Xbox Games with Gold & Deals with Gold: February 2017


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dipsylalapo
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For the month of February, Xbox Live Gold members will receive four new free games – two on Xbox One and two on Xbox 360 – as part of the Games with Gold program. You can play both Xbox 360 titles on your Xbox One with Backward Compatibility.

 

On Xbox One, Xbox Live Gold members can download Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime ($14.99 ERP) for free during the month of February. Project Cars Digital Edition ($29.99 ERP) will be available as a free download from February 16th to March 15th.

 

On Xbox 360, starting Wednesday, February 1st, Monkey Island 2: SE ($9.99 ERP) will be free for Xbox Live Gold members through February 15th. Then on February 16th, Xbox Live Gold Members can download Star Wars: The Force Unleashed ($19.99 ERP) for free through February 28th.

 

*Titles are available as free downloads for qualifying Xbox Live Gold members in all markets where Xbox Live is available. Some regions may offer different titles depending on market availability.

Source

 

EA Access Games in the Vault for Xbox One

Xbox One Backwards Compatibility Games

 

Xbox Games with Gold & Deals with Gold: January 2017

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Skiver

Urgh Project Cars... still to this day the worst game I have ever bought.

 

I'll get it to see if it's gotten any better but the game just played horribly.

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dipsylalapo
4 minutes ago, Skiver said:

Urgh Project Cars... still to this day the worst game I have ever bought.

 

I'll get it to see if it's gotten any better but the game just played horribly.

I was wondering about this, there was a lot of hype around this game but the release was a little rocky, but again for free, I'll try it out. 

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Andrew
1 hour ago, Skiver said:

Urgh Project Cars... still to this day the worst game I have ever bought.

 

I'll get it to see if it's gotten any better but the game just played horribly.

Really? I was tempted last week with an offer from ASDA or somewhere, but glad I held off if that's the case. I have read it's best to play with a wheel vs controller though.

 

The rest of the month is a wash out for me, but hoping Project Cars is somewhat redeemable..

 

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Skiver
On 24/01/2017 at 5:49 PM, Andrew said:

Really? I was tempted last week with an offer from ASDA or somewhere, but glad I held off if that's the case. I have read it's best to play with a wheel vs controller though.

 

The rest of the month is a wash out for me, but hoping Project Cars is somewhat redeemable..

 

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So keeping in mind this was when it first came out so things could be different now, however, the game just played massively inconsistently. My benchmark is Forza Motorsport which I've owned all but the first one, I know when something in that doesn't go to plan it's always my fault whereas there were times I'd hit a curb (perfectly normal) and I'd be fine and then other times I'd hit that same curb and somehow be facing backwards. I'd have snaps of oversteer that just never felt right. The game had this weird rubber banding effect every so often where it would drop frames and give the impression everything was slowing down to suddenly then catch up and felt like I was going 2 x the speed.

 

Graphically the game was beautiful but I found myself forcing myself to play it and trying to like it. I normally keep all games I buy, I don't trade them in etc but with this, I was back at Game within 3 days to return it I hated it so much.

I'll probably pick it up and give it another try, but if it's like it used to be, if I want to play a racer I'll pop FM6 back in.

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Vandalsquad

I played my mates copy of Cars when it first launched on PS4 and I'll follow up with Skiver, the gameplay and racing felt terrible to Forza hard to put my finger on exactly why but it just wasn't enjoyable? Maybe Forza has just spoiled us, I'm not sure it's been quite a few years since any other racer worthy of my time has come out. But not worth a play at launch at all, friend returned it within a few days.

 

If it's free I'll give it the 30 minutes to see if it's any better but eh... Would like to peoples thoughts jumping straight in now on it who haven't played before.

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Skiver

I gave Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime a go last night, that game is pretty damn fun to be honest. I'd have loved an online mode to play with friends but I still enjoyed it and can see me maybe playing with my daughter as something quite fun for us.

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George P
7 hours ago, Skiver said:

I gave Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime a go last night, that game is pretty damn fun to be honest. I'd have loved an online mode to play with friends but I still enjoyed it and can see me maybe playing with my daughter as something quite fun for us.

That's good to know,  I might check it out now since it's free as well. 

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Skiver
14 hours ago, George P said:

That's good to know,  I might check it out now since it's free as well. 

 

It's a difficult game to describe but it's essentially trying to manage a "spaceship" and it's systems but you can only use a system by being sat at it. So picture FTL (If you know it) but you don't have a shield unless you have someone sat in the shield room and there's only 2 of you (1 controllable AI) and there, from memory, around 8 systems to control so you can move and have a shield but no-one to shoot the enemies etc.

 

If you have one or more people (4 total) for couch co-op it could be great fun but single player is great too.

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dipsylalapo

This week's Deals with Gold and Spotlight sale. Discounts are valid now through to 13th  February. 

 

If you played Rainbow 6: Siege at the weekend and fancy picking up a copy it's 50% off this week. 

 

Source

 

EDIT - link has been updated with a few more titles. Deep Silver is now having a publisher sale. You're able to get both Metro games on the One for around £5. Massive bargain imo. 

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George P

Nice addition to the BC list, I have yet to play gta 4 and 5, they'll have to wait though.

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Skiver

So I decided I would give Projects Cars another go, hoping things would have improved since I last played. Maybe it's a combination of improvements or maybe it's because I can thankfully skip the Karting but I actually enjoyed it quite a bit. There are times the rookie formula cars feel a little floaty and unpredictable but then again I've never driven one so for all I know that's just how they handle. I stuck with it and learned the tracks I was racing on, I learnt that I can't just 100% throttle through corners as I'd expected and slowly I got better and started to enjoy it.

 

 

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dipsylalapo

This week's Deals with Gold and Spotlight sale. Discounts are valid now through to 27th February. 

 

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dipsylalapo

This week's Deals with Gold and Spotlight sale. Discounts are valid now through to 6th March. There's also a EA publisher sale on including BF1 and Titanfall2.

 

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dipsylalapo

Just on this, there is 67% off the BF1 and Titanfall bundle, so you can get deluxe versions of both games for just under £40....not a bad price to pay IMO.

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