observation from the ISS.

>

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Modal Test Preparation: In preparation for Thursday's BEAM modal test, the crew gathered and configured the necessary equipment including Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) sensors and video cameras. BEAM is an experimental expandable capsule attached to the Node 3 aft Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) port. The BEAM investigation will run approximately 2 years. BEAM is not an occupied module, and not used for stowage. During this time, BEAM is constantly monitored for temperature, pressure, and radiation. Periodically, four times per year, the ISS crew enters the module to collect data and check on its structural condition. Following the BEAM investigation, the module will be released from the ISS and burn up on reentry into the atmosphere.

>

Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) Exchange: The crew performed an exchange of the SCAs, replacing the used cartridge with the next in the series, Solidification along an Eutectic Path in Ternary Alloys (SETA)2-#9. The SETA investigation looks at how two phases that form together organize into lamellar, or fiber, structures when cooling Aluminum (Copper-Silver Alloys). Both, the SETA and Metastable Solidification of Composites (METCOMP) projects provide benchmark samples that will enable numerical model tests that aim to predict these structures.

 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Valve Power Cable Installation: Due to the intermittent Remote Power Controller (RPC) trip on the Lab CDRA, the CDRA Valve Power Cable was installed in order to isolate this trip. The six valves within CDRA are currently all powered from a single RPC. This new cable will initially power half of the six valves via a different RPC. Based on the results of the troubleshooting, the cable will be reconfigured to further isolate the trip source.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
64P Undock support

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 02/01: ROBONAUT Troubleshooting, SPHERES Tether, CAST Session #3, PBRE Exchange, MSG Front Window
Thursday, 02/02: Body Measures, SPHERES HALO, EML, BEAM Modal test
Friday, 02/03: SPHERES HALO, EFU Adapter Install

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Startup
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

Spaceref.com source

 

-------------------------

 

Astronauts Welcome Super Bowl Fans and Explore Gut Microbes

 

exp50_020117_blog.jpg

Astronauts Peggy Whitson and Shane Kimbrough called down to Houston and welcomed football fans to Super Bowl LI festivities. Credit: NASA/James Blair

 

Quote

A pair of NASA astronauts on the International Space Station called down to Houston today as the city gets ready to host Super Bowl LI on Sunday.

 

Johnson Space Center officials, media and visitors gathered at Space Center Houston to hear Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson and Commander Shane Kimbrough welcome everyone as NASA participates in Super Bowl festivities this week.

 

As NASA and the city of Houston welcome football fans, the Expedition 50 crew aboard the International Space Station continued advanced space research to benefit humans on Earth and in space.

 

The astronauts explored how the immune system adapts in outer space by collecting their biological samples for the Multi-Omics study. The experiment, which began in March 2015 when the One-Year mission began, is researching gut microbes and metabolism to determine how living in space affects the human immune function.

 

Scientists and engineers are using the station as a platform to explore technologies for removing space debris from Earth orbit and returning samples from planetary surfaces. The crew members set up tiny internal multi-use satellites known as SPHERES to demonstrate capturing a space object and tugging it. Researchers are testing software to improve computer models to make space safer from space junk and improve planetary science.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/01/astronauts-welcome-super-bowl-fans-and-explore-gut-microbes/

 

-----------------------

 

A Japanese Space Junk Removal Experiment Has Failed in Orbit

 

Quote

An experimental space junk "collector" has glitched during its first orbital test.

 

The system, designed by the Japanese space agency (JAXA) and a fishing net company, should have unfurled a 700-meter (2,300 ft) tether from a space station resupply vehicle that was returning to Earth. According to JAXA scientists, however, the system appears to have faltered.

 

Space junk is a growing problem in low-Earth orbit. Since the beginning of the space age, debris as small as flecks of paint and as large as whole satellites and parts of rocket boosters have been accumulating and it is estimated that over 100 million individual pieces of junk (tens of thousands of pieces that are over 10 centimeters in size) are whizzing around our planet.

 

Quote

So, in an effort to counter this growing threat, JAXA hoped to test a electrodynamic tether that is attached to the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) — called "Kounotori-6." The Kounotori Integrated Tether Experiments (KITE) aim is to test the technology behind propelling the cable into space. Once deployed, a fully operational space junk mitigation system incorporating KITE would send the tether out to large pieces of debris, grab onto them and the spacecraft would then pull them down to Earth to be incinerated by our atmosphere.

 

The robotic cargo space vehicle arrived at the International Space Station in December and, after unloading supplies and experiments for the crew, it was reloaded with trash from the orbiting outpost. The vehicle was released from the space station on Friday (Jan. 27) and and is expected to burn up safely in the Earth's upper atmosphere in early February.

 

But before its fiery reentry, the HTV was supposed to extend the tether to see if the space junk removal technique is at least feasible. Alas, it would appear the stainless steel and aluminum cable didn't even get off the starting blocks and wasn't released from the resupply ship.

 

JAXA scientists have said that they will continue to attempt to send commands to the mechanism, but they have very little time left to troubleshoot.

source

 

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Russia open to increased cooperation with the United States on space programs

 

s135e011814-879x485.jpg

Sergei Kislyak, Russian ambassador to the United States, said he believes the ISS is a good model for science and technology cooperation in general between the two nations. Credit: NASA 

 

Quote

WASHINGTON — The Russian ambassador to the United States said Jan. 31 that Russia would be open to enhanced cooperation in space should the Trump administration pursue improved relations between the countries.

 

Ambassador Sergei Kislyak, speaking at a meeting of the American Physical Society here, said that cooperation on space activities is improving in the aftermath of sanctions the U.S. enacted after Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014.

 

“We were notified that NASA wouldn’t be working with us. That was a very bizarre situation. I didn’t understand that,” he said, recalling the restrictions that the U.S. government placed in 2014 on cooperation between NASA and Russia outside of the International Space Station partnership. “But NASA, we need to say, corrected that issue and the collaboration is still continuing pretty well.”

 

There have been signs of increased cooperation between the U.S. and Russia beyond the ISS in recent months. In October, NASA officials traveled to Moscow and met with Russian counterparts about cooperation on Venera-D, a proposed Russian Venus mission planned for the mid-2020s. That resulted in an agreement to continue discussions for two more years to identify specific roles NASA could play on the mission.

 

President Donald Trump has suggested he would seek improved relations with Russia, even as investigations proceed into possible Russian interference in the 2016 election. It’s not clear yet, though, how any warming of relations would extend to space activities.

 

“I think it would be premature for me to speculate as to whether this zone of overlapping interests will increase or decrease,” Kislyak said. “We haven’t heard a new policy yet from the United States.”

 

He suggested, though, there may be opportunities for the countries to cooperate on NASA’s long-term plans for human Mars exploration. “That is moon exploration, which is very much on our agenda. It’s space medicine and many, many other issues,” he said. “Our programs are not identical, but there’s always been a lot of overlap that provides room for serious and significant cooperation.”

“If the U.S. government chooses programs that would be extending that kind of cooperation,” he added, “they will find us to be willing to work with you.”

Kislyak said he considered the ISS a good model for cooperation between the U.S. and Russia on science and technology programs in general. “They advance together the knowledge of mankind. They risk their lives together. They rely on each other in order to be safe and to continue the exploration of space,” he said. “That’s the model we need to strive for.”

Spacenews.com

 

-----------------------

 

PRELEMINARY RESULTS IN NASA TWINS STUDY RELEASED

 

 

Quote

>

Telomeres and Telomerase
Telomeres and Telomerase are part of the chromosomal system in the human body. Susan Bailey reported that for Scott, the flight twin, the length of his white blood cell’s telomeres increased while in space. Typically, they decrease as a person ages. Once on Earth, they began to shorten again.

Telomerase, an enzyme that repairs telomeres, increased in both brothers in November, which could be related to a stressful family event at that time.

 

Cognitive Performance in Spaceflight
Mathias Basner is studying Cognitive Performance in Spaceflight, especially the difference in cognition between a 12-month mission and a six-month mission. Though he found a slight decrease in speed and accuracy after the mission, he found no real difference in cognition between 6 month and 12 month missions.

 

Biochemistry
Scott Smith’s investigation into biochemistry showed a decrease in bone density during the second half of Scott’s mission. Scott also had increased levels of a biochemical marker for inflammation once he returned to Earth.

 

Microbiome in the Gastro-Intestinal Tract
Fred Turek reported preliminary results of his investigation into the bacteria in the GI (microbiome) tract that help digestion. There were many differences in the twins’ biomes, but that was expected because of their different diets and environments. There were interesting differences in Scott’s biome between his time in space and his time on the ground. The ratio between two dominant bacterial groups shifted during his flight time compared to his ground time.

 

Immunome Studies
Emmanuel Mignot investigated changes in the bodies of both twins before and after a flu vaccine was given. Both twins showed increased levels of T-cell receptors after the vaccine, which was the expected immune response.

 

Genome Sequencing
Chris Mason is performing Genome Sequencing on the DNA and RNA contained within the twins’ white blood cells with his investigation. RNA sequencing showed that over 200,000 RNA molecules were expressed differently between the twins. Mason will look closer to see if a “space gene” could have been activated while Scott was in space.

 

Epigenomics
Andy Feinberg studies how the environment regulates our gene expression, which is known as epigenomics. Scott’s white blood cell DNA showed decreased levels of chemical modification while in flight, and a return to normal once back on Earth. The same level in Mark (the ground twin) increased midway through the study, but then returned to normal. There was variability between the twins, called epigenetic noise. This noise was higher in Scott during his spaceflight, and returned to baseline levels once back on Earth. This could indicate that some genes are more sensitive to the changing environment of spaceflight than others.

 

There’s a lot more research required to truly understand these results. Once they’re looked at in coordination with other physiological, psychological, and technological investigations, the picture will become clearer. Later in 2017, there will be a joint publication of further results, as well as individual research papers.

 

NASA’s goal is to make space travel safer for astronauts, and to make missions more effective and efficient. With all the talk of missions to Mars in the next decade, these results are arriving at the perfect time.

http://www.universetoday.com/133168/preleminary-results-nasa-twins-study-released/

 

How Stressful Will a Trip to Mars Be on the Human Body?

http://spaceref.com/space-medicine/how-stressful-will-a-trip-to-mars-be-on-the-human-body.html

 

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Volcán de Fuego, Guatemala January 25, 2017

 

volcan-de-fuego-20170125-web.jpg

Volcán de Fuego—an active stratovolcano of Central America—issues an ashy plume that looms over the surrounding towns Yepocapa (left) and Alotenango (right).   Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/volcan-de-fuego-20170125/

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 2 February 2017 - Orbital ATK Resupply Mission Set for March 19

 

Quote

NASA, Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) are now targeting launch of Orbital ATK's seventh commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station on March 19 during a 30-minute window that opens at approximately 10:56 p.m. EDT.

 

This date takes into account space station operations, payload processing, and range availability. Orbital ATK has contracted with ULA for an Atlas V rocket for the mission, which will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

 

NASA has opened media accreditation for the launch. All media accreditation requests should be submitted online.

 

Quote

Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) Adapter Transfer: Ground Controllers maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) and extracted the Small Fine Arm (SFA) from the SFA Storage Equipment (SSE). Overnight tonight the ground controllers will maneuver the SFA to grasp the EFU Adapter from the EFU-5 location. Once the EFU Adapter has been removed, it will be transferred and installed on the JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table. These activity is part of a series of events prior to the deployment of the High Definition Television Camera -Exposed Facility 2 (HDTV-EF2) experiment. HDTV-EF2 is a high-definition television camera system, which is used for earth observation from the ISS.

 

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Modal Test: The crew ingressed BEAM and temporarily installed the Internal Wireless Instrumentation System (IWIS) Remote Sensing Unit (RSU) in Node 3 and the Triaxial Accelerometer (TAA) in BEAM. Following the instrument installation, the crew performed a modal test by imparting loads onto BEAM and measuring the acceleration throughout the module. Expandable habitats, occasionally described as inflatable habitats, greatly decrease the amount of transport volume for future space missions. These "expandables" weigh less and take up less room on a rocket while allowing additional space for living and working. They also provide protection from solar and cosmic radiation, space debris, and other contaminants. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations could potentially use them as habitable structures. BEAM is an experimental expandable capsule attached to the Node 3 aft Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) port. The BEAM investigation will run approximately 2 years. BEAM is not an occupied module, and not used for stowage. During this time, BEAM is constantly monitored for temperature, pressure, and radiation. Periodically, four times per year, the ISS crew enters the module to collect data and check on its structural condition. Following the BEAM investigation, the module will be released from the ISS and burn up on reentry into the atmosphere.

 

SkinSuit: The SkinSuit subject configured the height measurement location, then with operator assistance conducted a height measurement and answered a questionnaire. At the end of the day, the operator took additional measurements prior to the subject doffing the suit. The Skinsuit is a tailor-made overall with a bi-directional weave specially designed to counteract the lack of gravity by squeezing the body from the shoulders, to the feet, with a similar force to that felt on Earth. The subjects of the investigation perform an evaluation of the efficacy of Skinsuit in reducing/preventing low back pain and preventing spine elongation; measure the gravitational load provided by Skinsuit on the ISS crewmember; evaluate operational considerations, in particular hygiene/microbiology, comfort, thermoregulation, donning/doffing, impingement and range of motion to prepare for Long Duration Missions; and evaluate the effect of wearing Skinsuit while exercising.

Electromagnetic Levitation (EML) Sample Coupling Electronic (SCE) Installation: The crew performed an installation of the SCE into the Experiment Module (EXM) of the EML. The SCE will measure electrical resistivity of samples inside the EML. After demating cables and hoses the EXM will be partially removed from the European Drawer Rack (EDR) to allow for the SCE installation. The EXM will be reinstalled and cables and hoses reconnected. EML is a facility composed of 4 inserts installed into EDR on-orbit representing a facility for Electromagnetic Levitation of samples. The experiment samples are installed in a dedicated Sample Chamber that is attached to EML and will be replaced by new Sample Chambers for new experiment batches.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
JEMRMS Operations

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 02/03: SPHERES HALO, ELF Sample Holder Exchange, EFU Adapter Transfer
Saturday, 02/04: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty
Sunday, 02/05: Crew Off Duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - Off
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Operate
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

SpaceRef.com source

 

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NASA ISS Weekly Space to Ground Report - 3 February 2017

 

Quote

NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-iss-weekly-space-to-ground-report---3-february-2017.html

 

Space to Ground: Science Touchdown!: 02/03/2017

video is 2:39 min.

 

 

 

----------------------------

 

BEAM Opens for Tests, Crew Checks Body Shape

 

blog_iss050e037906.jpg

Astronauts Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet are pictured inside BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module. Pesquet is also wearing the experimental SkinSuit.

 

Quote

BEAM was opened for a short time Thursday so the crew could install sensors inside the expandable module. The Expedition 50 space residents also explored how the body changes shape and how to prevent back pain during long-term missions.

 

BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, had its hatches opened temporarily so astronaut Peggy Whitson could install temporary sensors and perform a modal test, which has the astronaut use their fist to impart loads on the module. The sensors are measuring the resulting vibrations and how the module holds up to impacts. BEAM is an expandable habitat technology demonstration, which is a lower-mass and lower-volume system than metal habitats and can increase the efficiency of cargo shipments, possibly reducing the number of launches needed and overall mission costs.

 

Whitson also joined Commander Shane Kimbrough for body measurements to help NASA understand how living in space changes an astronaut’s physical characteristics. The duo collected video and imagery and measured chest, waist, hip arms and legs to help researchers learn how physical changes impact suit sizing.

 

An experimental suit called the SkinSuit is being studied for its ability to offset the effects of microgravity and prevent lower back pain and the stretching of the spine. Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet wore the SkinSuit today and documented his comfort, range of motion and other aspects of the suit.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/02/beam-opens-for-tests-crew-checks-body-shape/

 

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Launch Schedule

 

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NET Feb. 14   Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 10
Launch time: 1634 GMT (11:34 a.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 12th Dragon spacecraft on the 10th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Feb. 13, June 10 and Aug. 1. Moved up from Nov. 21. Delayed from Nov. 11, Jan. 22 and Feb. 8. Moved up from Feb. 15. [Jan. 30]

 

February 22   Soyuz • Progress 66P
Launch time: 0558:33 GMT (12:58:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 66th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 1, Feb. 2 and Feb. 21. [Feb. 3]

http://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

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NASA Highlights Science Launching on Next SpaceX Cargo Mission

 

Quote

NASA will host a media teleconference at 3 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 8, to discuss research investigations launching aboard the next SpaceX commercial resupply flight to the International Space Station. Among the investigations are experiments with potential to fight human disease and a new autonomous spacecraft docking technology for testing.

 

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is targeted to launch no earlier than mid-February, on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first mission from the historic launch pad since SpaceX began to modernize the pad’s structures in preparation to fly astronauts on NASA missions for the agency’s Commercial Crew Program.

 

To participate in the science preview teleconference, reporters must contact Tabatha Thompson at 202-358-1100 or tabatha.t.thompson@nasa.gov by 1 p.m. Wednesday for dial-in information. 

more at the link...

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-highlights-science-launching-on-next-spacex-cargo-mission

 

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Astronauts Study New SkinSuit and New Lights

 

blog_iss049e024763.jpg

The aurora is pictured as the International Space Station orbits Earth during a nighttime pass.

 

Quote

NASA is planning human spaceflight missions further out into space and is learning how astronauts adapt to life off Earth for months and years at a time. The International Space Station provides the laboratory environment for numerous studies into how the human body reacts when exposed to microgravity.

 

Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet, from the European Space Agency, is wearing the new SkinSuit to study its ability to offset the effects of living in space including back pain and spine-stretching. The unique, tailor-made suit squeezes the body from the shoulder to the feet mimicking the force felt on Earth. Pesquet is evaluating the SkinSuit’s comfort, range of motion and its functionality while exercising.

