• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

What OS for HPE ProLiant MicroServer Gen10

Recommended Posts

Class    10

Hi fellowians!

 

I've recently bought this small server, for home use. Question, is how to config it? Out of the box, it's recommended with HPE ClearOS which I don't know at all.

Can any1 recommend me a main OS that can VM/Container others? I know only one, which is vSphere Hypervisor.

USAGE would be mostly or better to say, mainly a VPN server for all other PCs and mobiles. 2ndery would be simply to store and backup data. I didn't buy HDD-s yet, but I'm looking into getting 4x3TB and in Raid10.

 

Thanks in advance for the tips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggis    991

If you want a full on Hypervisor tou could use ESXi

 

I have an older model. have had it for years and i always had debian on it and its been rock solid

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,173
On 2018-03-28 at 6:48 PM, Class said:

Hi fellowians!

 

I've recently bought this small server, for home use. Question, is how to config it? Out of the box, it's recommended with HPE ClearOS which I don't know at all.

Can any1 recommend me a main OS that can VM/Container others? I know only one, which is vSphere Hypervisor.

USAGE would be mostly or better to say, mainly a VPN server for all other PCs and mobiles. 2ndery would be simply to store and backup data. I didn't buy HDD-s yet, but I'm looking into getting 4x3TB and in Raid10.

 

Thanks in advance for the tips.

You appear to want a very simple home server computer for which VMs are not needed for anything.

 

If you have an interest or need for VM tech, then ideally you want a Hypervisor.

 

ESXi is a bare metal Hypervisor I think, so you need to check their supported hardware page very carefully.

 

Most recent versions of Linux have the standard Linux Hypervisor built into the kernel. You need to make some manual configs if you want to have Hypervisors embedded inside Hypervisors known as "Nested VM"

 

Windows 10 Pro includes the Hyper-V Hypervisor which supports Nested VMs out of the box but is still known to be cranky with GPU virtualization. Hyper-V is probably the most advanced Hypervisor due to extremely clever integration with Windows 10 but this mainly benefits personal usage by developers and I.T. and for server usage I don't think it is any better or worse than other options.

 

That's the Big 3 Hypervisor list but there are a few specialized ones including direct Docker  Container Virtualization and also Bare Metal Kubernetes.

 

For Linux, Ubuntu has guest support for Hyper-V built right into the ISO download, otherwise RHEL, Fedora, CentOS (same base) are popular for server/hypervisor use at a I.T./enterprise level so lots of support will be available.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
InsaneNutter    1,054

I use ESXi on my home server and have a pfSense VM as firewall / VPN.

 

I also run a game server open to the internet, which is on its own VLAN and has no access at all to my home network.

 

For storage I actually just run a Windows 10 VM with a SATA controller passed though to it and have setup various network shares. You can use Stable Bit Drive Pool to pool multiple drives together and offer redundancy for selected folders if desired.

 

The way I see it is raid is not a backup solution, its a high ability solution for data you always want to be online. If any data on your raid array gets corrupted you will be restoring from a backup anyway. If anything goes wrong with that array its going to be more trouble than its worth for a home server, which is why i don't use raid at home. I kept is simple and ensure I have multiple backups not on my home server of any important data.

 

I'd also agree with DevTech, Hyper-V on Windows 10 is pretty nice too. You could run Windows 10 as your main os to share files, run Plex if you have a photo / media library, then have a VM running OpenVPN Access Server for a nice easy to manage VPN.

 

It really depends what you want to get out of setting this up. When i set my home server up I wanted to gain some experience with ESXi, which I was later able to put to use in my day job.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Class    10
Posted (edited)

Finally, I have time to reflect on this one. 😎

 

Btw, here is a rig description if for some reason it wasn't clear from the name:

Quote

HPE ProLiant MicroServer Gen10 Server

AMD Opteron X3216

8GB-U DDR4

4* 3TB Toshiba SATA3

 

Found a decent article on this topic also here: http://www.virten.net/2017/11/homeserver-esxi-on-hpe-proliant-microserver-gen10/

 

Got all the hardware. Bought 4 cheap HDDs and it's almost sure I will run them in RAID 5/6 or maybe even 10.

