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Which Linux for a newbie who doesn't like change ... coming from Windows (7)?

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adrynalyne    10,897
1 minute ago, Mindovermaster said:

Most OLD stuff has drivers installed. I'm talking onboard, not like your GPU...

Woosh. 

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Mindovermaster    1,674
5 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Woosh. 

You don't believe me?

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Brandon H    2,520
1 minute ago, Mindovermaster said:

You don't believe me?

pretty sure it was a joke about how you used to have to manually install most drivers :rofl::p 

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Mindovermaster    1,674
1 minute ago, Brandon H said:

pretty sure it was a joke about how you used to have to manually install most drivers :rofl::p 

Yeah, but he sounded sarcastic...

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adrynalyne    10,897
3 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Yeah, but he sounded sarcastic...

Typed words have no sound, just sayin. 😉

6 minutes ago, Brandon H said:

pretty sure it was a joke about how you used to have to manually install most drivers :rofl::p 

Yes thank you LOL. The good ol’ days; don’t miss em one bit. 

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Somnus    19

I moved from Windows to Linux on all the computers at home using Mint and love it. My children use it daily and have no issues because all their school work is done on Google Docs. It's how the school does things here.

 

What I like about it is the community forums have all the fixes I've ever looked for. Other than a single wireless adapter that has issues (ASUS USB-AC 53 Nano), setup was a breeze. My son's who live on their own use Mint as well, but they also game on their systems and have no issues. Steam is a great platform.

 

I liked Ubuntu, but I love Mint w/ Cinnamon.

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Brandon H    2,520
5 minutes ago, Somnus said:

I moved from Windows to Linux on all the computers at home using Mint and love it. My children use it daily and have no issues because all their school work is done on Google Docs. It's how the school does things here.

Heck even if their school used MS Office like everyone else, Mint has Libre Office which is able to use the .docx format just as well as MS Office :)

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Somnus    19
2 minutes ago, Brandon H said:

Heck even if their school used MS Office like everyone else, Mint has Libre Office which is able to use the .docx format just as well as MS Office :)

All the kids use Chromebooks at school this year, where last year was a tablet. The Google Apps they use are more than sufficient for what they need and is the expected platform to do home work with. They do take their Chromebooks between school and home. My Daughter is only in Grade 6 and goes to a STEM school.

If there are times the internet goes out, she uses Libre Office on her desktop in her room and puts it on a flash drive.

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adrynalyne    10,897
3 minutes ago, Jazmac said:

I would give Elementary Linux a look. Its donation based but 10 bucks for developers won't break the bank.

https://elementary.io

Almost all distros are. That said, you don’t have to if you don’t want to. 

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Jazmac    2,266
1 minute ago, adrynalyne said:

Almost all distros are. That said, you don’t have to if you don’t want to. 

This one you can't get without donation, I don't believe.  ( Of course, I could be wrong )  :)

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Mindovermaster    1,674
3 minutes ago, Jazmac said:

This one you can't get without donation, I don't believe.  ( Of course, I could be wrong )  :)

There are other ways to get it, you know. :rolleyes:

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adrynalyne    10,897
6 minutes ago, Jazmac said:

This one you can't get without donation, I don't believe.  ( Of course, I could be wrong )  :)

Enter a ‘0’ for donation to expose download link. 

2 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

There are other ways to get it, you know. :rolleyes:

There is no need to, you know. 🙄

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xMorpheousx416    26
Quote

 

1) If installing to a new drive, what capacity would you give it for a Linux install?

 

 

USB at least 8GB.
HDD, well, anything larger than 8GB!

 

Quote

2) If triple booting (since i'll have 2x Windows 7 installs plus a Linux install) then what order would you install in?

If you're starting fresh, install Windows first.  Use the drive partition manager during Windows install to delete all partitions leaving the drive "blank".  Create two partitions for Windows, but then leave the blank space for Linux.  You do not need to partition at this time, Linux will do that for you, and it's easier for the installer to create/format the partition if it's blank, rather than FAT32 or NTFS.
Install Windows on partition 1, then your dual boot to partition 2, then Linux.  

Quote

 

3) Here's a question ... can you stop the drive that Linux is installed on from 'seeing' other drives?

For example, Disk Management in Windows, enter that & remove the drive letters for the drives you don't want your 'C' drive to 'see' and that's it job done. Can you do something like this in Linux so that it can only 'see' itself and not the Windows drives?

 

I've never done this, but if it's possible, someone else will have that answer.  

 

Quote

I'm just wondering how you’d connect to the internet etc? With the virtual machine I’m guessing it picks up your connection from the host? You’d have no such thing on a clean install on its own drive. 

The host OS controls everything using drivers installed within.  VM machines use those drivers, so yes, the guest OS will use the host's internet connection.

 

Quote

With Windows you have to install your motherboard drivers and then you can connect to the internet. I’m guessing the same drivers can’t be used on a Linux setup?

No.  For a clean install of Linux, you'll have to use Linux drivers for the system. (all hardware - GPU, sound, internet, etc)

 

Quote

My motherboard is also quite old, at least 10 years. So basically just wondering how i’d do it? 

If you're using a virtual machine, just set up said VM, and install Linux.  The host OS (Windows in this case) will take care of all that for you.

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Jazmac    2,266
22 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Enter a ‘0’ for donation to expose download link. 

There is no need to, you know. 🙄

My conscious would bug me so I'll just drop the 10 beans on it. Won't hurt me but good to know.