 

Lighting is also very important when living in space since the daily sunrise and sunset cycle that guides life on Earth no longer applies. The crew is participating in tests helping researchers understand how new station lights that can be adjusted for intensity and wavelength are affecting crew sleep patterns and cognitive performance.

 

The cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskiy, Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov, were conducting their own set of human research experiments today. The trio collected blood and saliva samples to explore how the immune system and bone mass is affected in outer space. The samples were stowed in a U.S. science freezer for later analysis on Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/03/astronauts-study-new-skinsuit-and-new-lights/

 

reference...

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2081.html

 

Thomas_Skinsuit_modified.jpg

image link

 

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# PrivetMKS : this week the path the ISS will pass over most of Russia. Station flight Charts -the https: // vk.cc/6bg8yk .

 

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Lake Powell and Grand Staircase-Escalante Viewed From Orbit

 

ooiss048e073279.jpg

Lake Powell and Grand Staircase-Escalante   ©NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/GERALD EICHSTÄD

 

Quote

This panorama, photographed by an astronaut aboard the International Space Station, shows nearly the full length of Lake Powell, the reservoir on the Colorado River in southern Utah and northern Arizona.

 

Note that the ISS was north of the lake at the time, so in this view south is at the top left of the image.

 

At full capacity, the reservoir impounds 24,322,000 acre-feet of water, a vast amount that is used to generate and supply water to several western United States, while also aiding in flood control for the region. It is the second largest reservoir by maximum water capacity in the United States (behind Lake Mead).

 

Landscape elevation changes are hard to see from space, but astronauts learn to interpret high and low places by their color. Green forests indicate two high places in the image that are cooler and receive more rain than the dry, low country surrounding the lake. The isolated Navajo Mountain is a sacred mountain of the Native American Navajo tribe and rises to 3,154 meters (10,348 feet). The long, narrow Kaiparowits Plateau rises nearly 1200 meters (4,000 feet) from Lake Powell to an elevation of more than 2300 meters (7,550 feet). More than 80 kilometers (50 miles) long, the plateau gives a sense of horizontal scale.

 

The region draws nearly 2 million people every year, even though it is remote and has few roads. Most of the area in view is protected as part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument--the largest amount of protected land in a U.S. national monument.

Astronaut photograph ISS048-E-73279 was acquired on September 6, 2016, with a Nikon D4 digital camera using an 800 millimeter lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by a member of the Expedition 48 crew. The image has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed.

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/lake-powell-and-grand-staircase-escalante-viewed-from-orbit.html

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 3 February 2017

 

Quote

NASA is planning human spaceflight missions further out into space and is learning how astronauts adapt to life off Earth for months and years at a time. The International Space Station provides the laboratory environment for numerous studies into how the human body reacts when exposed to microgravity.

 

Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet, from the European Space Agency, is wearing the new SkinSuit to study its ability to offset the effects of living in space including back pain and spine-stretching. The unique, tailor-made suit squeezes the body from the shoulder to the feet mimicking the force felt on Earth. Pesquet is evaluating the SkinSuit's comfort, range of motion and its functionality while exercising.

 

Lighting is also very important when living in space since the daily sunrise and sunset cycle that guides life on Earth no longer applies. The crew is participating in tests helping researchers understand how new station lights that can be adjusted for intensity and wavelength are affecting crew sleep patterns and cognitive performance.

 

The cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskiy, Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov, were conducting their own set of human research experiments today. The trio collected blood and saliva samples to explore how the immune system and bone mass is affected in outer space. The samples were stowed in a U.S. science freezer for later analysis on Earth.

 

Quote

Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) Adapter Transfer: Overnight ground controllers maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Robotic Manipulator System (RMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA) to a position to remove the EFU Adapter from the EFU-5 location. Once the EFU Adapter was removed, it was transferred and installed onto the JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table. The slide table, with the EFU adapter, was then retracted back into the JEMAL. These activities are part of a series of tasks required to deploy the High Definition Television Camera - Exposed Facility 2 (HDTV-EF2) experiment next week. HDTV-EF2 is a high-definition television camera system, which will be used for earth observation from the ISS.

 

SkinSuit: The crew performed Day 2 of the first session of SkinSuit taking measurements at donning in the morning and again in the afternoon at doffing. The Skinsuit is a tailor-made overall with a bi-directional weave specially designed to counteract the lack of gravity by squeezing the body from the shoulders, to the feet, with a similar force to that felt on Earth. The subjects of the investigation perform an evaluation of the efficacy of Skinsuit in reducing/preventing low back pain and preventing spine elongation; measure the gravitational load provided by Skinsuit on the ISS crewmember; evaluate operational considerations, in particular hygiene/microbiology, comfort, thermoregulation, donning/doffing, impingement and range of motion to prepare for Long Duration Missions; and evaluate the effect of wearing Skinsuit while exercising.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
JEMRMS Ops
SPHERES Halo support
PCS Reboot and File Download

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Saturday, 02/04: Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty, HRF Collections
Sunday, 02/05: Crew Off Duty, HRF Collections
Monday, 02/06: (Crew Light Duty payback from EVA) Dragon OBT, Lighting Effects, ExPress Locker Config

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-3-february-2017--.html

 

----------------------------

 

Japanese cargo ship ends mission after space debris experiment flounders

 

kite_art.png

Artist’s concept of how the tether for Japan’s KITE experiment would have appeared when deployed from the HTV supply ship. Credit: JAXA

 

Quote

Japan’s HTV supply ship fell to Earth on Sunday more than a week after leaving the International Space Station, burning up in the atmosphere after officials gave up on an experiment looking into ways to remove space junk from orbit.

 

The barrel-shaped spacecraft, measuring 30 feet (9.2 meters) long and 14 feet (4.4 meters) wide, departed the space station Jan. 27 after delivering more than 9,000 pounds (about 4.1 metric tons) of supplies, experiments and six lithium-ion batteries to begin a refresh of the research lab’s electrical system.

 

The mission launched from Japan on Dec. 9 aboard an H-2B rocket.

 

Astronauts replaced the cargo with trash inside the HTV’s pressurized cabin, and the station’s robotics system placed nine no-longer-needed batteries into the logistics craft’s external cargo bay before the departure.

 

The mission was Japan’s sixth HTV resupply mission — nicknamed Kounotori 6, using the Japanese word for “white stork.”

 

Shortly after leaving the space station, the HTV was supposed to release an electrodynamic tether measuring nearly a half-mile (700 meters) long for a research experiment to gauge such a device’s effectiveness at helping clear low Earth orbit of space junk.

 

But the experiment encountered problems, Japanese scientists said, and the tether was never unreeled.

 

One of four bolts holding the end mass — a structure fixed to the end of the tether — to the HTV’s main body apparently did not release as planned Jan. 28, according to a statement by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

 

JAXA said telemetry data from the spacecraft indicated one of the bolts did not disengage after an initial release command, but data showed the bolt disconnected a few minutes later after further commands.

 

A couple of hours later, an attempt to extend the tether did not work. JAXA said ground controllers tried to unfurl it multiple times without success.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/06/japanese-cargo-ship-ends-mission-after-space-debris-experiment-flounders/

 

----------------------------------

 

White Stork Burns over Pacific and Crew Preps for Dragon

 

blog_iss050e036142.jpg

Japan’s HTV-6 resupply ship begins its separation after it’s release from the International Space Station.

 

Quote

Japan’s Kounotori, or “White Stork,” HTV-6 resupply ship completed its mission Sunday morning just over a week after its release from the International Space Station. The HTV-6 fired its engines for the last time sending it into Earth’s atmosphere for a fiery demise over the southern Pacific Ocean.

 

The Expedition 50 crew is now planning for the arrival of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft later in February. The astronauts, including Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet, talked to ground specialists Monday. The trio then began reviewing the mission profile, training materials and rendezvous procedures.

 

Kimbrough started his day working on life support systems maintenance before activating a combustion experiment laptop computer at the end of his shift. Pesquet wrapped up his day in the Japanese Kibo lab module preparing the airlock for the external installation of a high-definition video camera for Earth observations. Whitson began preparing communications and science gear ahead of the SpaceX CRS-10 resupply mission.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/06/white-stork-burns-over-pacific-and-crew-preps-for-dragon/

 

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A new recruit for ESA's astronaut corps

 

Quote

Matthias Maurer, from Germany, has started his astronaut training as part of ESA's astronaut corps. Matthias was among the 10 finalists in 2009 selection, and is now undergoing basic training at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany.

 

ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet is on the International Space Station and all the original class of 2009 have now flown in space. Matthias Maurer's nomination reflects the agency's success in the Station programme bringing new flight opportunities in the near future.

 

After the 2009 selection process, Matthias was hired for ESA as a crew support engineer and obtained extensive training and experience in human spaceflight operations, giving him a first taste of the job. As a Eurocom spacecraft communicator, he supported his colleagues in space.

 

Matthias experienced weightlessness during parabolic flights while assisting in the training of colleague Samantha Cristoforetti and he took part in ESA's CAVES underground training. In the summer of 2016 he took part in a NASA programme that sends astronauts, engineers and scientists to live and work underwater in the Aquarius research station as a stand-in for spaceflight.

more at the link...

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A_new_recruit_for_ESAs_astronaut_corps_999.html

 

--------------------------------

 

NanoRacks and Boeing Building First Commercial Airlock on ISS

 

ooISS_NanoAL-1.4k2_NR.jpg

NanoRacks airlock   NanoRacks

 

Quote

NanoRacks, LLC will partner with Boeing on the building and installation of the first commercial airlock module, which will attach to the U.S. segment on the International Space Station (ISS).


In May 2016, NanoRacks and NASA signed a Space Act Agreement in order to install a private airlock module onboard the International Space Station - the first in station history. The NanoRacks Airlock Module will be both a permanent commercial uncrewed module onboard International Space Station, and also a module capable of being removed from the space station and used on a future commercial platform.

 

NanoRacks has selected Boeing to fabricate and install the Airlock's Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM), which is used to connect most pressurized modules of the ISS - and is the most critical piece of hardware for the airlock. The PCBM hardware is being manufactured at the Boeing facilities in Huntsville, Alabama. Boeing will also provide additional engineering services required for developing and manufacturing of the airlock.

 

"This partnership is an important step in the commercial transition we'll see on the ISS in coming years," said Mark Mulqueen Boeing ISS program manager. "Utilizing a commercial airlock to keep up with the demand of deployment will significantly streamline our process."

 

ooISS_NanoAL.4k3_NR.jpg

NanoRacks

 

Quote

Commercial opportunities through Airlock begin with cubesat and small satellite deployment from station and include a full range of additional services to meet customer needs from NASA and the growing commercial sector. Currently, cubesats and small satellites are deployed through the government-operated Japanese Kibo Airlock. Additionally, the crew on board may now assemble payloads typically flown in soft-stowage ISS Cargo Transfer Bags into larger items that currently cannot be handled by the existing Kibo Airlock.

 

"We are very pleased to have Boeing joining with us to develop the Airlock Module," says NanoRacks CEO Jeffrey Manber. "This is a huge step for NASA and the U.S. space program, to leverage the commercial marketplace for low-Earth orbit, on Space Station and beyond, and NanoRacks is proud to be taking the lead in this prestigious venture."

 

Beyond station, the Airlock could at some future time, be detached and placed onto another on-orbit platform.

 

ooISS_NanoAL.4k1_NR.jpg

 

Quote

The in-house team at NanoRacks, led by Mr. Brock Howe, will oversee the project management, mechanical and avionics design engineering, safety, operations, quality assurance, mockups and crew training, and the final assembly, integration and testing of the Airlock. Additionally, NanoRacks will be manifesting the Airlock for launch, with an estimated launch in 2019.

 

"The NanoRacks Airlock Module is the next logical step in the successful line of NanoRacks' commercial payload facilities," says Brock Howe,

 

NanoRacks' Head of Airlock. "This Airlock Module will provide a broad range of capabilities to our payload customers and expand greatly on the commercial utilization of the Station - and I look forward to leading the team at NanoRacks on this next venture."
 

http://spaceref.biz/company/nanoracks-and-boeing-building-first-commercial-airlock-on-iss.html

 

The International Space Station will get a new, private airlock in 2019

 

Quote

Adding an airlock to the Tranquility module, which already has Bigelow’s expandable module attached to it, would give NASA a bonafide commercial presence on the station. While astronauts test the human-rated Bigelow habitation module, they’ll also be working with a commercial airlock that could one day be transferred to a private station. Meanwhile, private spacecraft developed by SpaceX, Orbital ATK, Boeing, and eventually Sierra Nevada will deliver supplies and crew. (The airlock would be carried to the station aboard a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft.)

more at the link...

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02/the-international-space-station-will-get-a-new-private-airlock-in-2019/

 

The International Space Station is getting its first commercial airlock, planned for 2019

https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/06/the-international-space-station-is-getting-its-first-commercial-airlock-planned-for-2019/

 

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Challenger's Soccer Ball Finally Reaches Space

 

oosoccer.jpg

Shane Kimbrough ‏@astro_kimbrough This ball was on Challenger that fateful day. Flown by Ellison Onizuka for his daughter, a soccer player @Clear_LakeHS. #NASARemembers   NASA

 

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/challengers-soccer-ball-finally-reaches-space.html

 

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Uluru - Ayer's Rock - Seen From Orbit

 

oo31793121233.jpg

Uluru - Ayer's Rock   ESA/NASA

 

Quote

Thomas Pesquet: Here is a picture I've wanted to take for a long time: Ayer's rock in Australia (also named Uluru in aboriginal). This is a sacred site, and a striking landscape. Not easy to spot from ISS, but as the sun went down, we got lucky!

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/uluru---ayers-rock---seen-from-orbit.html

 

-------------------------

 

 

 

Quote

RSC "Energia" plans to launch small satellites Cubesat via cargo ships # ProgressMS -http: // www. roscosmos.ru/23205/ .

 

RSC "Energia". Project on launch of small satellites on cargo ships

 

Quote

02.06.2017 13:07
Rocket and Space Corporation (RSC) "Energy" (part of the Roscosmos) plans to involve the Russian leading research centers and universities in the launch of small satellites Cubesat project with cargo vehicle (THC) «Progress MS."
 
The project involves the installation on the outside of the ship's cargo of special containers for the removal of small satellites into the target orbit. It may be commercial, educational, or applied satellites dimension to 6U. Cargo ships "Progress MS" run on a regular basis three times a year in the transport and logistics of the International Space Station (ISS).
 
The work is conducted within the framework of the commercialization of the ISS Russian Segment. The program can participate as foreign customers on a commercial basis.
 
The height of the breeding satellite orbit - 260-410 km, the inclination - 51.6 degrees. In the autonomous flight of the ship's orbit can be raised to 500 km.
 
A group of specialists of RSC "Energia", the young company's employees - members of the Innovative Youth Projects Committee (KIPM), has already started to create the necessary infrastructure for the launch, which was discussed in November 2016 during the session on "Optimizing the work on the preparation of space experiments to launch small satellites "in the development of the production system of the State Corporation" Roskosmos "

http://www.roscosmos.ru/23205/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-------------------------------

 

Fun Stuff...

 

 

 

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 6 February 2017 - Japan's White Stork Burns Up

 

Quote

Japan's Kounotori, or "White Stork," HTV-6 resupply ship completed its mission Sunday morning just over a week after its release from the International Space Station. The HTV-6 fired its engines for the last time sending it into Earth's atmosphere for a fiery demise over the southern Pacific Ocean.

 

The Expedition 50 crew is now planning for the arrival of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft later in February. The astronauts, including Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet, talked to ground specialists Monday. The trio then began reviewing the mission profile, training materials and rendezvous procedures.

 

Kimbrough started his day working on life support systems maintenance before activating a combustion experiment laptop computer at the end of his shift. Pesquet wrapped up his day in the Japanese Kibo lab module preparing the airlock for the external installation of a high-definition video camera for Earth observations. Whitson began preparing communications and science gear ahead of the SpaceX CRS-10 resupply mission.

 

Quote

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-6 Deorbit: HTV-6 successfully completed all three deorbit burns over the weekend. Loss of telemetry occurred Sunday 05-February at 15:11:21 GMT at an altitude of 80 km over the South Pacific near 50° S, 142° W.

 

Lighting Effects Vision Test: This morning the crew unstowed the Visual Performance Test hardware, then configured the Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) in their Crew Quarters (CQ) to the correct mode, turning off all other light sources, then performed one Numerical Verification Test and one Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

 

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Repress: The crew repressed and conducted a leak check of the JEMAL with the Exposed Facility Unit-5 (EFU5) adapter on the slide table. Tomorrow the crew will install the HDTV EF-2. HDTV-EF2 is a high-definition television camera system delivered by HTV-6, which will be used for earth observation from the ISS.

 

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): The crew participated in a conference with Ground Specialists in preparation of the start of robotics OBT for the upcoming Dragon rendezvous and capture. Following this conference, they reviewed the OBT materials and then performed computer based proficiency training on the Dragon mission profile, the Dragon rendezvous crew procedures and the crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
3A1 Battery Capacity Test
MCA Zero Calibration

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 02/07: HDTV Install JEMAL, Vascular Echo, Fast Neuron Spectrometer Relocate, A/L MTL Config, EVA Battery Charger Checkout, CUCU S/W Update
Wednesday, 02/08: 49S EMER Drill OBT, Dragon OBT, Lighting Effects, Galley Food Warmer Relocate, Neuromapping
Thursday, 02/09: SPHERES Docking Port Run, Skinsuit Measurements, Galley MERLIN transfer, Story Time - Buoy Demo, EVA Safer Checkout, CIR

Bottle Replace

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-6-february-2017---japans-white-stork-burns-up.html

 

TPK "MS-05 the Union." Works in the MIK.

video is 3:47 min.

