PC Health Check says "Your organisation manages updates on this PC"


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@slawek Ah well, so maybe when Windows 11 is released - and everybody experiencing this error have upgraded already, with no error messages from the within-upgrade itself on this Office365 business thingy - and thán 6 months ahead, they kinda fix this PC Check Health tool to 'solve' this issue :ike:

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3 hours ago, kiddingguy said:

The newly released version didn't fix the message of my organization running this thing :(

Not surprised. Just remove the accounts before upgrading?

 

 

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One time I asked MS why in .NET the names of the days of the week (or maybe the names of the months) are not localized even though I have enabled the appropriate locale (writing a program in VB.NET) and that some other things have changed according to the selected culture and language.

 

The answer from MS came about a year and a half later, when I forgot about the case. And it wasn't something like "we fixed it" or even "we'll fix it in the future." But stating that this is not a bug but a feature. And that the case is closed. Nevertheless, it must be admitted that during this time someone was working hard to come up with an answer.

 

It was similar with the "start menu". People rioted, Microsoft relented, restored the start menu disappeared in Windows 8. But that took "some" time, maybe two or three years if I remember correctly (Windows 8.1). It's fully back in Windows 10.

 

This is Newton's second law of motion: the change in momentum per unit time is directly proportional to force but inversely proportional to mass. MS is very heavy, so it is difficult to make quick changes. Nevertheless, after a sufficiently long (reaching infinity) time, some changes may be observable.

 

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1 hour ago, slawek said:

This was to be expected. MS takes much longer to respond meaningfully. First, the regular employee has to report the problem upwards. This then has to be considered at all appropriate levels. Then distributed down to specific employees. Then a bit of rocking around with code auditing, quality control and transferring between different departments. Finally, management again - checking that everything was done right. It's probably not Waterfall, but some PRINCE2 / SCRUM etc. At least not Agile as it would be appropriate for a small company. Microsoft is micro in name only. My guess is that programmers in MS account for less than 30% of the staff.

 

If what you are saying is true, then how did they release a new version in 24 hours?

 

I’m telling ya, I don’t think this is a bug. The OS sees these accounts as in control of managing settings involved in upgrading. The program is merely reading that. It doesn’t even need to be an MS account. 
 

What WOULD be silly is if they went back and threw together a spaghetti code solution for virtually every managed setup out there. That’s basically what you are asking for. 

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22 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Not surprised. Just remove the accounts before upgrading?

 

 

That’s always in option in due time when Windows 11 is officially upgradable for eligible Win10 users.

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Even when the "Managed by your Org" message applies, I'm not sure the harm in just informing the user if the device they're running is compatible with Windows 11. I mean, the user had enough local privs to run the app....

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32 minutes ago, JustGeorge said:

Even when the "Managed by your Org" message applies, I'm not sure the harm in just informing the user if the device they're running is compatible with Windows 11. I mean, the user had enough local privs to run the app....

I don’t recall the app asking for admin rights while running so I am not sure that’s a good indicator of anything. This would be another one of those, let’s see if we can detect how virtually every self-managed account out here affects Windows deals. 

 

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1 hour ago, adrynalyne said:

If what you are saying is true, then how did they release a new version in 24 hours?

 

I’m telling ya, I don’t think this is a bug. The OS sees these accounts as in control of managing settings involved in upgrading. The program is merely reading that. It doesn’t even need to be an MS account. 
 

What WOULD be silly is if they went back and threw together a spaghetti code solution for virtually every managed setup out there. That’s basically what you are asking for. 

 

It is a bug. PC Health Check check HARDWARE. Therefore, it is a serious bug if it gives different results depending on which account someone is logged in on. Hey, has something changed in the hardware? No! So there must always be the same result. The other behavior is just a bug.

 

This is a bug. There is no point in denying it.

 

Another nasty bug is that anybody manage settings unknow to the legitimate administrator. The bug is that these settings are not avaliable to edit/inspection with gpedit.msc. The bug is that the message is misty and that tell about "organisation" instead who is responsilble.

 

Luckily I'm not a sysadmin ... but what do you think these women and these men won't be overloaded with phone calls and e-mails right now? The first impulse I picked up the phone myself, luckily (for my network provider administrator) it was already night and I didn't call.