 

Software, I'm still unsure what I will pick as "main OS" - in general I'm an experimental type of guy, but also don't like to constantly change and reinstall everything. So I want to have a base that allows me to setup "sandboxes".

 

At the moment, I'm thinking of ESXi, because it's free. Currently checked on HPE site, and officially it's not on the compatibility list, but users have confirmed it works out of box with stuck ESXi and also the customer HPE image.

 

Last week I had the idea to go for Windows Server Essentials. Anybody any experiences with that?

Edited by Class

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,173
3 hours ago, Class said:

Finally, I have time to reflect on this one. 😎

 

Btw, here is a rig description if for some reason it wasn't clear from the name:

Found a decent article on this topic also here: http://www.virten.net/2017/11/homeserver-esxi-on-hpe-proliant-microserver-gen10/

 

Got all the hardware. Bought 4 cheap HDDs and it's almost sure I will run them in RAID 5/6 or maybe even 10.

 

Software, I'm still unsure what I will pick as "main OS" - in general I'm an experimental type of guy, but also don't like to constantly change and reinstall everything. So I want to have a base that allows me to setup "sandboxes".

 

At the moment, I'm thinking of ESXi, because it's free. Currently checked on HPE site, and officially it's not on the compatibility list, but users have confirmed it works out of box with stuck ESXi and also the customer HPE image.

 

Last week I had the idea to go for Windows Server Essentials. Anybody any experiences with that?

It is really really hard for people over the internet without a Telepathy Mod to provide insight and help if you don't provide detailed information about your objectives.

 

So far you have given no usage scenarios that would indicate a need to set up and maintain a server box instead of just getting a NAS box.

 

ESXI makes ZERO sense unless you need something that ESXI does.

 

Anything based on a Windows 10 kernel such as Windows Server 2016 will be fine and any modern Linux such as Ubuntu or CentOS/Fedora will be fine for server stuff and VM hosting provided you have some server type requirement.

 

In 2018, all real servers are based on Scalable Clusters that deploy Docker Containerized applications via Google Kubernetes orchestration. So don't think VM, think Container!

 

Here is an easy way to get a quick overview on how modern server infrastructure works:

 

https://bitnami.com/kubernetes

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shockz    3,539
Posted (edited)
On 5/14/2018 at 10:43 AM, DevTech said:

It is really really hard for people over the internet without a Telepathy Mod to provide insight and help if you don't provide detailed information about your objectives.

 

So far you have given no usage scenarios that would indicate a need to set up and maintain a server box instead of just getting a NAS box.

 

ESXI makes ZERO sense unless you need something that ESXI does.

 

Anything based on a Windows 10 kernel such as Windows Server 2016 will be fine and any modern Linux such as Ubuntu or CentOS/Fedora will be fine for server stuff and VM hosting provided you have some server type requirement.

 

In 2018, all real servers are based on Scalable Clusters that deploy Docker Containerized applications via Google Kubernetes orchestration. So don't think VM, think Container!

 

Here is an easy way to get a quick overview on how modern server infrastructure works:

 

https://bitnami.com/kubernetes

 

 

Not sure why you're anti-esx for his needs? Not sure either, why you're making it sound as if ESXi requires some sort of complex deploymentIn fact, ESXi would probably be my go to for his needs, as it provides the flexibility of extending that system to meet additional needs that would be easy to build out, and not limited to just that particular Windows OS.. If anything he should be deploying that Windows 10/2016 OS as a VM.  

 

I've been experimenting with containers as well, not to mention have pfSense as my firewall/router, a web server, my wifi controller, FreeNAS, vpn, several Windows VMs, all running on a $300 Intel NUC with ESXi. I'd feel extremely limited if I dedicated that entire system to a Windows system. 

 

Honestly can think of anything HyperV does better over ESXi. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,173
44 minutes ago, shockz said:

Not sure why you're anti-esx for his needs? Not sure either, why you're making it sound as if ESXi requires some sort of complex deploymentIn fact, ESXi would probably be my go to for his needs, as it provides the flexibility of extending that system to meet additional needs that would be easy to build out, and not limited to just that particular Windows OS.. If anything he should be deploying that Windows 10/2016 OS as a VM.  