 

 

 

Quote

Published on Feb 6, 2017
At Baikonur launch site, work began to prepare for the launch of manned spacecraft "Soyuz-05 MS", which is scheduled for launch in the summer of 2017. TPK crew commander Sergei Ryazan (Roscosmos), flight engineers Randolph Breznik (NASA), Paolo Nespoli (ESA).

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 7 February 2017 - New HD Camera to be Installed

 

jem-ef-and-kibo-photo.jpg

NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 7 February 2017 - New HD Camera to be Installed.   NASA

 

Quote

A new high-definition Earth observation video camera will be installed on the outside of Japan's Kibo lab module later this week. The Expedition 50 crew is also getting the International Space Station ready for the next SpaceX Dragon resupply ship.

 

An HDTV camera delivered aboard Japan's HTV-6 cargo craft in December is being readied for its deployment outside Kibo. The video camera will be staged inside the Kibo airlock today before depressurization and leak checks begin. The HDTV camera will then be robotically installed on a platform outside Kibo called the Exposed Facility where it will be used for Earth observations.

 

The astronauts are also getting communications gear ready to assist with the rendezvous and approach of the tenth SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply mission. Dragon is planned to launch later this month from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

 

NASA is hosting a media teleconference Wednesday at 3 p.m. EST highlighting new experiments being delivered aboard Dragon. The advanced space research will include studies to fight a wide range of diseases, observe Earth's climate and test autonomous rendezvous capabilities.

 

Quote

Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU) Software Update: Today, the crew updated the spare CUCU software to the latest version. This required the crew to demate cables from the prime CUCU and transfer them to the spare. Once connected, the spare CUCU was updated to the latest software version. The cables were transferred back to the prime CUCU, and the system was put back into a nominal configuration.

 

Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Switchover: Today the crew reconfigured the Airlock MTL plumbing from being connected to the Lab ITCS to Node 3 ITCS prior to Node 1 Galley Rack activation. If cooling to the upcoming Node 1 Galley rack was activated while the Airlock is still plumbed to the Lab, inadequate cooling may be available for payloads being performed in the Lab. Therefore, the Airlock MTL reconfiguration to Node 3 was performed prior to the activation of Node 1 Galley Rack, which is planned later this week. During Galley Rack MTL jumper installation, the keying positions of jumper Quick Disconnects (QDs) did not fit the expected connection QDs. The mismatch in keying prevents the mating of the QDs. Crew has stood down from activity and left the ITCS QDs demated until a forward plan can be discussed.

 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Valve Troubleshooting: Lab CDRA Air Selector Valve (ASV) Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) LAD62B-A Remote Power Controller (RPC) 12 has been experiencing seemingly random overcurrent trips since March 2014. On January 31, 2017 the crew installed a new troubleshooting cable that connected to RPC 5 and moved three of the valves to be powered through that cable, with a final configuration of 3 valves on RPC 12 and 3 on RPC 5. On February 6, the Lab CDRA RPCM LAD62B-A RPC 05 tripped indicating that one of the valves on that cable is suspect. Today the crew swapped the cable connection on ASV101 to RPC 12 to continue troubleshooting. RPC 5 then tripped again. Crew then moved ASV103 to RPC 12 to further isolate the trip and RPC 5 tripped again indicating ASV102 as the likely cause of the trips. Ground teams will meet to discuss further troubleshooting before making any hardware changes.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
JEMAL Operations
MSS Powerup and SPDM Diagnostics

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 02/08: 49S Emergency Drill OBT, Dragon OBT, Lighting Effects, Galley Food Warmer Relocate, Neuromapping
Thursday, 02/09: SPHERES Docking Port Run, Skinsuit Measurements, Galley MERLIN transfer, Story Time - Buoy Demo, EVA Safer Checkout, CIR Bottle Replace
Friday, 02/10: JEM Accumulator Package R&R, PMA2 Ingress, RELL and JOTI Install on JEMAL Slide Table, FIR Rack Light Replacement

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-7-february-2017---new-hd-camera-to-be-installed.html

 

Sloshing in space

Video is 0:41 min.

 

 

 

Quote

Published on Feb 7, 2017
ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet working in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station to verify how fluids behave in weightlessness.

Researchers can model and predict how water behaves on Earth, but without gravity things become even more complicated. The SPHERES-Slosh experiment has been using the Station’s volleyball-sized autonomous robots to observe how fluids move and behave inside containers. The experiment revealed some surprising results and researchers asked Thomas Pesquet to verify some of the observations in person so they could analyse the sloshing via video.

Thomas wrote: “Science is fun! Astronauts have a number of "voluntary science" experiments that we can perform outside of our normal working hours. Here I recorded some video of water in these tanks as it moves about inside, the technical term is sloshing. How fluids behave is hard to model in computers and predict how it will behave, let alone in space. But we need this information to build better spacecraft tanks to use every last drop and increase their working life.”

Thomas is spending six months on the International Space Station as part of his Proxima mission. During Proxima, Thomas will perform around 50 scientific experiments for ESA and France’s space agency CNES as well as take part in many research activities for the other Station partners. The mission is part of ESA’s vision to use Earth-orbiting spacecraft as a place to live and work for the benefit of European society while using the experience to prepare for future voyages of exploration further into the Solar System.

 

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Station Prepped for Science Gear from Japan and SpaceX

 

blog_iss050e38346.jpg

The space station’s solar arrays and the Earth’s limb were pictured Feb. 2, 2017,as the Expedition 50 crew orbited over the southern Pacific Ocean. Credit: Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth

 

Quote

A new high-definition Earth observation video camera will be installed on the outside of Japan’s Kibo lab module later this week. The Expedition 50 crew is also getting the International Space Station ready for the next SpaceX Dragon resupply ship.

 

An HDTV camera delivered aboard Japan’s HTV-6 cargo craft in December is being readied for its deployment outside Kibo. The video camera will be staged inside the Kibo airlock today before depressurization and leak checks begin. The HDTV camera will then be robotically installed on a platform outside Kibo called the Exposed Facility where it will be used for Earth observations.

 

The astronauts are also getting communications gear ready to assist with the rendezvous and approach of the tenth SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply mission. Dragon is planned to launch later this month from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/07/station-prepped-for-science-gear-from-japan-and-spacex/

 

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Dragon Training and Brain Imaging for Astronauts

 

blog_iss050e039214.jpg

Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, from the European Space Agency, works to load gear inside the Kibo laboratory module’s airlock.

 

Quote

The Expedition 50 crew trained today for the robotic capture of the SpaceX Dragon and studied how the brain adapts to living in space. Three crew members also conducted an emergency drill aboard the International Space Station.

 

Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet joined Commander Shane Kimbrough to study the robotics maneuvers they will use when the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship arrives later this month. Dragon is targeted to liftoff mid-February atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center. The tenth commercial resupply mission from SpaceX will deliver advanced space research to improve disease-fighting drugs, observe Earth’s climate and automate spacecraft navigation.

 

Whitson also set up magnetic resonance brain imaging hardware for the NeuroMapping experiment. The study, which has been ongoing since 2014, is exploring changes in the brain and how an astronaut’s cognition, perception and motion are affected by long-term space missions.

 

Veteran station residents Oleg Novitskiy and Whitson along with first-time space flyer Pesquet practiced an emergency Soyuz descent today. The trio entered their Soyuz MS-03 spacecraft and simulated a scenario in the unlikely event the crew would have to evacuate the station quickly and return to Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/08/dragon-training-and-brain-imaging-for-astronauts/

 

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NASA Outlines Science Heading to Space Station Aboard CRS-10 Dragon

 

crs9dock.jpg

CRS-10 will be the 10th dedicated Dragon to launch to the International Space Station (ISS). Photo Credit: NASA

 

Quote

NASA personnel, together with investigators and student scientists, gathered for a media teleconference earlier today (Wednesday, 8 February), to discuss the research payloads heading uphill aboard SpaceX’s next Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) Dragon mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Launch of the CRS-10 mission—the tenth dedicated Dragon cargo flight since October 2012—is currently targeted to fly no earlier than Saturday, 18 February, atop SpaceX’s Upgraded Falcon 9 booster, embarking on a month-long voyage to the orbiting outpost. All told, CRS-10 will transport 5,500 pounds (2,500 kg) of hardware and supplies uphill and will return approximately 5,000 pounds (2,270 kg) back to Earth. Significantly, it will become the first mission to launch from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida since the end of the Space Shuttle era in July 2011.

 

Against this historic backdrop, SpaceX is gearing up for an ambitious return to ISS cargo delivery operations. Loaded aboard Dragon’s pressurized module for CRS-10 will be equipment and supplies for the station’s incumbent Expedition 50 increment of Commander Shane Kimbrough and his crewmates Sergei Ryzhikov, Andrei Borisenko and Oleg Novitsky of Russia, veteran NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson and Frenchman Thomas Pesquet.

A pair of 17-year-old students from Craft Academy at Morehead State University in Moorhead, Ky., opened today’s briefing by outlining an experiment to use and evaluate smooth muscle cells to test theories about muscle contraction in the microgravity environment. Danielle Gibson and Will Castro noted the “significant physiological differences” observed upon muscle behavior in space and that their research carries major implications for treatment of blood pressure conditions.

very indepth analysis at the link...

http://www.americaspace.com/?p=98064

 

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Underwater Volcanic Eruption Near Tongatapu Seen From Space

 

oohungatonga_oli.jpg

volcano near Tongatapu   NASA

 

Quote

Murray Ford was scanning satellite imagery of a young island in Tonga called Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai when he noticed something odd--a turquoise plume of water--in the corner of an image. 


The coastal geologist from the University of Auckland had stumbled across an underwater volcano in the midst of an eruption.

 

That plume is coming from a seamount located 33 kilometers (20 miles) from Tonga's main island of Tongatapu. The images above were captured on January 27, 2017, by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8. The discolored water was likely caused by the underwater release of gases, rocks, and volcanic fluids. The eruption also may have disturbed sediment on the seamount. Other images collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NASA and NOAA satellites suggest that the eruption began on January 23, 2017.

 

"It may continue for some days or weeks, and an island may form temporarily," said Martin Jutzeler, a University of Tasmania geologist who studies underwater eruptions. "However, new volcanic islands are easily eroded by wave action."

 

Underwater eruptions are relatively common in this area, which is part of the Tonga-Kermadec volcanic arc and the Pacific Ring of Fire. This plume appears to have originated from a seamount that geologists call "Submarine Volcano III." It has shown signs of activity in 1911, 1923, 1970, 1990, and 2007.

 

Ash from volcanic eruptions on land are a well-known threat to airplanes, and underwater eruptions can likewise pose a hazard to ships. Some underwater eruptions produce rafts of light, porous rock called pumice that float on the sea surface and can clog ship engines.

http://spaceref.com/earth/underwater-volcanic-eruption-near-tongatapu-seen-from-space.html

 

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:D

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Draggendrop    5,747

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/08/2017

 

Quote

Galley Rack Outfitting: The crew continued with Galley Rack Outfitting today. They mated power, data, and fluid umbilicals to the Galley Rack in preparation for activation. They also relocated the Food Warmer from the Node 1 Starboard location to the Node 1 Galley Rack. Following this relocation the Food Warmer will be powered from the Galley Rack instead of the Ku-Band Power Supply.

 

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) Adapter Transfer to the Exposed Facility (EF):  Overnight ground specialist at SSIPC maneuvered Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) from Small Fine Arm (SFA) Park Position to JEM airlock to grasp EFU Adapter with SFA. Then they unberthed the EFU Adapter from JEM AL slide table, transferred and install it to EFU 5. Finally, the JEMRMS was maneuvered to SFA Park.

>

SpX-10 Preparation:  Today the crew performed their Dragon Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) training session 1.  This training session included material for the crew to perform some Self Study before performing the ROBoT 1 session, which includes a 30m approach, two Capture Point (CP)-hold runs, and 2m runs. 

 

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) Battery Charger Calibration Verification: Today, the crew ran a series of checks to determine if the Li-Ion Battery Charger is operating within calibration standards. This verification is required once every five years. The EMU Li-Ion Battery Charger Calibration Verification Device (LCVD) and multimeter were connected between the Li-Ion Battery Charger and EMU Li-Ion Battery in order to check the calibration of the battery charger. There were no issues, and the calibration was verified.

 

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew completed maintenance on the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) and Test Module seals. During the activity they measured the SAFER regulator pressure under flow and no-flow conditions, performed a leak check and measured the relief valve opening and reseated pressure of the SAFER.

 

Quote

Completed Task List Items

Veggie 03 Pillow Watering
Remove and Replace Waste Hygiene Compartment (WHC) ЕДВ-Y  


Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.

SSRMS LEE Checkout
Battery 3A2 Capacity Test


Three-Day Look Ahead:

Thursday, 02/09: SPHERES Docking Port Run, Skinsuit Measurements, Galley MERLIN transfer, Story Time – Buoy Demo, EVA Safer Checkout, CIR Bottle Replace
Friday, 02/10: JEM Accumulator Package R&R, PMA2 Ingress, RELL and JOTI Install on JEMAL Slide Table, FIR Rack Light Replacement
Saturday, 02/11: Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty

https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/02/08/iss-daily-summary-report-2082017/

 

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Astronauts Evaluate Crew Dragon Controls

 

Quote

Astronauts Bob Behnken, left, and Eric Boe evaluated the controls, seating and other aspects of the crew compartment of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft during a recent visit to the company’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California. Sitting in a mock-up of the Crew Dragon cockpit, the two studied many aspects of the layout including spacing of displays and ease of movement.

 

The testing is taking place as SpaceX develops the Crew Dragon with an eye toward launching the spacecraft into orbit in the near future on a flight test to and from the International Space Station. Later, the Crew Dragons, launching atop Falcon 9 rockets, will perform operational missions to rotate crews aboard the orbiting laboratory. Companies build high fidelity models of their spacecraft and systems to help determine everything from practicality and operation to fit and comfort.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2017/02/09/astronauts-evaluate-crew-dragon-controls/

 

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Next Dragon Launch Set, Crew Tests Tiny Satellites

 

blog_iss050e038054.jpg

Astronaut Shane Kimbrough works with a pair of tiny bowling-ball sized satellites known as SPHERES, or Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites.

 

Quote

SpaceX has announced no earlier than Feb. 18 for the launch of its tenth commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. Dragon will be loaded with advanced space science and will launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet will command the Canadarm2 to capture Dragon when it arrives about two days later. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson will assist the duo and monitor Dragon as it approaches the station for a month-long stay.

 

The crew took a break from SpaceX preparations today and focused on a wide variety of science work. Kimbrough set up a pair of tiny internal satellites known as SPHERES and tested their ability to perform automated docking maneuvers. The tests will assist in the development of computer vision tracking algorithms possibly helping in the recovery of space debris.

 

Pesquet and Whitson worked in the afternoon to swap a gas bottle inside the Combustion Integrated Rack. The rack, located in the U.S. Destiny laboratory module, enables safe research into how fuels and other materials burn in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/09/next-dragon-launch-set-crew-tests-tiny-satellites/

 

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History....Variable Density Tunnel, February 3, 1922

 

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Variable Density Tunnel 
Description The Variable Density Tunnel (VDT) on a rail car at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company where it was built. The Tunnel was shipped by barge to the Langley Memorial Laboratory in June 1922. The VDT was designed by Dr. Max Munk and it leap-frogged wind tunnel technology of the time putting Langley Lab and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) at the forefront of aeronautical research in the 1920s.
 
Center: LARC
Image # : L-1990-04352
Date: February 3, 1922

Variable Density Tunnel

Image link, various sizes available

 

:)

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Unobscured Vision    2,678

Nice @Draggendrop. Too bad there wasn't a video of them testing the Dragon 2 controls in the article page. Can't wait to see it in action. :yes: 

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Draggendrop    5,747

NASA BETS THE FARM ON THE LONG-TERM VIABILITY OF SPACE AGRICULTURE

 

596750main_iotw-spacefarm_full.jpg?itok=

Old MacDonald had a space farm.  NASA/Sean Smith

 

Quote

Bryan Onate, an engineer stationed at the Kennedy Space Center, is on the forefront of this technology. He helped lead the team that built Veggie, NASA’s first plant growth system, and next month he's sending up Veggie’s new and improved brother, the Advanced Plant Habitat.


The habitat is the size of a mini-fridge. But instead of storing soda, it will carefully record every step in the growth of plants aboard the space station. This will allow researchers on the ground unprecedented insight into how plants are shaped by microgravity and other forces at work in outer space. And, Onate says, “astronauts may get to enjoy the fruit of our labor.”


Though it’s small, the new habitat is equipped with over 180 sensors and three cameras. The sensors will record data about temperature, moisture and oxygen in the unit. The cameras—one of which is infrared—will provide further insight into what’s happening in the chamber. All of the data is processed by a computer named, with NASA’s characteristic acronymic humor, “PHARMER”—Plant Habitat Avionics Real-Time Manager in Express Rack. “It’s really, truly a scientific toolbox,” Onate says.


Except for installation, the system should run with very little input and cut down on the astronomical (wink wink) cost of shipping food to the station. Currently, it costs more than $10,000 a pound to send food and other supplies hurtling upwards. That means your typical 14 ounce loaf of bread—just $3.35 here on Earth—would cost somewhere in the ballpark of $8,750 to send to space. Plus, the freshest stuff doesn’t last long. “If I pack a bag of cherry tomatoes…My tomatoes are going to only be good for a week or two maybe,” Onate says. “But if I take seeds with me, I can grow food.”

 

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Advanced Plant Habitat   NASA/Bill White

 

Quote

One of the habitat’s real innovations is its light. The sun emits about 2,000 micromoles to Earth. NASA's new habitat will put out 1,000, or half the light of the sun.


That's a crucial source of luminescence for the plants, which need a glow to grow, but don't receive it on the space station, which, like the rest of space, is always cloaked in darkness. NASA researchers hope to test the red, green, blue and white spectrum lights at different intensities to find out what best stimulates plant growth. “We can really target a light treatment," Onate says, "just so we can start learning the differences.”