 

 

Regarding the spaghetti code - I wish to see source code of Windows 11 😉

 

Spaghetti code is overrated. Currently (maybe except me) nobody writes in Fortran IV, Cobol, QBasic. You cannot use the goto keyword in Java, there is no goto in Python. I've never needed a C++ goto all my life. Why I would use goto in K&R C having long jumps? 😁 But maybe I wrongly assume that MS programmers are no less capable than I am? Maybe I mistakenly assume that apart from junior and regular they also have senior programmers? Maybe it is not true that in MS programmers do code audits, write unit tests, do integration etc.?

46 minutes ago, JustGeorge said:

Even when the "Managed by your Org" message applies, I'm not sure the harm in just informing the user if the device they're running is compatible with Windows 11. I mean, the user had enough local privs to run the app....

True.

 

You are perfectly right about this.

Edited by slawek
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25 minutes ago, slawek said:

 

It is a bug. PC Health Check check HARDWARE. Therefore, it is a serious bug if it gives different results depending on which account someone is logged in on. Hey, has something changed in the hardware? No! So there must always be the same result. The other behavior is just a bug.

 

This is a bug. There is no point in denying it.

 

Another nasty bug is that anybody manage settings unknow to the legitimate administrator. The bug is that these settings are not avaliable to edit/inspection with gpedit.msc. The bug is that the message is misty and that tell about "organisation" instead who is responsilble.

 

Luckily I'm not a sysadmin ... but what do you think these women and these men won't be overloaded with phone calls and e-mails right now? The first impulse I picked up the phone myself, luckily (for my network provider administrator) it was already night and I didn't call.

 

 

Regarding the spaghetti code - I wish to see source code of Windows 11 😉

 

Spaghetti code is overrated. Currently (maybe except me) nobody writes in Fortran IV, Cobol, QBasic. You cannot use the goto keyword in Java, there is no goto in Python. I've never needed a C++ goto all my life. Why I would use goto in K&R C having long jumps? 😁 But maybe I wrongly assume that MS programmers are no less capable than I am? Maybe I mistakenly assume that apart from junior and regular they also have senior programmers? Maybe it is not true that in MS programmers do code audits, write unit tests, do integration etc.?

True.

 

You are perfectly right about this.

PC Health check clearly doesn’t just check hardware. Spaghetti code isn’t overrated, it’s garbage altogether. It shouldn’t’ be rated as anything other than. 


Anyway, this conversation has become pointless because it seems to constantly shift into ways for you to talk about yourself and it’s counterproductive.

 

Have a good day. 

 

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4 hours ago, adrynalyne said:

[...] it’s counterproductive.

 

Have a good day. 

 

I was nice to talk and I agree with you:

  • we found a workaround,
  • MS should not write spaghetti code,
  • PC Health Manager had bugs
  • and has been improved
  • and would be (maybe) fully fixed in the future

Thus it is hard to say that our talk was counterproductive - many people, regular users, will benefit from reading our exchange of ideas.

 

I also agree with you that the bad spaghetti is bad. Especially it is a spaghetti code. But once again - most bugs in real programs are caused not by the misterious spaghetti (goto and labels), but by more sophisticated errors. Poor architecture, bad algorithms, missing or bad unit tests, common but subtle typographical errors, race coditions, vulnerability to hacking, even bugs in compilers and CPU microcode. Believe me, the art of programming can't just be reduced to a simple "don't use goto" rule...

 

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I used my student discount to purchase win 10 edu years ago, not only because it cost me next to nothing, but it is essentially win 10 enterprise.  in any event, I am getting the nonsense error that my school manages my computer, which is ridiculous for many reasons, but I also use o&o win10shutup to block all the bs telemetry, so I do not know if it is simply because I have win 10 edu, o&o shutup, or a combination of both, but regardless, I wanted to share this tool that I found on github (I am not the author) that is much more comprehensive than the tool from m$, so anyone facing this issue can use this tool.

Link: https://github.com/rcmaehl/WhyNotWin11

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Hello,

There are several times in the past when I have received this error message due to my having made some change to the default settings for Windows Updates.   It did not seem to matter what the change was; just that a non-default setting triggered the warning.


Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

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