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Technique    34
4 hours ago, xMorpheousx416 said:

If you're using a virtual machine, just set up said VM, and install Linux.  The host OS (Windows in this case) will take care of all that for you.

Thanks for the reply.

 

Though that last part - i'm ideally wanting a fresh install as i don't like the laggy nature of the Virtual Machine. I've had a look at the ASUS website and while there are drivers for the LAN side of the motherboard, there was no mention of sound drivers.

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Brandon H    2,520
35 minutes ago, Technique said:

Thanks for the reply.

 

Though that last part - i'm ideally wanting a fresh install as i don't like the laggy nature of the Virtual Machine. I've had a look at the ASUS website and while there are drivers for the LAN side of the motherboard, there was no mention of sound drivers.

most linux distros will just work out of the box now a days; rarely will you ever need to install a driver manually on a major distro unless your board is either brand new or damned ancient :)

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Mindovermaster    1,674
13 minutes ago, Brandon H said:

most linux distros will just work out of the box now a days; rarely will you ever need to install a driver manually on a major distro unless your board is either brand new or damned ancient :)

You might have to download drivers for your GPU, but that is an easy install. just an easy apt-get away. :yes:

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Technique    34

Yeah I went on Nvidia’s website last night and got the driver. 

 

How do I install Linux on a drive that’s already in use?

 

i have a 2TB drive that I currently use to dump files on from within Windows. Videos, pictures, documents etc but there’s plenty of space left over that I could spare for a Linux install - I just don’t want to lose the Windows files obviously. 

 

I was thinking of partitioning off say 200GB to give this thing a real try to see if I like it. Just how would I do it?

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adrynalyne    10,897
7 minutes ago, Technique said:

Yeah I went on Nvidia’s website last night and got the driver. 

 

How do I install Linux on a drive that’s already in use?

 

i have a 2TB drive that I currently use to dump files on from within Windows. Videos, pictures, documents etc but there’s plenty of space left over that I could spare for a Linux install - I just don’t want to lose the Windows files obviously. 

 

I was thinking of partitioning off say 200GB to give this thing a real try to see if I like it. Just how would I do it?

Disregard the gpu drivers, that’s not going to be for a beginner. Use the out of box drivers or use the proprietary drivers via the interface given by the distro. 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.howtogeek.com/214571/how-to-dual-boot-linux-on-your-pc/amp/

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+fusi0n    1,909
6 hours ago, Technique said:

Yeah I went on Nvidia’s website last night and got the driver. 

 

How do I install Linux on a drive that’s already in use?

 

i have a 2TB drive that I currently use to dump files on from within Windows. Videos, pictures, documents etc but there’s plenty of space left over that I could spare for a Linux install - I just don’t want to lose the Windows files obviously. 

 

I was thinking of partitioning off say 200GB to give this thing a real try to see if I like it. Just how would I do it?

The installer will walk you through partitioning the drive.  Just backup everything just in case ;)

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Technique    34

Out of interest what boot screen would i be left with if i dual (well, it'd be triple booted wouldn't it) booted Linux (probably Mint) with 2x Windows 7 installs?

 

For the record, the 3 installs would be on 3 different physical drives. Wont make a difference will it?

 

Windows boot:

BOOT01.thumb.png.c49d676c09ae4e12db3e6f17e8e20c83.png

 

 

And when i googled dual booting with linux i saw this boot screen which looks a bit meh...

BOOT02.thumb.png.c5fdb4ef29aa5ffc2da995e14f2ca9b3.png

 

 

I suppose in the grand scheme of things it doesn't really matter what the boot screen looks like as you wont be looking at it for that long. I just wondered.

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+fusi0n    1,909

It will be the second one. The first screen is using the Windows boot manager and the second one is GRUB. 

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xMorpheousx416    26
Quote

Though that last part - i'm ideally wanting a fresh install as i don't like the laggy nature of the Virtual Machine. I've had a look at the ASUS website and while there are drivers for the LAN side of the motherboard, there was no mention of sound drivers.

 

Understandable, considering you're using a dual core CPU.  You'll only be allowed to allocate a single core for Linux (or any OS) with a VM.

Sound drivers for Linux will either be installed with the distro (Mint/Cinnamon and Zorin OS both recognized my SoundBlaster Z), or found on the card developer's website.
Drivers are typically installed via the Terminal.

Quote

How do I install Linux on a drive that’s already in use?

Back up your stuff.  Using Windows Management, you can shrink the volume of the drive/partition.  Windows will let your shrink the volume depending on how much free space is available.

Warning:  messing around with any partition already in use, may lead to data loss or corruption.  This is an "at your own risk" decision.

Quote

Out of interest what boot screen would i be left with...

 

The boot manager belongs to the OS you installed last.  If it's Windows, the first one.. Linux, the second.  

Quote

For the record, the 3 installs would be on 3 different physical drives. Wont make a difference will it?

 

No.  Don't confuse "drives" with "partitions".  Drives are the physical device, whereas partitions are the allocated space.  Drives must be partitioned before they can be used at all.  If you create a single partition to use all the space, you'll end up with a single drive letter.  Four partitions on one drive, four drive (partition) letters.

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adrynalyne    10,897
Just now, xMorpheousx416 said:

 

Understandable, considering you're using a dual core CPU.  You'll only be allowed to allocate a single core for Linux (or any OS) with a VM.

 

If that’s true, it’s only the case with type 2 hypervisors. 

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