Ultimately, the habitat is more of a research project than a bonafide space farm. But Onate sees it as the first step in a larger mission to make human life sustainable off-world. "In the future, on Mars, if we colonize out there, resources are a premium," he says. The key will be finding a way to manage plant growth long-term, in settings we've only just begun to understand.


"These [plant projects] are all the little footsteps we’re taking to understand" how to keep humans in space more permanently, he says. And one day soon, NASA may take the giant leap to self-sustainable space farming.

http://www.popsci.com/nasa-space-agriculture-farm-mars#page-6

 

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Three Spaceships Targeting February and March Launches

 

blog_iss050e034428.jpg

Stars, the aurora and the International Space Station’s solar arrays are seen in this picture taken Jan. 18, 2017.

 

Quote

The Expedition 50 crew is gearing up for three different spaceships in two months to resupply the International Space Station. The crew also worked today on a variety of research hardware and practiced an emergency drill.

 

Two U.S. companies are getting their rockets ready to deliver food, fuel, supplies and new science gear to the crew. SpaceX is first in line with a plan to launch their Dragon spacecraft atop its Falcon 9 rocket no earlier than Feb. 18. Next, Orbital ATK is targeting March 19 to launch their Cygnus spacecraft on its seventh resupply mission to the station. Both spaceships will be captured by the Canadarm2 robotic. The Dragon will be installed to the Harmony module and the Cygnus will be attached to the Unity module.

 

Russia is preparing its Progress 66 (66P) cargo craft for a Feb. 22 launch from Kazakhstan. The 66P will take a two-day trip to the orbital laboratory before automatically docking to the Pirs Docking Compartment.

 

Onboard the station, Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet spent the day in Japan’s Kibo lab module working on science gear maintenance. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson installed a leak locator in Kibo’s airlock that will be used to locate the source of an ammonia leak outside the Japanese lab.

Commander Shane Kimbrough and his Soyuz crewmates cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhikov got together in the afternoon an emergency descent drill. The trio practiced the procedures necessary to evacuate the station quickly in the unlikely event of an emergency and return to Earth inside their Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/10/three-spaceships-targeting-february-and-march-launches/

 

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Elusive blue lightning filmed dancing above a thunderstorm

 

Quote

In Earth’s upper atmosphere, blue jets, red sprites, pixies, halos, trolls and elves streak toward space, rarely caught in the act by human eyes.

 

This mixed-bag of quasi-mythological terms are all names for transient luminous events, or, quite simply, forms of lightning that dance atop thunderstorm clouds. Airplane pilots have reported seeing them, but their elusive nature makes them hard to study. But ESA astronaut Andreas Morgensen, while aboard the International Space Station in September 2015, filmed hundreds of blue jets flashing over a thunderstorm that was pounding the Bay of Bengal, confirming a mysterious atmospheric phenomenon.

 

According to Morgensen and researchers at the Denmark National Space Institute, these observations are the first of their kind, and offer a rare glimpse of poorly understood atmospheric phenomena. His work, which was published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, also proves that the ISS is a perfect lab for studying elves and pixies, and a planned follow-up mission should reveal even more.

 

A Great View

Storm clouds are like electrical cakes with alternating layers of negatively and positively charged ions. Air currents tear through the sky cake, squashing the layers and reversing their stacking order. When the base layer’s charge differs from the earth’s charge—zap. The seems to be true for layers higher in the atmosphere, but instead of striking earth, transient luminous events discharge into space. Of course, you need to be above the clouds to see them; thus, the reason they are difficult to study.

 

stormcloud.jpg

A frame-by-frame of the storm cloud that produced the pulsating blue jet   

 

 

Figure4Thezoooftransientluminouseventsgeneratedbythunderstormsabovethe.png

The various types of transient luminous events   D D Sentman, University of Alaska in Fairbanks

 

Quote

However, scientists need to know much more about these events to formulate any firm conclusions, and they’ll get some help. Later this year, the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) will head to the ISS to continuously monitor thunderstorms—combing the atmosphere for transient luminous events. The ASIM experiment will observe these events in two ultraviolet optical bands, as well as the X- and gamma-rays.

With imagery provided by ASIM, scientists might get a little closer to understanding the physics of these colorful flashes.

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/02/blue-jets-lighting-iss

 

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Cargo ship # ProgressMS05 allowed to fill up. Start is scheduled at 08:58 MSK on 22 February. The ship will deliver to ISS about 2.5 tons of cargo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fun Stuff...

 

 

 

 

From yesterday.....Variable Density Tunnel (VDT) ....a bit more info....

 

 

Variable Density Tunnel (VDT)

 

The VDT was controlled from this panel on an elevated platform. Note the all-important pressure gauge above the panel and the technicians peering through portholes at the model inside. The pressure shell’s riveted construction is clearly evident.  NASA
 
Image #: L-484
Date: Circa 1929

 

Variable Density Tunnel

 

Quote

The Variable Density Tunnel was a wind tunnel at NASA's Langley Research Center. It is a National Historic Landmark. It was the world's first variable density wind tunnel that allowed accurate testing with small-scale models. It was actively used as a wind tunnel from the early 1920s until the 1940s.

 

Quote

Accurate wind tunnel testing requires matching the Reynolds number of the model with that of the actual aircraft. The Reynolds number is the ratio of inertia forces to the viscous forces in the flow. It is computed as the product of the air density, ρ, the speed of the air relative to the aircraft, V, and the characteristic length scale, L, divided by the viscosity of air, μ. For an airfoil, the characteristic length is usually the chord length. If a full-scale airfoil is to be simulated in a wind tunnel by a small-scale model, the Reynolds number can only be matched by increasing the velocity or its density or by decreasing its viscosity. If air is used in the wind tunnel with a small-scale model, either the speed or the density of the air must be increased.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_Density_Tunnel

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynolds_number

 

Treasure trove of info and photo's....

https://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/historic/Variable_Density_Tunnel

http://flashbak.com/incredible-photos-of-vintage-nasa-wind-tunnels-38212/

 

:D

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Draggendrop    5,747

NASA ISS Weekly Space to Ground Report - 10 February 2017

 

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NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

Spaceref.com link

 

Space to Ground: Who Doesn't Enjoy a Good View of Planet Earth?: 02/10/2017

video is 2:39 min.

 

 

 

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Static Fire Sets Stage for Launch of Cargo Mission

 

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NASA

 

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The SpaceX launch teams on Sunday conducted a static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket that is being prepared to send a cargo-laden Dragon spacecraft like the one pictured above to the International Space Station. Liftoff is scheduled for no earlier than Saturday, Feb. 18, at 10:01 a.m. from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be the first launch from that pad since the space shuttle’s last mission in July 2011.

 

The mission will not launch astronauts, but will carry almost three tons of experiments and supplies for the residents of the orbiting laboratory. After two days in orbit, the Dragon capsule will approach close enough for the station’s robotic arm to grab the capsule and connect it to a port.

 

Astronauts will unpack the Dragon and load it with completed experiments and other materials that need to be returned to Earth. The Dragon’s mission is to last several weeks and will conclude with the capsule parachuting safely into the Pacific Ocean where it will be retrieved. Top photo by NASA, side photo by SpaceX.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2017/02/13/static-fire-sets-stage-for-launch-of-cargo-mission/

 

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Life Science Preps and Software Updates at Station

 

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The Progress 64 resupply ship is pictured departing the station Jan. 31, 2017.  NASA

 

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The Expedition 50 crew is getting the International Space Station ready for new experiments that will be delivered on the next SpaceX Dragon resupply mission. The station is also receiving a software update for its navigation and control systems.

 

Dragon is set to deliver new research gear for a variety of experiments exploring the benefits and risks of living in space. The crew began setting up the station today for a pair of those studies that will explore life science.

 

Cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko began installing habitats to house rodents for an exploration into bone and tissue loss caused by microgravity. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson set up new gear in the Microgravity Science Glovebox to cultivate human stem cells for evaluating their use in treating disease.

 

New software has been uplinked to the station to update its Guidance, Navigation and Control systems and its Command and Control systems. The updates will improve communications with spacecraft approaching the station and add new computer connectivity with docked vehicles.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/13/life-science-preps-and-software-updates-at-station/

 

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Algae Survive Heat, Cold and Cosmic Radiation Outside of the Space Station

 

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External exposure facility on ISS   NASA

 

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In a long-term experiment on the International Space Station, Fraunhofer researchers studied how the extreme conditions in space affect algae. Fraunhofer conducted this experiment in close cooperation with German and international partners. Research findings could benefit industrial applications and perhaps a mission to Mars.

 

They're alive! Two algae survived 16 months on the exterior of the International Space Station ISS despite extreme temperature fluctuations and the vacuum of space as well as considerable UV and cosmic radiation. That was the astonishing result of an experiment conducted by Dr. Thomas Leya at the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI in Potsdam in cooperation with German and international partners. This labor-intensive experiment was part of the large-scale Biology and Mars Experiment (BIOMEX), a project coordinated by Dr. Jean-Pierre de Vera at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin. Dr. Leya himself had isolated the green algal strain CCCryo 101-99 of Sphaerocystis sp. on Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago, and prepared it together with the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. (CCCryo 231-06), a blue-green alga from Antarctica. CCCryo stands for Culture Collection of Cryophilic Algae. Nostoc sp. and Sphaerocystis sp. are examples of cold-loving, or cryophilic, strains. They have special adaptation strategies to oppose cold and desiccation, allowing them to survive even under extreme conditions.

 

Dr. Leya heads the Extremophile Research & Biobank CCCryo Working Group at Fraunhofer's Bioanalytics and Bioprocesses IZI-BB branch in Potsdam. For the past 18 years, the group has been studying the survival strategies of cryophilic algae, cyanobacteria, mosses, fungi and bacteria found in polar regions. Researchers had already ascertained in the laboratory that algae are largely unsusceptible to long-term desiccaton stress, extreme temperatures or UV radiation. Yet the extreme conditions of near-Earth orbit cannot be fully simulated in labs.

 

"We slightly desiccated the algal strains in preparation for their time in space," explains Dr. Leya. A Progress spacecraft transported the organisms into space on July 23, 2014, and a Soyuz capsule returned the algal cultures to Earth. All in all, they had to endure some 16 months on the outside of the ISS - with only neutral-density filters reducing the effects of radiation. Sensors measured and logged temperature changes and amounts of cosmic radiation.

more at the link...

http://astrobiology.com/2017/02/algae-survive-heat-cold-and-cosmic-radiation-outside-of-the-space-station.html

 

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The Bahamas Seen From Orbit

 

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Shane Kimbrough @astro_kimbrough Striking beauty of the Bahamas!   NASA

 

http://spaceref.com/earth/the-bahamas-seen-from-orbit.html

 

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Seychelles Seen From Orbit

 

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Thomas Pesquet: One of the beautiful Seychelles islands in the Indian Ocean.   ESA/NASA

 

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/seychelles-seen-from-orbit.html

 

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NASA Announces Awards to Develop Oxygen Recovery Technologies for Future Deep Space Missions

 

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Press Release From: NASA HQ 
Posted:

NASA has selected two proposals for the development of oxygen recovery technologies that could help astronauts breathe a little easier on deep space, long-duration missions. The agency will invest as much as $2 million and 24 months for the development of each proposal into a complete and integrated system for NASA testing.

 

“The development of advanced life support technologies will allow NASA to establish improved capabilities for future deep space, long-duration, human exploration missions,” said Steve Jurczyk, associate administrator of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) in Washington. “The selected proposals represent the best value to the agency and strong investments for STMD.”

 

The selected proposals are:

- Phase II Methane Pyrolysis System for High-Yield Soot-Free Recovery of Oxygen from Carbon Dioxide – Honeywell Aerospace in Phoenix

- Continuous Bosch Reactor – UMPQUA Research Co. in Myrtle Creek, Oregon

 

The state-of-the-art system currently used on the International Space Station recovers about 50 percent of the oxygen from exhaled carbon dioxide. The remaining oxygen required for crew respiration is transported to the station from Earth. For long-duration missions beyond low-Earth orbit, resupply of oxygen becomes economically and logistically prohibitive. To mitigate these challenges, NASA’s Next Generation Life Support Spacecraft Oxygen Recovery project element is targeting development of technology to increase the recovery of oxygen to 75 percent or more, thereby reducing the total oxygen resupply required for future missions.

 

These awards are managed by the Game Changing Development (GCD) program within STMD. NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, manages the GCD program. The GCD program is funded by STMD, which is responsible for developing the cross-cutting, pioneering, new technologies and capabilities needed by the agency to achieve its current and future missions.

 

For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

For more information about the Game Changing Development program, visit:

http://gameon.nasa.gov

// end //

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=50422

 

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February 22 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch scheduled last carrier rocket "Soyuz-U" - http: // www. roscosmos.ru/23240/ 

 

 

ROSCOSMOS. Launch of the latest rocket "Soyuz-U" is planned 22 FEBRUARY

 

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13.02.2017 18:12
February 22, 2017 from Baikonur last scheduled launch rocket (RN) "Soyuz-U" - the most massive and one of the most reliable modifications to the family of the legendary "Soyuz". It is planned that the last booster will orbit the transport cargo ship "Progress MS-05" with cargo for the International Space Station.
 
Carrier rocket "Soyuz-U" operated since 1973. It was intended to launch into orbit transfer vehicles, space vehicles special, technological, medical and biological purposes (such as "Foton" and "Bion"), as well as unmanned spacecraft of different types. At the moment, the production of "Soyuz-U" is completed.
 
Developed on the basis of the previous versions of R-7A, "Soyuz-U" repeats the design-layout scheme of "sevens", the founder of which is the team of SP Korolev. Carrier rocket "Soyuz-U" (11A511U) was developed by a team of design bureau under the guidance of DI Kozlov and serially produced at the Samara plant "Progress" (now - RCC "Progress").
 
It used analog control system, made by a redundant circuit. The difference of carrier rockets "Soyuz-U" from its predecessors is the use of motors of the first and second stages with increased power characteristics. All three stages of the launch vehicle mounted engines running on fuel oxygen-kerosene.
 
Total at the beginning of 2017 was carried out 788 launches of carrier rockets "Soyuz-U", of which only 22 start - emergency. Confirmed indicator of operational reliability "Soyuz-U" - 0.972.

http://www.roscosmos.ru/23240/

 

:D

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 13 February 2017 - Prepping for New Science Experiments

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_image_02

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson (left) and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Thomas Pesquet take part in a conference with ground experts to discuss the upcoming robotic capture of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft. Pesquet and NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough will operate the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to capture the uncrewed spacecraft before it is attached to the station. Credit: NASA.

 

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The Expedition 50 crew is getting the International Space Station ready for new experiments that will be delivered on the next SpaceX Dragon resupply mission. The station is also receiving a software update for its navigation and control systems.

 

Dragon is set to deliver new research gear for a variety of experiments exploring the benefits and risks of living in space. The crew began setting up the station today for a pair of those studies that will explore life science.

 

Cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko began installing habitats to house rodents for an exploration into bone and tissue loss caused by microgravity. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson set up new gear in the Microgravity Science Glovebox to cultivate human stem cells for evaluating their use in treating disease.

 

New software has been uplinked to the station to update its Guidance, Navigation and Control systems and its Command and Control systems. The updates will improve communications with spacecraft approaching the station and add new computer connectivity with docked vehicles.

 

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Solar: Saturday, February 11, 2017 was the last day of the Solar Sun Visibility Window and last science measurements, before final switch off of Solar Wednesday, February 15. All activities leading up to Saturday were successfully completed per schedule. The Solar instruments saw their last sunlight and the Solar platform performed its very last tracking after many thousands of tracking cycles over 9 years. More SOLSPEC calibrations are scheduled on Monday. The Solar platform will be powered off and removed for return on SpaceX-12. Solar is a monitoring observatory that will measure the solar spectral irradiance. Apart from scientific contributions for solar and stellar physics, the knowledge of the solar energy irradiance into the Earth's atmosphere and its variations is of great importance for atmospheric modeling, atmospheric chemistry and climatology. The three experiments mounted on Solar are Solar Variable and Irradiance Monitor (SOVIM) observing the near-ultraviolet, visible and thermal regions of the spectrum (200 nanometers - 100 micrometers); SOLar SPECtral Irradiance Measurements (SOLSPEC) observing the 180 - 3000 nanometer range with high spectral resolution; and SOLar Auto-Calibrating Extreme UV/UV Spectrometers (SOLACES) measures the EUV/UV spectrum range (17 nanometers - 220 nanometers) with moderate spectral resolution.

 

Transition to (X2) R15 Software: As part of the R15 software transition, the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDMs) were transitioned to updated software today. Updates to the GNC MDMs include:

Add Portable Computer System (PCS) connectivity to docked vehicles
Provide Visiting Vehicle (VV) interface for a VV with two processors communicating on different buses at each International Docking Adapter (IDA) location
Rate Gyro Assembly (RGA) recovery should assure at least two rate sources are available
Incorporate the Flight Software (FSW) Patch Loader
Provide attitude recovery without using Russian data following a GNC checkpoint transition without Loss of Attitude Control (LoAC)
The Command & Control (C&C) MDMs will be updated tomorrow. Updates to the C&C MDMs include:

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
X2R15 Software transition

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 02/14: RFID Kit Install, PCS Deploy, JEMAL Repress, RR-4 MSG Setup, WHC Pre-Treat Tank R&R
Wednesday, 02/15: JOTI RELL Removal, SAM Install, RFID Kit Install, Vision test, Glacier Dessicant, PCS R18 P&I, CUCU Activate
Thursday, 02/16: Cubesat Install, Dragon OBT, Eye Exams

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-13-february-2017---prepping-for-new-science-experiments.html

 

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Station Gets New Software and Life Science Gear

 

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The International Space Station is continuing to receive software updates to improve its spacecraft communications and navigation systems. Meanwhile, the astronauts today are setting up new life science gear and testing the docking ability of tiny internal satellites.