 

I've been experimenting with containers as well, not to mention have pfSense as my firewall/router, a web server, my wifi controller, FreeNAS, vpn, several Windows VMs, all running on a $300 Intel NUC with ESXi. I'd feel extremely limited if I dedicated that entire system to a Windows system. 

 

Honestly can think of anything HyperV does better over ESXi. 

WARNING: Ignore this long post about modern server technology as pure geek-aholic. The OP probably just needs FreeNAS or similar to simulate the NAS box he didn't buy. Since the main reason most people buy a server instead of a NAS box is to Learn Something, the following material covers that possible usage:

 

It is entirely possible that ESXI is the best match for his needs. We just don't know because his needs are not well articulated. Every need that has been mentioned so far would be covered by a tiny NAS device.

 

ESXI has a limited range of hardware support compared to Linux or Windows. Deployment is easy if you use supported hardware and you know why you are deploying on ESXi

 

If you want to talk about VMs and in this case, no case has been made for needing  even a single VM then as you point out, any of the mentioned OS can be a HOST for other VMs - Since he is not deploying a server farm, there is no need to consider differences in performance which  these days is  not noticable but instead focus on convenience. Either Windows with Hyper-V or Linux is simply more convenient as a starting point unless you want to experience the nuts and bolts of ESXi. In any case, as long as each Hypervisor is configured to support "Nested VM" then you can run Hypervisors inside other Hypervisors making your starting point at least for learning purposes, anything you want.

 

So we are blowing up a need for a NAS device into a complexity level that would make Rube Goldberg quite happy. Lets spin-up VMs everywhere for all the simple functions that NAS devices perform just because we can!

 

So, I started talking about containers and stuff because the only conceivable reason I could think of for VMs on a tiny 8 gig RAM footprint was Learning. And modern VM tech is focused on efficient container deployment across clusters and to some extent for development and learning purposes, a cluster farm can be simulated on a single box with some VMs - One could start with MiniKube or use the included infrastructure in the latest Docker for Windows which uses Hyper-V and includes Kubernetes.

 

https://kubernetes.io/docs/getting-started-guides/minikube/

 

https://docs.docker.com/docker-for-windows/kubernetes/

 

Download for Edge version of Docker that includes Kubernetes, install on any Hyper-V capable Windows computer:

 

https://download.docker.com/win/edge/Docker for Windows Installer.exe

 

"Kubernetes is only available in Docker for Windows 18.02 CE Edge. Kubernetes support is not included in Docker for Windows 18.02 CE Stable. To find out more about Stable and Edge channels and how to switch between them, see General configuration.

Docker for Windows 18.02 CE Edge includes a standalone Kubernetes server and client, as well as Docker CLI integration. The Kubernetes server runs locally within your Docker instance, is not configurable, and is a single-node cluster.

The Kubernetes server runs within a Docker container on your local system, and is only for local testing. When Kubernetes support is enabled, you can deploy your workloads, in parallel, on Kubernetes, Swarm, and as standalone containers. Enabling or disabling the Kubernetes server does not affect your other workloads.

 

See Docker for Windows > Getting started to enable Kubernetes and begin testing the deployment of your workloads on Kubernetes."

 

(Native support for Docker Containers is built into Windows 10 and Windows Server)

 

-----------------------------------------

NOTE TO READERS:

 

For anyone passing by and going WTF, Google uses Kubernetes to deploy Everything to containers on Billions of servers. They donated this infrastructure to the OSS community and it is now humantitie's defacto standard for deploying applications to servers and hence it is the first thing somebody would want to learn if they want to play with modern server deployment.

 

Every major computing company in the industry has come together around this standard and have formed the umbrella organization CNCF - Cloud Native Computing Foundation (The word Cloud can be confusing as it all applies to local servers as well)

 

https://www.cncf.io/

 

https://github.com/cncf/landscape

 

CloudNativeLandscape_latest.thumb.png.bf17c9da1f527c6eab4ad5aff52eafa4.png

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.