Recommend a modern DSLR/MILC camera up to £350?


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Elliot B.

I am looking for an entry-level replacement for my 2010 Nikon D3100.

 

I will not be keeping my lens, so I'll be buying a camera with an included standard lens.

 

I believe my options (correct me if I'm wrong) are:

  • Nikon D3300, Jan 2014, £275
  • Canon M10, Oct 2015, £290
  • Canon 1300D, Mar 2016, £330

Any thoughts?

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Draconian Guppy

If you don't mind me asking, why are you seeking to replace?   Its better to invest in decent glass than upgrade body for the lulz

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Elliot B.
3 hours ago, Draconian Guppy said:

If you don't mind me asking, why are you seeking to replace?   Its better to invest in decent glass than upgrade body for the lulz

The glass doesn't change the quality of the photos as much as the body's internals (the processor etc.).

 

Plus, the D3300 body handles hand-held flashless low-light photography better.

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Draconian Guppy
9 hours ago, Elliot B. said:

The glass doesn't change the quality of the photos as much as the body's internals (the processor etc.).

 

Plus, the D3300 body handles hand-held flashless low-light photography better.

Please, register an account at dpreview.com and go ahead post those exact sames words... :laugh:

 

jokes aside, quality of glass does matter, specially compared to kit lens that go to around f3.4 ish, whilst primes a nifty fifty will go down to 1.8 for your low light scenarios.

Have you shot with other lens other than kit lens?

 

 

http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_eos_1300d_review/conclusion/

Quote

But spec sheets aside, the Canon EOS 1300D is a decent all-round performer in the real world. Its sensor may date back to the dark ages, but it still produces acceptable image quality up to ISO 3200 and it’ll resolve plenty of detail with an 18-55mm kit lens. A 3fps shooting speed is hardly blistering, but this is a camera aimed at DSLR newcomers, not hard-core sports photographers, and for this market things like a leisurely burst shooting speed and basic autofocussing are unlikely to be deal-breakers. What’s more important is a simple and logical control layout that helps you get to grips with manual photography, and here the 1300D excels. Aside from the internal Wi-Fi, it’s the only area that’s superior to the D3300. Sure, the Nikon offers a prettier LCD readout and a guide mode, but when it gets down to the business of actually shooting, the 1300D is more intuitive to operate with dedicated ISO and white balance buttons that greatly enhance its usability.

 

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