 

New software is being uplinked and installed on the station this week to increase the communications and control of approaching spacecraft. The crew will also replace portable computer hard drives with new ones after the software transition.

 

SpaceX is looking to launch its Dragon cargo craft no earlier than Feb. 18 on a two-day trip to deliver crew supplies and new science experiments to the Expedition 50 crew. One study being shipped on Dragon will explore healing and tissue regeneration to fight bone and tissue loss in space. Habitats with telemetry and video were installed for the study and will house rodents being launched aboard Dragon.

 

A pair of bowling ball-sized satellites, known as SPHERES, were deployed inside the Kibo lab module to test new algorithms and docking techniques. The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) are used for numerous experiments including today’s study to demonstrate the ability for future spacecraft to autonomously dock and undock.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/14/station-gets-new-software-and-life-science-gear/

 

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NASA to Launch Raven to Develop Autonomous Rendezvous Capability

 

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Launching soon, aboard the 10th SpaceX commercial resupply mission, will be a technology module called Raven, which will bring NASA one step closer to having a relative navigation capability. When affixed outside the International Space Station, Raven will test foundational technologies that will enable autonomous rendezvous in space, meaning they will not necessitate any human involvement — even from the ground.

 

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Raven will demonstrate the capability of a groundbreaking relative navigation system, housed within its carry-on luggage-sized frame, which will allow a spacecraft server to find, and if necessary, catch its intended target. Raven aims to lead to a fully developed, mature system available for future NASA missions.

 

Five days after launch, Raven will be removed from the unpressurized “trunk” of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft by the Dextre robotic arm, and attached on a payload platform outside the space station. From this perch, Raven will begin providing information for the development of a mature real-time relative navigation system.

 

During its stay aboard the space station, Raven’s components will join forces to independently image and track incoming and outgoing visiting space station spacecraft. To do this, Raven’s sensors will feed data they “see” to a processor, which will run sets of instructions (also known as special pose algorithms) to gauge the relative distance between Raven and the spacecraft it is tracking. Then, based on these calculations, the processor will autonomously send commands that swivel the Raven module on its gimbal, or pointing system, to keep the sensors trained on the vehicle, while continuing to tracking it. While these maneuvers take place, NASA operators on the ground will evaluate how Raven’s technologies work together as a system, and will make adjustments to increase Raven’s tracking performance.

 

Over its two-year lifespan, Raven will test these critical technologies that are expected to support future NASA missions for decades to come. One upcoming application for this technology is its use in the Restore-L servicing mission which will navigate to refuel Landsat 7, a U.S. government Earth-observing satellite already in orbit. An additional application is the potential use for systems on NASA’s Journey to Mars. Raven is on track to advance and mature the sensors, machine vision algorithms, and processing necessary to implement a robust autonomous rendezvous and docking system for NASA. SSPD is developing and managing both the Raven and Restore-L demonstration missions.

more at the link...

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasa-to-launch-raven-to-develop-autonomous-rendezvous-capability

 

https://sspd.gsfc.nasa.gov/Raven.html

 

https://sspd.gsfc.nasa.gov/Relative_Navigation_System.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raven is Heading to the International Space Station

video is 1:01 min.

 

 

 

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livestream of "solar" shutdown

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 14 February 2017 - SPHERES Deployed in Kibo Module

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_image_02

NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough is seen executing the SPHERES-RINGS experiment aboard the International Space Station. The investigation uses two small, self-contained satellites (SPHERES) fitted with donut-like rings (RINGS) to test wireless power transfer and formation flight using electromagnetic fields. Credit: NASA.

 

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The International Space Station is continuing to receive software updates to improve its spacecraft communications and navigation systems. Meanwhile, the astronauts today are setting up new life science gear and testing the docking ability of tiny internal satellites.

 

New software is being uplinked and installed on the station this week to increase the communications and control of approaching spacecraft. The crew will also replace portable computer hard drives with new ones after the software transition.

 

SpaceX is looking to launch its Dragon cargo craft no earlier than Feb. 18 on a two-day trip to deliver crew supplies and new science experiments to the Expedition 50 crew. One study being shipped on Dragon will explore healing and tissue regeneration to fight bone and tissue loss in space. Habitats with telemetry and video were installed for the study and will house rodents being launched aboard Dragon.

 

A pair of bowling ball-sized satellites, known as SPHERES, were deployed inside the Kibo lab module to test new algorithms and docking techniques. The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) are used for numerous experiments including today's study to demonstrate the ability for future spacecraft to autonomously dock and undock.

 

Quote

Transition to (X2) R15 Software: As part of the R15 software transition, two of the three Command and Control (C&C) Multiplexer/Demultiplexers (MDMs) were transitioned to updated software today. Updates to the C&C MDMs include:

Visiting Vehicle Support
Implement modified capability for loading patches
Modification to Rapid Depress Auto-Response
Dual Integrated Communications Unit (ICU) Capability
Increase number of Telemetry Format Versions to meet VV Requirements
Improvements to Longeron Shadowing Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) response
Following the C&C transition to CCS R5 the crew replaced the Portable Computer System (PCS) hard drives with new ones.

 

Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect Rodent Research-4 (RR-4) Preparations: The crew continued with RR-4 preparation activities prior to SpaceX-10 (SpX-10) planned arrival on Monday, February 20. This morning the crew completed the habitat installation activities, installing Habitats C and D. Telemetry and video were received from both Habitats. The crew also configured the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Life Science Ancillary Hardware (LSAH) for RR-4 operations. The LSAH provides ability to decontaminate the MSG work volume after execution of any experiment with biological hazards. Both the RR-4 and Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) payloads will have their own LSAH configurations within the MSG.

 

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Logistics Installation: The crew completed the RFID Logistics installation this morning, configuring antennas in Node 1. This afternoon, they configured the RFID Logistics Readers and Antennas in the Lab. After each installation, the crew photographed the configuration and downlinked for ground team evaluation. The RFID Logisitics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
X2R15 Software transition - C&C MDMs
N3 MCA Full Calibration
JEM A/L repress and leak check

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 02/15: JOTI RELL Removal, SAM Install, RFID Kit Install, Vision test, Glacier Desiccant, PCS R18 P&I, CUCU Activate
Thursday, 02/16: Google Street View - Cupola, Dragon OBT, Eye Exams
Friday, 02/17: Dragon ROBoT Session, Cubesat Deployer Install

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-14-february-2017---spheres-deployed-in-kibo-module.html

 

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Commander Sets Up Dragon Gear and Looks to April Crew Swap

 

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The Expedition 50 crew is getting ready for the upcoming SpaceX CRS-10 mission to resupply the International Space Station. Commander Shane Kimbrough checked out SpaceX communications gear today so the astronauts can monitor the approach and rendezvous of the Dragon cargo craft.

SpaceX is targeting Feb. 18 to launch its Dragon space freighter atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Dragon is scheduled to arrive at the station two days later for a robotic capture and a month-long stay at the Harmony module

 

Kimbrough also joined Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet for periodic eye exams during the afternoon. The trio started the day collecting blood and urine samples and stowing them in a science freezer for later analysis on the ground. The ongoing human research helps doctors understand how living in space affects astronauts as NASA plans longer-term missions farther out into space.

 

Kimbrough and his Soyuz MS-02 crewmates Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko are now set to return to Earth April 10 officially ending the Expedition 50 mission. Whitson will become Expedition 51 commander and continue her stay on the station with fellow crew members Pesquet and cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy.

 

Two new Expedition 51 crew members will launch to the station April 20. Veteran cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and NASA astronaut Jack Fischer will take a single-day ride inside the Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft to begin their mission on orbit.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/15/commander-sets-up-dragon-gear-and-looks-to-april-crew-swap/

 

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Schedule of CRS-10 Events Available

 

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file image NASA

 

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For a look at the activities for news media and NASA Social participants leading up to the launch of CRS-10, go to http://go.nasa.gov/2l8ZkIF

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2017/02/15/schedule-of-crs-10-events-available/

 

SpaceX CRS-10 Briefings and Events

 

Quote

NASA provider SpaceX is scheduled to launch its tenth Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station no earlier than Saturday, Feb. 18. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 8:30 a.m. EST.

 

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is targeting liftoff on the company's Falcon 9 rocket at 10:01 a.m. from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying science research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory in support of the Expedition 50 and 51 crew members.

 

About 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit, deploy its solar arrays and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. SpaceX also is planning to attempt to land its Falcon 9 first stage on land.

 

After a two-day trip, Shane Kimbrough of NASA and Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) will use the station’s robotic arm to capture Dragon when it arrives on station. The spacecraft will be berthed to the Earth-facing port on the Harmony module. By the next day, the crew will pressurize the vestibule between the station and Dragon, and then open the hatch that leads to the forward bulkhead of Dragon.

 

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture Monday, Feb. 20, will begin at 7:30 a.m. on NASA TV, with installation set to begin at 11:30 a.m. 

 

For about a month, crew members will unload the spacecraft and reload it with cargo to return to Earth. About five-and-a-half hours after it departs the station March 21, it will splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California.

 

Media at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida will have the opportunity to participate in special tours and briefings Feb. 16 and 17, as well as view the launch. The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed. For more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

 

If the launch does not occur Saturday, Feb. 18, the next launch opportunity is 9:38 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 19, with NASA TV coverage starting at 8 a.m.

more at the link...

https://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-crs-10-briefings-and-events

 

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Solar

 

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SOLAR studies the Sun with unprecedented accuracy across most of its spectral range. Apart from contributing to solar and stellar physics and increasing our knowledge of how the Sun interacts with Earth's atmosphere, the facility is of great importance for modelling our atmosphere, its chemistry as well as helping climatologists.

 

SOLAR has been monitoring our Sun’s output since it was installed outside ESA’s Columbus in February 2008. The instrument was designed to work for only 18 months, but it is still running – its operation is exceeding all expectations.

 

In 2012, the International Space Station turned itself to position SOLAR to track the Sun for a complete solar day – around a month of Earth days. It was the first time the Station changed attitude for scientific reasons alone.

 

SOLAR’s observations are improving our understanding of the Sun and allowing scientists to create accurate computer models and predict its behaviour. The more accurate data we acquire, the more we will understand our nearest star’s influence on Earth.

 

The SOLAR payload consists of three instruments complementing each other to allow measurements of the solar spectral irradiance throughout virtually the whole electromagnetic spectrum - from 17 nm to 100 μm - in which 99% of the solar energy is emitted.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Columbus/SOLAR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Roscosmos, the Commission defined a work plan for the International Space Station in February-April 2017 http: // www. roscosmos.ru/23246/ 

 

ROSCOSMOS. TIMETABLE FOR THE PROGRAMME ISS

 

Quote

15.02.2017 19:56
Roscosmos, the Commission defined a work plan for the International Space Station (ISS) in February-April 2017.


Launch cargo spacecraft "Progress MS-05" is planned to February 22, 2017;


Start of manned spacecraft (TPC) "MS-04 Alliance" - April 20, 2017.


Planting crew TPK "Soyuz MS-02" as part of the astronauts Roscosmos: commander and flight engineer Sergei Ryzhikov Andrei Borisenko and flight engineer TPK, commander of the ISS Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Robert Shane Kimbrough will be held on April 10, 2017.

http://www.roscosmos.ru/23246/

 

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New Zealand's Taranaki Volcano Seen From Orbit

 

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Thomas Pesquet: The Taranaki volcano in New Zealand is a perfect round emerging from the green forest. They say it looks like Mount Fuji in Japan, I hope to capture Mount Fuji too one day.  ESA/NASA

 

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/new-zealands-taranaki-volcano-seen-from-orbit.html

 

:D

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 15 February 2017 - SpaceX Dragon Set to Launch Saturday

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_image_02

Falcon 9 rocket now vertical at Cape Canaveral on launch complex 39-A. This is the same launch pad used by the Saturn V rocket that first took people to the moon in 1969. We are honored to be allowed to use it. Credit: Elon Musk/SpaceX.

 

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The Expedition 50 crew is getting ready for the upcoming SpaceX CRS-10 mission to resupply the International Space Station. Commander Shane Kimbrough checked out SpaceX communications gear today so the astronauts can monitor the approach and rendezvous of the Dragon cargo craft.

SpaceX is targeting Feb. 18 to launch its Dragon space freighter atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Dragon is scheduled to arrive at the station two days later for a robotic capture and a month-long stay at the Harmony module.

 

Kimbrough also joined Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet for periodic eye exams during the afternoon. The trio started the day collecting blood and urine samples and stowing them in a science freezer for later analysis on the ground. The ongoing human research helps doctors understand how living in space affects astronauts as NASA plans longer-term missions farther out into space.

 

Kimbrough and his Soyuz MS-02 crewmates Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko are now set to return to Earth April 10 officially ending the Expedition 50 mission. Whitson will become Expedition 51 commander and continue her stay on the station with fellow crew members Pesquet and cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy.

 

Two new Expedition 51 crew members will launch to the station April 20. Veteran cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and NASA astronaut Jack Fischer will take a single-day ride inside the Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft to begin their mission on orbit.

 

Quote

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Logistics: Yesterday, the crew installed antennas in the Lab and Node 1 modules. After activation, ground teams identified Node 1 Reader 1 was not providing data. Based on downlink photos teams determined that a power cable was not connected. Today, the crew completed the RFID Logistics hardware in Node 2 and successfully connected the power cable to the Node 1 Reader 1 recovering the Node 1 capabilities. The RFID Logistics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station.

 

Solar Platform Powerdown: With the completion of the Solar experiment the Solar platform was unpowered for the final time. The Solar platform is planned to return on SpaceX-12. Solar is a monitoring observatory that will measure the solar spectral irradiance. Apart from scientific contributions for solar and stellar physics, the knowledge of the solar energy irradiance into the Earth's atmosphere and its variations is of great importance for atmospheric modeling, atmospheric chemistry and climatology. The three experiments mounted on Solar are Solar Variable and Irradiance Monitor (SOVIM) observing the near-ultraviolet, visible and thermal regions of the spectrum (200 nanometers - 100 micrometers); SOLar SPECtral Irradiance Measurements (SOLSPEC) observing the 180 - 3000 nanometer range with high spectral resolution; and SOLar Auto-Calibrating Extreme UV/UV Spectrometers (SOLACES) measures the EUV/UV spectrum range (17 nanometers - 220 nanometers) with moderate spectral resolution.

 

SpaceX-10 Preparation: The crew, along with ground specialists, performed a nominal checkout the COTS UHF Communication Unit (CUCU) system. Dragon Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) requires two fully functional ISS CUCU equipment strings. CUCU is critical for Relative Global Positioning System (RGPS) navigation and is required for Dragon telemetry and command during final R-bar approach when the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) link may be blocked by ISS structure.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight the Ground Robotic Controllers will stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), walk the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off to Node2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) and maneuver SSRMS to the offset grapple park position.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
X2R15 Software transition - PL and LA-1 MDMs
MSS Operations - SPDM stow, SSRMS walkoff N2

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Thursday, 02/16: Google Street View - Cupola/N3/PMM, Dragon OBT, Eye Exams
Friday, 02/17: Dragon ROBoT Session, Cubesat Deployer Install
Saturday, 02/18: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty, SpaceX-10 Launch

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-15-february-2017---spacex-dragon-set-to-launch-saturday.html

 

SAGE-III Ready for Ozone Checkup

video is 1:19 min.

 

 

 

------------------------

 

Dragon Capture Training and Robonaut Power Check Today

 

blog_iss050e037547.jpg

Expedition 50 astronauts (from left) Peggy Whitson, Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet pose with the humanoid Robonaut.  NASA/ESA

 

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Three Expedition 50 crew members practiced today the robotic capture of the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship when it arrives at the International Space Station two days after its launch. A humanoid robot, better known as Robonaut, had its power supply checked out during a full day of troubleshooting.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet partnered up and practiced capturing the Dragon cargo ship using the Canadarm2 robotic arm. The duo will be in the cupola Monday morning to capture Dragon following its 10:01 a.m. EST Saturday launch from Kennedy Space Center. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson will assist her crewmates and monitor Dragon’s approach and rendezvous.

 

Dragon is packing nearly 5,500 pounds of crew supplies, station gear and advanced science experiments. Some of the research will look at new technologies to improve space travel, observation gear to study Earth’s ozone and processes to improve how medicine works.

 

Whitson worked throughout the day on the robotic astronaut assistant, Robonaut. She opened up Robonaut’s torso and checked its cables and computer cards searching for an intermittent fault in its power supply. Robonaut is being tested for its ability to assist astronauts in the future with routine tasks and high risk activities.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/16/dragon-capture-training-and-robonaut-power-check-today/

 

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Feb. 22:

 

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A Soyuz-U rocket to launch a Progress MS-05 (No. 435) cargo ship from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. The mission was originally planned for Oct. 16, 2016, and by the end of 2016, it was postponed from February 1 to Feb. 21, 2017, 17:11 Moscow Time, in the wake of the Progress MS-04 accident. In January 2017, new delays pushed the launch from February 1 to March 1, however it was then set for February 22 at 08:58:33 Moscow Time.

 

In preparation for launch, the loading of dry items into the front cargo section of the spacecraft was completed on February 7. On February 10, the mission management and the State Commission overseeing the launch confirmed readiness of the spacecraft for fueling with propellant and pressurized gases. The operation was completed on February 14, 2017.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/2017.html#ms05

 

postfueling_02-14_1.jpg

Progress MS-05 is being installed in the test rig at Site 254 in Baikonur after the completion of fueling operations on Feb. 14, 2017.

 

 

po_docking_1.jpg

On February 16, Progress MS-05 was integrated with a launch vehicle adapter.

 

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San Francisco, California, USA February 11, 2017

 

san-francisco-20170211-web.jpg

A clear view amid California's rainy winter of Planet’s Headquarters, reveals more than just expanse of the Golden Gate Bridge, Park, and Bay Bridge, but the dramatic sediment pulled from the 4,600 square miles of the San Francisco Bay watershed.   Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/san-francisco-20170211/

 

:D

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 16 February 2017 - Dragon Capture Test and Robonaut Maintenance

 

Quote

Three Expedition 50 crew members practiced today the robotic capture of the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship when it arrives at the International Space Station two days after its launch. A humanoid robot, better known as Robonaut, had its power supply checked out during a full day of troubleshooting.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet partnered up and practiced capturing the Dragon cargo ship using the Canadarm2 robotic arm. The duo will be in the cupola Monday morning to capture Dragon following its 10:01 a.m. EST Saturday launch from Kennedy Space Center. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson will assist her crewmates and monitor Dragon's approach and rendezvous.

 

Dragon is packing nearly 5,500 pounds of crew supplies, station gear and advanced science experiments. Some of the research will look at new technologies to improve space travel, observation gear to study Earth's ozone and processes to improve how medicine works.

 

Whitson worked throughout the day on the robotic astronaut assistant, Robonaut. She opened up Robonaut's torso and checked its cables and computer cards searching for an intermittent fault in its power supply. Robonaut is being tested for its ability to assist astronauts in the future with routine tasks and high risk activities.

 

Quote

Google Street View: After having a conference with ground support teams, the crew configured on-board digital cameras with a fisheye lens to capture 360 degree images of the Cupola, Node 3, and PMM modules. Additional ISS modules will be mapped to provide an imaged topology to be used for educational community outreach.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2). Then the SSRMS was walked off MBS PDGF1 onto Node2 PDGF. Finally, SSRMS was maneuvered to the Offset Grapple Park position for the SpX-10 Crew Offset grapple practice. MSS performance today was nominal.

 

SpaceX-10 (SpX-10) On-Board Training (OBT) Offset Grapple Practice: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Serving System (MSS) and performed a SpX-10 Offset Grapple practice session. Ground Controllers also performed the MSS Pre-Launch Checkouts. The USOS crew practiced maneuvering the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into the grapple envelope of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF). After the Offset Grapples Practice session, the crew participated in a conference with ground specialists. Robotics ground controllers then maneuvered the SSRMS to the Rendezvous Park Position in preparation for SpX-10 capture on February 20th.

 

Quote

Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
X2R15 Software transition - PL and LA-1 MDMs

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Friday, 02/17: Dragon ROBoT Session, Cubesat Deployer Install
Saturday, 02/18: Weekly Housekeeping, Crew Off Duty, SpaceX-10 Launch
Sunday, 02/19: Crew Off Duty

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA)- Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Process
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-16-february-2017---dragon-capture-test-and-robonaut-maintenance.html

 

------------------------

 

The Launch Day Ahead

 

KSC-20170216-PH_GEB01_0210-1024x683.jpg

NASA

 

Quote

Our launch day coverage of the SpaceX CRS-10 mission will begin at 8:30 a.m. EST on NASA TV and here on the NASA Launch Blog leading up to liftoff, which is scheduled for 10:01 a.m. EST from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A SpaceX Falcon 9 is being prepped to launch the company’s Dragon spacecraft into orbit carrying about 5,500 pounds of equipment and experiments to the International Space Station. For a look at the mission including some of the payloads, read our launch preview at http://go.nasa.gov/2lnx2wb

 

And don’t forget you can tune in to NASA TV at 5 p.m. today for the latest status update from the pre-launch news briefing from Kennedy. See you tomorrow morning! Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2017/02/17/the-launch-day-ahead/

 

 

NASA to Televise International Space Station Cargo Ship Launch, Docking

 

Quote

Press Release From: NASA HQ 
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2017

 

NASA Television will provide live coverage of the launch and docking of a Russian cargo spacecraft delivering almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the International Space Station beginning at 12:30 a.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 22.

Launch of the unpiloted Russian Progress 66 is scheduled for 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The spacecraft is set to dock to the Pirs docking compartment at 3:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24. NASA TV coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin at 2:45 a.m. Progress 66 will remain docked at the station for almost four months before departing in June for its deorbit into Earth’s atmosphere.

This is the first launch of a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur since the Progress 65 supply craft was lost Dec. 1, 2016.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Keep up with the International Space Station, and its research and crews, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on social media at:

http://instagram.com/iss

http://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

 

// end //

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=50447

 

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Quote

Baikonur continue to prepare "space truck" # ProgressMS05 to launch -http: // www. roscosmos.ru/23254/ .

 

ROSCOSMOS. PREPARATION CONTINUES TGK "Progress MS-05"

 

Quote

The "Progress MS-05" for the launch of the launch vehicle (LV) "Soyuz-U" assembly and testing of spacecraft (pl.254) Baikonur Cosmodrome, work is continuing on the preparation of the cargo vehicle (THC). Joint calculations RKK "Energy" and RCC "Progress" have completed the technological operations knurled fairing of the launch vehicle "Soyuz-U" on TGC. Prior to this, RSC "Energia" specialists conducted Designers inspection of the cargo vehicle of a new series.
 
In accordance with the schedule of preparatory work headunit with THC "Progress MS-05" it will be transported to the assembly-test building rockets for the general assembly of the rocket.
 
Starting TGK "Progress MS-05" scheduled for February 22, 2017. This will be the last launch of "Soyuz-U" - the most massive and one of the most reliable modifications to the family of the legendary "Soyuz". The cargo ship will deliver to ISS about 2.5 tons of cargo, including dry cargo, fuel, water, and compressed gases. The cargo compartment packed scientific equipment and components for life-support systems, as well as containers with food, clothing, medicines and personal care products for the crew members.

great slide show at the link...:D

http://www.roscosmos.ru/23254/

 

----------------------------

 

Satish Dhawan Space Centre, India February 12, 2017

 

satish-20170213-web.jpg

Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, imaged by a Dove cubesat two days before the scheduled, record-setting PSLV-C37 launch. 88 Doves—the largest ever satellite constellation—will launch from the centre to a Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO) with an approximate altitude of 500 km.  Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/satish-20170213/

 

:D

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Busy Traffic Week Ahead for Space Station Crew

 

32863903762_13f8879589_k-1024x927.jpg

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is the company’s 10th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 9:39 a.m. EST from the historic launch site now operated by SpaceX under a property agreement with NASA.

 

Quote

Two cargo craft are scheduled to deliver several tons of supplies and experiment hardware to the station this week.

 

SpaceX’s tenth commercial resupply mission lifted off at 9:39 a.m. EST on Sunday, Feb. 19. The rocket launched from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This was the first commercial launch from Kennedy’s historic pad.

 

Astronauts Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Shane Kimbrough of NASA will use the space station’s robotic arm to capture Dragon when it arrives at the station. Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 on NASA TV and the agency’s website, with installation coverage set to begin at 8:30 a.m.

 

Meanwhile, the unpiloted Russian Progress 66 is scheduled for 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The spacecraft is set to dock to the Pirs docking compartment at 3:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24.

 

Aboard the station, the crew continued preparations for the arrival of the vehicles and set up several scientific experiments and technology demonstrations.

 

The Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) was installed for a technical evaluation. MED-2 aims to demonstrate if small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/21/busy-traffic-week-ahead-for-space-station-crew/

 

--------------------------

 

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2)

 

On CRS-10

 

Quote

Experiment Description


Research Overview


Exercise is required by crew members during spaceflight to maintain health and to counter the debilitating effects of micro gravity. The current exercise equipment used in space is very bulky. Smaller exercise devices free up room for other critical equipment for space flight.
The Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) demonstrates the use of robotic technology to provide the motion and resistance needed in the device. The investigation shows that the actuator performs as predicted in the space station environment with the crew member.
This technology leads to the next generations of exercise equipment that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing systems.
Description


The Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.
 
ISS and on board crew interaction is required for this Detailed Test Objective (DTO). Current counter measure devices behave differently in the microgravity environment than in ground test as seen in both the crew interaction and sensors in the systems. To effectively evaluate the technology, an extended microgravity environment with crew interaction is required. The MED-2 is a one degree of freedom system using a robotic actuator to control the load experienced by the operation. The use of a robotic type actuator allows precise control of the load that can be varied over a variety of conditions including position and velocity of the actuator. This DTO is designed to verify that the control of the actuator with a crew member in the microgravity environment in the loop. Various modes of the actuator are assessed at various velocities. This may include constant load, progressive loads and non-linear loads based on position and/or velocity of the actuator. The performance is assessed through data collected by instrumentation on the MED-2 system as well as the perceptions of the crew member.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/862.html

 

MED-2%20plus%20rowing%20attachments%20(g

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2)  NASA

 

--------------------------------

 

NASA Live

 

Quote

Upcoming Live Events (All Times Eastern)

 

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 a.m. - NASA TV coverage of the launch of the Russian Progress 66 cargo craft to the International Space Station. Launch scheduled at 12:58 a.m.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 4:30 a.m. - NASA TV coverage of rendezvous and capture of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft to the International Space Station. Grapple is scheduled at 6 a.m.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 8:30 a.m. - Installation of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft at the International Space Station.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 1 p.m. - NASA news conference on discovery beyond our solar system. NASA will present new findings on planets that orbit stars other than our sun, known as exoplanets. The event will air live on NASA Television.

 

Friday, Feb. 24, 2:45 a.m. - Coverage of the docking of the Russian Progress 66 cargo craft to the International Space Station. Docking scheduled at 3:34 a.m.

https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

 

NASA TV

 

ustream, ISS

 

-----------------------------------

 

 

 

Dragon Cargo Craft on Track for ISS Arrival after Orbit-Raising Maneuvers

 

Quote

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft maneuvered into a higher orbit on Tuesday and is en-route to a Wednesday rendezvous with the International Space Station, aiming for a robotic capture at 11 UTC to mark the arrival of the vehicle’s precious science cargo eagerly awaited by the crew in orbit.

 

Packed with dozens of experiments, supplies for the Space Station and a group of 20 mice, Dragon lifted off atop a Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday on a three-day flight to the orbiting laboratory.

 

Sunday’s liftoff, coming at 14:39 UTC, marked the revival of Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A that used to host NASA’s Saturn V rocket and the majority of flights of the Space Shuttle before being turned over to SpaceX that will operate the pad for ISS traffic and Falcon Heavy launches.

Quote

Dragon is booked for a stay of around five weeks through late March to facilitate the transfer of cargo and a busy scientific schedule lined up for the crew to complete experiments that were delivered by Dragon and have to ride the same spacecraft back to Earth.

more at the link...

http://spaceflight101.com/dragon-spx10/dragon-spx-10-en-route-to-space-station/

 

---------------------------

 

 

 

 

Canadarm2 to capture Dragon

 

Quote

SpaceX's Dragon resupply spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday, February 22, after launching successfully on Sunday. Astronauts Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Shane Kimbrough of NASA will capture Dragon using Canadarm2. The robotics team comprised of experts from the Canadian Space Agency and NASA will then berth Dragon to the ISS. The spacecraft will spend about a month in orbit before returning to Earth during late March.

 

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 4:30 a.m. EST on Wednesday, February 22 on NASA TV and UStream, with berthing coverage set to begin at 8:30 a.m.

http://asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/iss/news.asp

 

-----------------------------

 

Progress MS-05 to resume Russian cargo supplies to ISS

 

Quote

A fresh cargo ship is poised for liftoff from Baikonur Cosmodrome on Feb. 22, 2017, resuming Russian supply missions to the International Space Station, ISS, after the failed launch of Progress MS-04 on Dec. 1, 2016. In the ISS flight manifest, the Progress MS-05 spacecraft has a designation 66P denoting the 66th Russian cargo mission heading to the outpost, while in production documentation it was designated No. 435. The mission will also mark the last launch of the Soyuz-U variant within the legendary Russian rocket family.

This will also be the first " Baikonur" launcher with the new external camera package ( similar to Vostochny).

 

pad_aerial_1.jpg

The last Soyuz-U rocket with Progress MS-05 on the launch pad in Baikonur.

 

Quote

Launch profile

A Soyuz-U rocket carrying the Progress MS-05 (No. 435) cargo ship is scheduled to lift off from Pad 5 at Site 1 in Baikonur on Feb. 22, 2017, at 08:58:33 Moscow Time (12:58 a.m. EST).

 

Following a vertical liftoff, the launch vehicle will head eastward from Baikonur matching an orbital inclination of 51.66 degrees toward the Equator.

 

Four boosters of the first stage will separate nearly two minutes into the flight, while the second stage will continue firing until 4.7 minutes into the flight.

 

The third stage is scheduled to ignite moments before the separation of the second stage, firing through a lattice structure connecting the two boosters and ensuring the continuous thrust during the entire ascent to orbit.

 

Less than 10 seconds after the separation of the second stage, the payload fairing protecting the spacecraft will split into two halves and fall off. A fraction of a second later, the aft cylindrical section of the third stage will split into three segments and drop off, ensuring the fall of all the debris into the same drop zone 1,576 kilometers from the launch site.

 

In the meantime, the third stage will keep firing until almost nine minutes into the flight. Progress MS-05 will separate from the third stage of the launch vehicle at 09:27:22 Moscow Time (1:07 a.m. EST), just over three seconds after the third stage engine shutdown.

 

Quote

Rendezvous and docking

Progress MS-05 will follow a two-day rendezvous profile with the ISS. It is scheduled to conduct an automated docking at the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the SO-1 Pirs docking compartment on the Russian segment of the ISS on Feb. 24, 2017, at 11:34 Moscow Time (3:34 a.m. EST). During the automated docking process, Russian cosmonauts Sergei Ryzhikov and Oleg Novistky will be on stand by at the manual control system, TORU, console inside the Zvezda Service Module to take over docking operations if needed.

 

Progress MS-04 will remain docked at the station for almost four months before departing in June 2017 for its deorbit into Earth’s atmosphere.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-05.html

 

------------------------------------

 

Soyuz booster rolled out to snowy Baikonur launch pad

 

Removal of "Soyuz-U" with THC "Progress MS-05"

video is 6:31 min.

 

 

 

Quote

A Soyuz rocket and Progress supply ship packed with nearly 3 tons of cargo, provisions and fuel for the International Space Station rolled out to a launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday.

The Progress MS-05 cargo freighter is set for liftoff Wednesday at 0558:33 GMT (12:58:33 a.m. EST; 11:58:33 a.m. Baikonur time) on a two-day trip to the space station.

The launch will be the last mission of the Soyuz-U version of Russia’s most-flown rocket. The Soyuz-U was a workhorse for the Russian space program, launching nearly 800 times with military spy satellites, cosmonaut crews and space station resupply missions to a series of Russian orbital outposts since 1973.

Newer versions of the expendable Soyuz booster are now flying with upgraded engines.

Wednesday’s launch will be the first Soyuz-U flight, and the first Progress cargo launch, since a rocket failure doomed a Russian resupply mission Dec. 1 on the way to the space station.

More at the link...

 

A great spread of images as well, from Roscosmos...excellent job.

 

 http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/20/soyuz-booster-rolled-out-to-snowy-baikonur-launch-pad/

 

----------------------------

 

 

 

Longest-serving rocket in history bids farewell with Progress MS-05 launch

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/02/soyuz-u-progress-ms-05-launch/

 

See a Russian Cargo Ship Launch & SpaceX Dragon Arrival Wednesday!

Space.com, long link

 

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Getting a live broadcast from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Starting freighter # ProgressMS05 at 08:58 MSK:http: // www. roscosmos.ru/317/ .

 

 

 

 

 

--------------------------

 

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/#public

 

:)

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ISS Progress 66 - Progress MS-05 launched by Soyuz-U

video is 3:47 min.

 

 

 

Dragon grapple due up in a few hours...

 

:)

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 21 February 2017 - Russian Progress 66 Launched

 

nasa_iss_on_orbit_status_report_image_02

The Russian Progress 66 launched at 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: ROSCOSMOS.

 

Quote

The unpiloted Russian Progress 66 launched at 12:58 a.m. Wednesday (11:58 a.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It is now orbiting the planet on course for the International Space Station.

 

The vehicle will deliver almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the Expedition 50 crew.

 

The spacecraft is set to dock to the Pirs docking compartment at 3:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24. NASA TV coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin at 2:45 a.m. Progress 66 will remain docked at the station for almost four months before departing in June for its deorbit into Earth's atmosphere.

 

This was the first launch of a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur since the Progress 65 supply craft was lost Dec. 1, 2016.

 

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Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Camera Cover Removal: The crew translated and rotated the CIR Optics Bench in order to access the Intensified Camera Package. They uninstalled the camera at Universal Mounting Location-2 (UML-2) at the back of the Optics Bench and removed the CIR Soft Window cover. The Intensified Camera Package was reinstalled and Optics Bench rotated back into position. During a ground checkout on February 10, teams were unable to complete a calibration of the camera packages for the Cool Flames Experiment. After investigation by ground specialists it was determined that the Window Cover was still attached. Teams will resume checkout and calibration activities of thee CIR for the Cool Flames experiment following today's completed activities. The Cool Flames Investigation will provide new insight into the phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot, then appear to go out -- but they continue burning at a much lower temperature, with no visible flames (cool flames). Understanding cool flame combustion helps scientists develop new engines and fuels that are more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

 

Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) Exchange: The crew changed out the SCA in the Solidification Quenching Furnace (SQF), removing the calibration cartridge and inserting the first test sample. Ground teams will initiate the runs next week. The Batch-2b of the Materials Science Laboratory Sample Cartridge Assemblies serves two projects investigating how different phases organize in a structure when metallic alloys are solidified. The project Metastable Solidification of Composites (METCOMP) studies the phase formed by the reaction of the remaining liquid phase with an already formed solid, to form a second solid phase on cooling. For this purpose, Bronze (Copper-Tin Alloys) of different compositions will be processed. The other project, Solidification along a Eutectic path in Ternary Alloys (SETA), looks at how two phases that form together organize into lamellar, or fiber, structures when cooling Aluminum (Copper-Silver Alloys). Both projects will provide benchmark samples that will enable to test numerical models that aim to predict these structures.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
N3 MCA Full Calibration
CUCU Broadcast Test
S-Band string 2 activation
Node 2 CBM Prep for Mate
Node 2 Nadir ACBM Inspection

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 02/22: 66Progress Launch, Dragon capture and berthing, Dragon/N2 Vestibule outfitting, Node 2 CPA Removal, ARED Arm Cable Replace
Thursday, 02/23: Dragon Ingress, Dragon Center Stack transfer, Double Cold Bag unpack, SABLE CO2 Incubator Install, TangoLab-1 card replace, MERLIN3 install, Polar 1 transfer and install, Glacier 3 transfer and install, MESC first microscope ops,
Friday, 02/24: 66P Dock, 66P ingress, 66P transfer operations, RR-4 transfer, JEMAL depress

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Process
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-21-february-2017-russian-progress-66-launched.html

 

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Crew Prepares for U.S. and Russian Space Deliveries

 

spacex_crs10_approach-1.jpg

The SpaceX Dragon was pictured from a video camera as it approached the space station Wednesday morning.

 

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NASA and SpaceX flight controllers in Houston and Hawthorne, California are reworking plans for the arrival Thursday of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft after its rendezvous to the International Space Station was aborted early Wednesday morning. The Dragon’s computers received an incorrect navigational update, triggering an automatic wave off.

 

Dragon was sent on a “racetrack” trajectory in front of, above and behind the station for a second rendezvous attempt Thursday.  Dragon is in excellent shape and neither the crew nor the station were in any danger.  NASA TV will cover its second rendezvous attempt Thursday beginning at 4 a.m. EST.

 

Expedition 50 commander Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet will be back in the cupola Thursday waiting to capture Dragon at around 6 a.m. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will be assisting the duo monitoring Dragon’s arrival and its systems.

 

A few hours before Dragon aborted its rendezvous, Russia launched its Progress 66 (66P) resupply ship from Kazakhstan on a two-day trip to the station’s Pirs docking compartment. The 66P is carrying nearly three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the six-member Expedition 50 crew. It will arrive Friday for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. and stay at the station until June. NASA TV will also cover its arrival starting at 2:45 a.m.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/22/crew-prepares-for-u-s-and-russian-space-deliveries/

 

 

SpaceX Dragon Rendezvous and Docking Waved Off for Today

 

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The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft waved off its planned rendezvous with the International Space Station at 3:25 a.m. EST. Dragon’s onboard computers triggered the abort after recognizing an incorrect value in navigational data about the location of Dragon relative to the space station.

 

Flight controllers immediately began planning for a second rendezvous attempt on Thursday, Feb. 23.

 

The spacecraft is in excellent shape with no issues, and the crew aboard the space station is safe. The next rendezvous attempt is targeted for Thursday morning. NASA TV coverage will begin at 4 a.m. with grapple expected around 6 a.m. Installation coverage will begin at 8 a.m. Watch live on NASA TV and online at: http://www.nasa.gov/live.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/22/spacex-dragon-rendezvous-and-docking-waved-off-for-today/

 

SpaceX waves off space station cargo delivery for a day

 

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SpaceX’s Dragon supply ship, loaded with nearly 5,500 pounds of cargo and experiments, aborted an approach to the International Space Station on Wednesday after encountering a problem in its GPS navigation system.

 

The gumdrop-shaped, solar-powered spacecraft was about 1,200 feet, or 365 meters, from the space station when it automatically bailed out of the rendezvous, escaping the immediate vicinity of the research outpost as its safety system intended and setting up for another approach as soon as Thursday.

 

NASA said SpaceX’s mission director at the Dragon control center in Hawthorne, California, reported the aborted rendezvous at 3:25 a.m. EST (0825 GMT) when the spacecraft ran into trouble processing GPS navigation data.

 

“The SpaceX engineers are tracing this issue to an incorrect value that was detected in the spacecraft’s Relative Global Positioning System hardware, which basically tells Dragon’s computers, for its burn plan, where it is in the sky relative to the International Space Station,” said Rob Navias, a NASA spokesperson providing commentary on NASA TV.

 

“Dragon itself is in excellent shape,” Navias added. “Its Global Positioning System hardware is also in excellent shape.”

 

The Dragon spacecraft’s navigation system works by comparing position data derived from the GPS satellites to determine the range, direction and closing rate between the visiting supply ship and the space station.

 

Once the cargo craft gets closer to the complex, the navigation system switches to inputs from a pulsed laser ranging instrument and a thermal camera to determine how far Dragon is from the space station.

The rendezvous is fully automated, with the exception of some manual abort, retreat and hold commands.

 

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Wednesday’s abort was the first such wave-off by a SpaceX supply ship in 10 cargo deliveries since 2012. NASA’s other cargo transportation provider, Orbital ATK, had to upload a software patch to one of its Cygnus logistics freighters on a flight in 2013 to correct a GPS error, delaying its arrival at the space station by a week.

 

NASA said the Dragon spacecraft went into a so-called “race track” course in front, above, and then behind the space station to set up for another rendezvous attempt Thursday, part of a predetermined trajectory to be used in case a problem prevents an on-time arrival.

 

“At no time was the station or the crew in any danger,” Navias said. “Dragon did exactly what it was supposed to do and broke out of its approach.”

Astronaut Mike Hopkins in space station mission control in Houston passed the news on to space station flight engineer Thomas Pesquet, who was preparing to capture the Dragon spacecraft with the lab’s robotic arm.

 

“I just want let you know that Dragon is on a 24-hour safe trajectory,” Hopkins said. “We had an RGPS filter unconverged, and we’re currently in the works for planning a re-attempt for tomorrow.”

 

“OK, I copy, thanks for the explanation, and I look forward to welcoming Dragon on-board tomorrow then,” Pesquet replied.

 

Shortly after 4:30 a.m. EST (0930 GMT), Hopkins radioed space station commander Shane Kimbrough that mission control aims to try for another rendezvous Thursday. If the rendezvous goes ahead, the Dragon cargo craft should be grappled by the station’s robotic arm around 6 a.m. EST (1100 GMT).

 

“Dragon has plenty of propellant,” Navias said. “Its other systems are in excellent shape, and all of the science on-board the Dragon can withstand a 24-hour re-rendezvous.”

 

The Dragon spacecraft would approach the space station from below, pausing at several hold points before reaching a “capture box” around 30 feet, or 10 meters, from the outpost.

 

Pesquet will maneuver the robotic arm to snare the free-floating spaceship, and then ground controllers will take command of the arm to berth Dragon to the station’s Harmony module for unpacking.

more at the link...

http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/22/spacex-waves-off-space-station-cargo-delivery-for-at-least-a-day/

 

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Photos launch cargo spacecraft # ProgressMS05 in high resolution are available on our website Flickr:http: // bit.ly/2lETTDW .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 22 February 2017 - Dragon Set to be Captured

 

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NASA and SpaceX flight controllers in Houston and Hawthorne, California are reworking plans for the arrival Thursday of the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft after its rendezvous to the International Space Station was aborted early Wednesday morning. The Dragon's computers received an incorrect navigational update, triggering an automatic wave off.

 

Dragon was sent on a "racetrack" trajectory in front of, above and behind the station for a second rendezvous attempt Thursday. Dragon is in excellent shape and neither the crew nor the station were in any danger. NASA TV will cover its second rendezvous attempt Thursday beginning at 4 a.m. EST.

 

Expedition 50 commander Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet will be back in the cupola Thursday waiting to capture Dragon at around 6 a.m. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will be assisting the duo monitoring Dragon's arrival and its systems.

 

A few hours before Dragon aborted its rendezvous, Russia launched its Progress 66 (66P) resupply ship from Kazakhstan on a two-day trip to the station's Pirs docking compartment. The 66P is carrying nearly three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the six-member Expedition 50 crew. It will arrive Friday for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. and stay at the station until June. NASA TV will also cover its arrival starting at 2:45 a.m.

 

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Crew Day: As a result of the aborted SpX-10 capture, ground teams have elected to make today an off-duty day for the USOS crew. As part of their off duty time today the crew performed their routine weekend housekeeping activities, since Saturday will now be a crew work day.

 

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) White Light Cable Swap: The crew performed a swap of the White Light Fiber Optic (F/O) moving the cable from one light source to the other. The light from the FIR White Light Lamps is transmitted through the cables to the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) microscope to provide lighting to the experiment sample. LMM Biophysics 1 (The Effect of Macromolecular Transport of Microgravity Protein Crystallization) launched on SpX-10. When installed, investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 1 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. By studying the crystals of a higher quality that can be grown in microgravity, scientists will be able to better understand their structure and how they work.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Configure for Dragon capture
Return to nominal configuration

 

Three-Day Look Ahead: [Note: replan of the next couple of days is in work]
Thursday, 02/23: Dragon capture and berthing, Dragon/N2 Vestibule outfitting, Node 2 CPA Removal, Dragon Ingress, Dragon Center Stack transfer, Double Cold Bag unpack
Friday, 02/24: 66P Dock, 66P ingress, 66P transfer operations, SABLE CO2 Incubator Install, TangoLab-1 card replace, MERLIN3 install, Polar 1 transfer and install, Glacier 3 transfer and install, MESC first microscope ops,
Saturday, 02/25: RR-4 transfer

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby - Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3
Operate - Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-22-february-2017---dragon-set-to-be-captured.html

 

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Dragon Attached to Station’s Harmony Module

 

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The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was berthed to the Harmony module of the International Space Station at 8:12 a.m. EST. The hatch between the newly arrived spacecraft and the Harmony module of the space station is scheduled to be opened this afternoon. The capsule will spend about four weeks attached to the station.

 

For an overview of the science delivered to station aboard Dragon, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/SX10_science

 

With Dragon now berthed to station, the Expedition 50 crew will focus on its next cargo delivery, which is scheduled to arrive in less than 24 hours. The Russian Progress 66 was launched on Wednesday, Feb. 22 from Kazakhstan. It will arrive on station Friday morning for an automated docking at 3:34 a.m. EST and remain on the station until June. NASA Television will cover its arrival beginning at 2:45 a.m. EST.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/23/dragon-attached-to-stations-harmony-module-3/

 

ISS_02-23-17.jpg

The SpaceX Dragon was successfully installed to the Harmony module a few hours after it was captured with the Canadarm2. Credit: NASA

 

SpaceX Dragon Docks With Space Station

video is 1:16 min.

 

 

 

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SpaceX supply ship completes journey to space station

 

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ESA astronaut Homas Pesquet tweeted this image of the Dragon spacecraft hovering just below the space station Thursday. Credit: Thomas Pesquet/ESA/NASA

 

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Running a day late after aborting a rendezvous to resolve a navigation glitch, SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft made a smooth final approach to the International Space Station on Thursday, floating in range of the research lab’s robot arm for capture to deliver 2.7 tons of supplies and research experiments.

 

The Dragon spacecraft took four days to travel to the complex after blasting off from the Kennedy Space Center’s launch pad 39A on Sunday, hauling food rations, space station repair equipment, and science investigations designed to monitor Earth’s ozone layer, study lightning and test out new automated navigation tools for a future satellite servicing mission.

 

The 23-foot-long (7-meter) Dragon supply ship approached the space station from below, pausing at predetermined hold points to allow for status checks by ground controllers. Mission control centers in Houston and at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California, gave a green light for the spacecraft to move to a capture box around 10 meters, or 33 feet, beneath the outpost.

 

European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet unlimbered the space station’s Canadian-built robotic arm to grapple the Dragon cargo carrier at 5:44 a.m. EST (1044 GMT), a few minutes earlier than projected in Thursday’s timeline.

 

Capture of the SpaceX-owned supply vessel occurred as the space station sailed over the northwest coast of Australia.

 

“Looks like we’ve got a great capture,” radioed space station commander Shane Kimbrough, who assisted Pesquet. “Thomas did a great job flying it.”

“Great job with Dragon capture, and sorry about the delays,” responded astronaut Mike Hopkins from mission control in Houston. “Now the real work starts.”

 

C5Wf3OFUkAAi9hP-678x381.jpg

The Dragon spacecraft was mated to the space station’s Harmony module a few hours after capture. Credit: NASA TV

 

 

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The Dragon spacecraft’s navigation lights illuminate the cargo ship during a nighttime orbital pass. Credit: Thomas Pesquet/ESA/NASA

 

Much more at the link...

http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/23/spacex-supply-ship-completes-journey-to-space-station/

 

Dragon Cargo Craft successfully Captured by Space Station Crew after extended Rendezvous

 

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Dragon’s arrival on Thursday marked the delivery of 2,490 Kilograms of cargo to the International Space Station with another two and a half metric tons inbound less than 24 hours after Dragon’s rendezvous when Progress MS-05 will link up with the Space Station for an automated docking on Friday.

 

Cargo delivered by the tenth operational Dragon mission is largely dedicated to ISS science and utilization with over half of the craft’s upmass dedicated to utilization. Riding aboard the spacecraft’s Trunk Section are a pair of external payloads to be installed on the ISS truss by the Station’s robots to carry out atmospheric studies and technical demonstrations.

 

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Among the science cargo is a group of 20 mice huddled inside the Dragon since late cargo loading last Friday and set for quick transfer to the Space Station’s rodent lab for a study of how bone tissues regenerate in the space environment. Other studies delivered by Dragon look at methods of preparing stem cells for use in medical treatments, protein crystal growth in microgravity and viral mutations in the space environment.

 

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ISS Rodent Habitat – Image: NASA

 

much more at the link...

http://spaceflight101.com/dragon-spx-10-cargo-craft-arrives-at-iss/

 

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NanoRacks’ Research Platform Outside of International Space Station Ready to Host New Research

 

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February 23, 2017, Houston, TX — Early this morning, SpaceX’s Dragon successfully berthed to the International Space Station, carrying the next payload, Thermo Fisher Scientific’s “CID,” for the NanoRacks External Platform (NREP). The NREP is a permanent addition to the International Space Station, mounted each mission on the outside of the Space Station on the Japanese Exposed Facility.

 

CID is studying a specific type of modern camera called a “charge-injection device” (CID), which measures light from individual pixels, which enables pictures of scenes with extremely bright and extremely faint objects. This mission will study the feasibility in space, paving the way for their use in studying planets orbiting around distant stars.

 

CID was sponsored by the Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS). CASIS, which manages the U.S. National Lab on the International Space Station, is chartered with facilitating microgravity research with the potential to generates benefits to life on Earth

 

The self-funded NanoRacks External Platform is the first-ever commercial service – including return—to the extreme environment of space. NREP payloads follow the CubeSat form factor—customers experience the microgravity, radiation and other harsh elements native to the space environment, observe earth, test sensors, materials, and electronics, all while having the opportunity to return the payload back to Earth.

 

“We’ve got six months of non-stop operations ahead of us,” says NanoRacks Operations Manager Keith Tran. “We’re excited to see how CID reacts to the extreme space environment and to continue testing the full capabilities of NREP. Thank you to our friends at Thermo Fisher Scientific and CASIS for working with us on this program and for choosing our External Platform to conduct their research.“

http://nanoracks.com/nanoracks-research-platform-outside-international-space-station-new-research/

 

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Hangzhou Bay, China February 11, 2017

 

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Manufacturing plants and industrial ponds outside of Ningbo extend into the mud flats of Hangzhou Bay. The area is known as the Ningbo Hangzhou Bay New Zone—an economic development zone established by the local government in 2001.  Planet.com

 

https://www.planet.com/gallery/qiantang-river-20170212/

 

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ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/23/2017

 

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SpaceX (SpX)-10 Capture: After yesterday’s aborted rendezvous, a successful re-rendezvous and capture was performed this morning. The crew monitored the SpaceX-10 Dragon approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation (RWS) Dragon vehicle was captured using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) at 04:44 am CST today. Robotics Ground Controllers then used the SSRMS to maneuver the Dragon to and install it on the Node-2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). This afternoon, the crew performed vestibule outfitting, CBM Control Panel Assembly (CPA) removal, and ingressed the vehicle. After ingress, the crew removed the Center Stack then retrieved and unpacked the Dragon Cargo Transfer Bag (CTB) and Double Coldbags. The Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL) CO2 Incubator Installation and the Merlin Hardware Setup were done in preparation for Microgravity Extended Stem Cells (MESC) operations scheduled for early tomorrow. Installation of TangoLab Card Cube Replace, NanoRacks Mod9 Ops, Low Temperature (LT) Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Sample Preparation and NanoRacks Module-71 were also performed.

 

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew retrieved the NanoRacks Module-9 from SpX-10 and activated five tubes of Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP)/National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) experiments. Supporting various schools and student designed experiments studying a range of objectives, the SSEP lets students design experiments that address real challenges of living and working in space. The program also is a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, educating and inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program. Additionally, findings from student experiments such as those on bacteria growth, cell biology, food production and preservation, water quality, and seed and plant studies contribute to future experiments to benefit the space program. The following experiments were activated today:

The Effects of Microgravity on Muscle Tissue Regeneration (McNair Academic High School, Grade 12, Jersey City, NJ)
Shewanella oneidensis and Iron Ions in Microgravity (Bullis School, Grade 10, Potomac, MD)
The Effect of Microgravity on Preservation of Spam Using Lemon Juice (Lincoln Middle School, Grade 8, Santa Monica, CA)
Kidney Stone Conundrum (The Academy at Nola Dunn, Grade 5, Burleson, TX)
Microgravity’s Effects on the Turbidity of a Fluid Mixture of Cornstarch and Water (W.J. Keenan High School, Grade 9, Columbia, SC)


JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG): The crew removed the samples from the Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST) then initiated the crystal growth. The crew activated the three different crystal sample containers then returned them to the FROST to maintain the optimal growth temperature of 4 degrees Celsius. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to make high quality protein crystals under microgravity environmental conditions. Once growth is completed, the LT PCG experiment will be returned on SpX-10 for ground team evaluation and analysis. 

NanoRacks Module-71/Platform 1 Installation: The crew installed NanoRacks Module-71 into Platform 1.  Module-71 contains two plant growth experiments that will run onboard the ISS in the Platform-1 facility through the end of the SpX-10 mission.  Module-71 contains two plant growth experiments, NanoRacks-Valley Christian High School-BAM-FX– Enhanced Broccoli Seed Germination, Plant Growth and Zinc Biofortification on Orbit (NanoRacks-VCHS-BAM-FX) and NanoRacks-Edith Stein School-Vegetative Propagation of Plants in Orbit (V3PO), that aim to investigate the capability for production of large quantities of high quality vegetables on a space station. Results from the experiment will aid researchers in developing methods to provide astronauts a continuous supply of fresh vegetables on long missions. NanoRacks-VCHS-BAM-FX studies the growth of broccoli plants fortified with zinc, looking at seed germination and growth in microgravity, determining whether a bioavailable mineral nutrient formula will help plant growth.  The team responsible for V3PO is interested in vegetative plant propagation versus seeded propagation. In vegetative growth (cuttings) the desired characteristics are passed to subsequent generations of plants and ensures a uniform crop even when a few viable seeds are produced.

 

Payload Card-X: The crew retrieved the inserts from SpX-10 and installed them into the TangoLab facility. The inserts on Payload Card-X cover a wide spectrum of studies including:

Flatworms2.0: Follow up study to original flatworm regeneration study on SpX-5. Will include video and feeding capability.  
Smooth Muscle Cell Stimulus Response: Study of — cell line after cultured in microgravity for 4 days will be hit with reagent then acetone to video response.
Tissue Mimetic: Looking at diffusion rates of different molecular compounds in tissue proxy. Precursor to advanced tissue cultures.  
Methanogen Growth Characterization: Comparison of growth curves between Earth and microgravity of Methanogens.
Arabidopsis Study (Education): Arabidopsis study will be networked with real time control units in classrooms in San Francisco area of California. Precursor to larger undertaking with more schools on SpX-11 mission. 
Pharmaceutical Compound Generation:  Madagascar Periwinkle and Valeriana plants will be germinated on orbit to looking at mutation and generation of compounds used in synthesis of chemotherapies.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities are on schedule unless otherwise noted.

Configure for Dragon capture
Return to nominal configuration


Three-Day Look Ahead:

Friday, 02/24: 66P Dock, 66P ingress, 66P transfer operations, SABLE CO2 Incubator Install, TangoLab-1 card replace, MERLIN3 install, Polar 1 transfer and install, Glacier 3 transfer and install, MESC first microscope ops,
Saturday, 02/25: RR-4 transfer
Sunday, 02/26: Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC)

https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/02/23/iss-daily-summary-report-2232017/

 

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Space to Ground: Special Delivery for the Station: 02/24/2017

video is 2:27 min.

 

 

 

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Russian Cargo Craft Docks 24 Hours After Dragon Arrives

 

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Traveling about 250 miles over the south Pacific, the unpiloted Progress 66 Russian cargo ship docked at 3:30 a.m. EST to the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/24/russian-cargo-craft-docks-24-hours-after-dragon-arrives/

 

 

C5dNJQ_U4AAH8LH.jpg

Today’s arrival of the Progress 66 cargo craft, just 24 hours after the capture ofthe Space X Dragon, makes four spaceships at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

 

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Russian freighter links up with International Space Station

 

prog_ms05_docking.png

The Progress MS-05 supply ship is seen on final approach to the space station Friday. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

 

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Friday’s docking came less than a day after a commercial SpaceX-owned Dragon supply ship arrived at the space station, pulling within range of the research lab’s robotic arm for capture and berthing to the Harmony module on the U.S. section of the complex.

 

The Russian Progress spacecraft docked with the Earth-facing Pirs module on the Russian segment, where it is slated to remain until mid-June, when it will depart and burn up in Earth’s atmosphere to dispose of the space station’s trash, making way for the next logistics mission.

 

“At both ends of the International Space Station throughout the day on Friday, the crew members of Expedition 50 will be unloading cargo from two different vehicles that arrived just 24 hours apart to culminate one of the busiest weeks in the history of the International Space Station,” said Rob Navias, NASA TV’s commentator for Friday’s Progress docking.

 

The Progress MS-05 mission, known as Progress 66P in the space station’s visiting vehicle manifest, carried around 5,820 pounds, or 2,640 kilograms, of cargo and propellant to replenish stocks on the space station.

 

About 2,903 pounds (1,317 kilograms) of the material is dry cargo — spare parts, food, clothing and experiments — and another 1,940 pounds (880 kilograms) is propellant. The mission also delivered 926 pounds (420 kilograms) of fresh water and about 51 pounds (23 kilograms) of oxygen, according to NASA.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/24/progress-ms05-docking/

 

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Progress Resupply Craft pulls into Port at ISS after flawless Rendezvous

 

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Aboard Progress MS-05 is the first of the improved Orlan-MKS space suits to reach the Space Station after the first flight unit was lost in the MS-04 failure. Orlan-MKS has been designed to be more robust than their predecessors while being much easier to use and operate, cutting time from the typical preparations flow for each spacewalk carried out on ISS.

 

The suit has been built for up to 20 uses over a service life of six to seven years, capable of supporting extended spacewalks of up to nine hours. Changes to the older suits include the introduction of an automated thermal control system, a suit management computer that controls the temperature & monitors the suit’s life support functions, and a new, more durable material in the suit’s protective outer layers.

 

Progress MS-05 is set for a four-month stay at Pirs, its departure is currently penciled in for July 13 to make room for the MS-06 spacecraft that is scheduled to blast off from Baikonur one day later if the manifest remains as it stands today.

http://spaceflight101.com/progress-ms-05-arrives-at-space-station/

 

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Russia’s Orlan Space Suit – Photo: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

 

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ISS Progress 66 / Progress MS-05 docking

video is 4:11 min.

 

 

 

The KURS worked great. The station keeping was waived and she was brought straight in.

 

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Photo Moors "space truck" # ProgressMS05 by cosmonaut Andrei Borisenko. # MKSfotoDnya

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 27 February 2017

 

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The Expedition 50 crew began activating new science experiments delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon. The various life science studies will study bones and muscles, stem cells, botany and protein crystals.

 

Rodents delivered aboard Dragon were placed in their habitats over the weekend for the Rodent Research-4 study. That experiment is observing how bone and tissue regenerate in microgravity.

 

Stem cells were also unloaded from Dragon and stowed in a science freezer. The crew will research the replication of stem cells which may benefit clinical trials on Earth for new disease treatments. Astronaut Peggy Whitson used a specialized microscope to view the stem cells as the experiment got under way over the weekend.

 

The crew is also exploring how plants grow in space in order to provide food and oxygen for future long-duration missions. Plant samples were removed from a science freezer and placed in the Veggie facility for growth and observation. The spaceflight environment can change a plant's genetic expression and growth pattern.

 

High-quality crystals are being grown on the International Space Station that otherwise couldn't be grown on Earth due to gravity. The crystal samples are being studied for the Light Microscopy Module Biophysics-1 experiment to help researchers design new disease-fighting drugs.

 

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Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Sunday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers unstowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF). They then maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM to a translate configuration and translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite #6 (WS6) to WS7. Since they were ahead of schedule, the Robotics Ground Controllers also performed part of today's operations, maneuvering the SSRMS and SPDM as required to use SPDM Arm1 to remove the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) from EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistics Carrier 1 (ELC1). MSS performance was nominal. Monday night Robotic Ground Controllers will extract OPALS from ELC-1 Site 8 and install on SPDM EOTP Side 2.

 

Treadmill (T)2 Maintenance: The crew completed the 6-month T2 inspection. During this task the crew inspected the treadbelt slats and screws, cleaned the treadmill drive shaft, greased forward and rear axles, vacuumed inside the rack and around the treadmill, and inspected the bungee shackle key mount witness mark. This is nominal periodic corrective maintenance. Following the inspection, there was a checkout session prior to authorizing T2 for nominal use.

 

Dragon Cargo Operations: Crew completed unloading the Dragon vehicle on Saturday. Instructions for loading cargo for return will be uplinked to the crew later this week.

 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Maintenance: Today the crew reviewed procedures and gathered some of the necessary tools and materials to perform a week's worth of CDRA maintenance. Over the next three days the crew will remove the old beds from Lab CDRA and replace them with the newer generation beds, like those in Node 3 CDRA. This involves removing Lab CDRA from the LAB1D6 Air Revitalization (AR) Rack, disassembling it by removing all of the valves and ducting to access the beds, R&Ring the beds, reassembling CDRA, and reinstalling it in the Rack.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Battery 1A1 Capacity Test
SSRMS Walkoff
SPDM Unstow
MT Translation

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 02/28: CDRA R&R, Biolab Rotor A Repair, MESC, CDRA R&R
Wednesday, 03/01: CDRA R&R, FROST-2, J-Microbe Install, J-Lan Monitor Install, EVA Tether Inspect
Thursday, 03/02: CDRA R&R, EVA Loop Scrub/H2O Conductivity Test, EMU Swap, PM3 H/W Gather, N3 Endcone Cleanout

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - On
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - Off
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Standby
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-27-february-2017.html

 

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NASA Space Station On-Orbit Status 28 February 2017

 

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Astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Peggy Whitson set up the Microgravity Science Glovebox inside the Destiny lab module. Credit: NASA.

 

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Astronaut Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency cleaned U.S. spacesuit cooling loops and collected water samples for a periodic maintenance check today. Afterward, he began charging spacewalking gear including helmet lights and tool batteries.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson worked on life support maintenance today. They removed and disassembled valves and ducts to access old carbon dioxide filters that needed replacing inside the Destiny lab module. The duo will be back at work Wednesday installing newer generation filters.

 

One of the main objectives of the International Space Station is to provide an orbital laboratory to research how living in space long-term affects humans. New and ongoing experiments conducted today may provide benefits for humans on and off Earth.

 

Kimbrough checked on rodents being observed for a tissue regeneration study. Whitson continued researching stem cells with a new microscope delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon. Cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko studied how viruses behave in space while his fellow cosmonauts, Sergey Ryzhikov and Oleg Novitskiy, explored non-invasive ways to monitor a crew member's health and methods to keep their skills sharp on and off Earth.

 

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Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) Microscope Operations: The crew removed a BioCell from the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory-2 (SABL2) and placed it on the microscope stage configured outside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The crew worked with ground specialist to image areas of the BioCell plate. Following the focused imaging, the crew reinserted the BioCell back into the SABL. MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to stow the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) on the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP). They then handed the Space Test Program - Houston 5 (STP-H5) payload from SPDM Arm 2 to Arm 1. This was done to switch from having Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 2 (OTCM2) providing keep alive power to the STP-H5 to having OTCM1 grasping the STP-H5 Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) so that the STP-H5 could be installed on EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistics Carrier 1 (ELC1). After the STP-H5 had been installed, the SSRMS and SPDM were maneuvered to a Mobile Transporter (MT) translation configuration. MSS performance was nominal.

 

Space Test Program - Houston 5 (STP-H5) Activation: The STP-H5 payload was installed on ELC-1 and successfully activated, one day earlier than originally planned. Initial data indicates that the STP-H5 equipment is healthy. Activation of individual experiment packages is ongoing. STP-H5 is an EXpedite PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Pallet Adapter Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (ExPA-FRAM) based payload consisting of 13 individual experiments ranging from technology demonstrations to space and terrestrial weather measuring and monitoring. The experiments are provided and operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA agencies.

 

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Ground Activities
All activities were completed unless otherwise noted.
Capacity Test for Battery 1A2
MT Translation from WS7 to WS6

 

Three-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 03/01: CDRA R&R, FROST-2, J-Microbe Install, J-Lan Monitor Install, EVA Tether Inspect
Thursday, 03/02: CDRA R&R, EVA Loop Scrub/H2O Conductivity Test, EMU Swap, PM3 H/W Gather, N3 Endcone Cleanout
Friday, 03/038: Node 2 Power Cable (HMU 220) Rerouting, PMA3 Ingress, ESA Energy, Node 3 IMV Valve Scavenge

 

QUICK ISS Status - Environmental Control Group:
Component - Status
Elektron - On
Vozdukh - Manual
[СКВ] 1 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV1") - Off 
[СКВ] 2 - SM Air Conditioner System ("SKV2") - On
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Lab - Standby
Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Node 3 - Operate
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Lab - Startup
Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Node 3 - Operate
Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) - Process
Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) - Standby
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Lab - Off
Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) Node 3 - Full Up

http://spaceref.com/international-space-station/nasa-space-station-on-orbit-status-28-february-2017.html

 

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Station Boosting Orbit for April Crew Swap

 

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The International Space Station will boost its orbit Wednesday night to get ready for a crew swap next month. Three Expedition 50 crew members will complete their mission and a new two-person crew will launch to the station in April.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and his crewmates Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko will end their mission April 10 after 173 days in space. The trio will undock from the Poisk mini-research module in their Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft officially ending the Expedition 50 mission.

 

The reboost also readies the station for the arrival of two new crew members who will arrive April 20. Veteran cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and NASA astronaut Jack Fischer, a first-time space flyer, will take a short four-orbit ride aboard the Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft and dock to Poisk. The new Expedition 51 trio is scheduled to stay in space for 136 days.

 

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson will become Expedition 51 commander after Kimbrough and his crew undock. She is staying behind with fellow crewmates Thomas Pesquet from France and Oleg Novitskiy from Russia. They will stay in space until June 2 ending their mission after 195 days when they return home in their Soyuz MS-03 spacecraft.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/03/01/station-boosting-orbit-for-april-crew-swap/

 

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Brand New Dragon Experiments Activated on Station

 

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The Expedition 50 crew began activating new science experiments delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon. The various life science studies will study bones and muscles, stem cells, botany and protein crystals.

 

Rodents delivered aboard Dragon were placed in their habitats over the weekend for the Rodent Research-4 study. That experiment is observing how bone and tissue regenerate in microgravity.

 

Stem cells were also unloaded from Dragon and stowed in a science freezer. The crew will research the replication of stem cells which may benefit clinical trials on Earth for new disease treatments. Astronaut Peggy Whitson used a specialized microscope to view the stem cells as the experiment got under way over the weekend.

 

The crew is also exploring how plants grow in space in order to provide food and oxygen for future long-duration missions. Plant samples were removed from a science freezer and placed in the Veggie facility for growth and observation. The spaceflight environment can change a plant’s genetic expression and growth pattern.

 

High-quality crystals are being grown on the International Space Station that otherwise couldn’t be grown on Earth due to gravity. The crystal samples are being studied for the Light Microscopy Module Biophysics-1 experiment to help researchers design new disease-fighting drugs.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/27/brand-new-dragon-experiments-activated-on-station/

 

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Crew Checks Spacesuits and Explores New Life Science

 

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Astronaut Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency cleaned U.S. spacesuit cooling loops and collected water samples for a periodic maintenance check today. Afterward, he began charging spacewalking gear including helmet lights and tool batteries.

 

Commander Shane Kimbrough and NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson worked on life support maintenance today. They removed and disassembled valves and ducts to access old carbon dioxide filters that needed replacing inside the Destiny lab module. The duo will be back at work Wednesday installing newer generation filters.

 

One of the main objectives of the International Space Station is to provide an orbital laboratory to research how living in space long-term affects humans. New and ongoing experiments conducted today may provide benefits for humans on and off Earth.

 

Kimbrough checked on rodents being observed for a tissue regeneration study. Whitson continued researching stem cells with a new microscope delivered last week aboard the SpaceX Dragon. Cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko studied how viruses behave in space while his fellow cosmonauts, Sergey Ryzhikov and Oleg Novitskiy, explored non-invasive ways to monitor a crew member’s health and methods to keep their skills sharp on and off Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/02/28/crew-checks-spacesuits-and-explores-new-life-science/

 

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VEGGIE: Growing Lettuce in Space

 

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VEGGIE   NASA/ESA

 

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Thomas Pesquet I don't have a green thumb, but I know someone who does! Peggy was growing lettuce in Columbus for the VEGGIE experiment. 
One of the best parts is... we get to eat the result. Growing food in space is a huge step forward for exploration. It might not seem like much, but think about it... how do you water a plant when water floats? Also how do plants know which way is up, where do there roots grow and where the leaves? These fundamental problems are overcome and we can now say: as human beings we can grow food in space offering fresh and potentially sustainable food for long mission to far away places.

http://spaceref.com/space-biology/veggie-growing-lettuce-in-space.html

 

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Aswan Dam Seen From Orbit

 

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Aswan Dam  NASA/ESA

 

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Thomas Pesquet: The Aswan dam: a site that is practically.. pharaonic ;)

http://spaceref.com/earth/aswan-dam-seen-from-orbit.html

 

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Cape of Good Hope Seen From Orbit

 

oo32475127861.jpg

Cape of Good  ESA/NASA

 

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Thomas Pesquet: The Cape of Good Hope, aptly named, one of Africa's most southern points! Crossing it with a space station is certainly not comparable to doing so sailing

http://spaceref.com/earth/cape-of-good-hope-seen-from-orbit.html

 

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Getting Ready To Capture a Dragon In Space

 

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Cupola   NASA

 

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The robotics workstation inside the station's Cupola module is seen prior to the robotic capture of SpaceX's Dragon cargo craft.
The commercial spacecraft launched on Feb. 19 and carried about 5,500 pounds of experiments and supplies to the orbiting laboratory. Expedition 50 crew members Thomas Pesquet and Shane Kimbrough used the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to capture Dragon, then handed command over to ground controllers to attach Dragon to the station.

http://spaceref.com/onorbit/getting-ready-to-capture-a-dragon-in-space.html

 

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:)

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