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Why are widescreen TVs the new standard?

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bobbytomorow    0

plus they look cool

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TruckWEB    480

Most of the movies I have on Blu-Ray are 2.35:1. So even on my widescreen TV, I still get the black bars on top and bottom.

Nothing ever seems to fit.... I think that aspect ratio is a huge flop for everything TV, movies since it's existence.

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DaDude    46
Most of the movies I have on Blu-Ray are 2.35:1. So even on my widescreen TV, I still get the black bars on top and bottom.

Nothing ever seems to fit.... I think that aspect ratio is a huge flop for everything TV, movies since it's existence.

I never understood why they made some movies in 2.35:1. Why can?t they just make everything 1.85:1?

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DaDude    46
Yeah, Philips is totally about to start selling 21:9 TVs: http://i.gizmodo.com/5132065/philips-ultra...ars-to-the-side

Now that is just silly. Here are some reasons why:

1. You will have A LOT of empty space when watching 4:3 content

2. DVDs and BDs aren?t set up for this aspect ratio.

3. Only certain movies are filmed in this aspect ratio.

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Rigby    1,577

Just about all I watch are old TV shows, meaning with a widescreen 90% of the time I would have black bars on each side. That would be pretty annoying.

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DaDude    46
Just about all I watch are old TV shows, meaning with a widescreen 90% of the time I would have black bars on each side. That would be pretty annoying.

Yeah, I watch some old TV shows on DVD and the black bars on the side are slightly annoying. Personally, black bars on the side aren?t as bothersome as black bars on the top and bottom. What?s mainly annoying is fear of getting image retention. I?ve watched a number of 4:3 content with black bars on the side and I never had that problem yet.

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jerzdawg    338

What cable company do you have?.... for me all of the major networks fox, nbc, abc, cbs all start broadcasting their HD content @ 16x9 at 5 to 6 pm for the news followed by the primetime shows... again.. all in 16x9.. the my other 30-40 hd channels show all 16x9 content except for a few older movies and the daytime shows....

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Victor V.    0
thinking about it for a moment; I bet currently the usage on our hdtv's in our household is around 75% HD widescreen; 15% SD widescreen; and 10% 4:3 SD content.

so; we are making good usage of the wide format of our tv's; so it being the standard nowadays sounds right to me

I'm pretty sure OP's point is why you had to buy it (they only sold it) in first place.

Must be the TV our Sharp LCD does a great job of stretching the picture without blur or distortion.

Okay, buddy. But try comparing the gentleman's 16:9 ear to the 4:3 ear. You'd think he is an elf.

Edited by Cidinho

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kylejn    0
Before I begin, let me just say that I have a widescreen LCD TV and I absolutely love it. I would not trade it in for a 4:3 TV. But I have a few friends who say that they hate widescreen TVs for three reasons:

1. Most TV content that's broadcasted are not widescreen, which means you'll get black bars on both sides.

2. Some channels stretch the image, resulting in a distorted picture.

3. When watching 4:3 content you get black bars on the right and left sides of the screen. When watching 2:35:1 movies, you get black bars on the top and bottom of the TV. So, you need to watch a movie/show with an aspect ratio of 1.78 or 1.85:1 to fill the entire screen and only a fraction of movies/shows are filmed in that ratio.

As much as I love widescreen TVs, my friends do have a point. So, my question is: how did widescreen TVs become a standard since they have many flaws (and even more flaws than 4:3 TVs)?

1. From what I've seen, nearly all primetime shows and sports events are broadcast in HD. Heck, I can't think of anything I watch that isn't widescreen, except stuff like Family Guy.

2. I don't know of a channel that stretches the picture; that's always a setting on the TV.

3. Well, 4:3 content is either going to have black bars on the size, be stretched (as noted in #2), or be zoomed in. It's a widescreen TV, after all. 1.78:1 and 1.85:1 movies can be stretched to fill the screen with minimal distortion, and it's really only the major blockbusters that are filmed in 2.35:1. However, if it's really bothering you, there's always the Philips Ultra-Widescreen 21:9 Cinema HDTV, which has a ratio of 2.33:1.

Just pass this on to your friends who are ragging on widescreen televisions. :)

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DaDude    46
2. I don't know of a channel that stretches the picture; that's always a setting on the TV.

Watch an episode of "Friends" on TBS and get back to me.

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Chris-Gonzales    0

I look at it like human vision. Look towards a wall in your room, you can see a lot, you dont just see the object your looking at or a small "box" like vision,

16X9 is still new,

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mancode20    2

I have a question regarding this. My cousin and I just watched the Super Bowl on his new Samsung 46' 1080p. The one with the touch of red design. Now I assume the Super Bowl was shot in 16x9, cause it was obviously in HD. He likes to watch it full screen, but I told him it's better to watch it in widescreen. He has a widescreen TV after all. Do you really lose some aspects (no pun intended) of the picture if you're not watching it in widescreen? I tried to explain to him how some of the text didn't fit the screen properly. Like the kickoff counter on the bottom of the screen was kind of cutoff. If you're watching 16x9 content in HD, it's better to watch it in widescreen mode, yes? Help me settle this debate.

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DaDude    46
I have a question regarding this. My cousin and I just watched the Super Bowl on his new Samsung 46' 1080p. The one with the touch of red design. Now I assume the Super Bowl was shot in 16x9, cause it was obviously in HD. He likes to watch it full screen, but I told him it's better to watch it in widescreen. He has a widescreen TV after all. Do you really lose some aspects (no pun intended) of the picture if you're not watching it in widescreen? I tried to explain to him how some of the text didn't fit the screen properly. Like the kickoff counter on the bottom of the screen was kind of cutoff. If you're watching 16x9 content in HD, it's better to watch it in widescreen mode, yes? Help me settle this debate.

Yes, 16:9 content shows more. However, they're filmed in a way so all the important stuff is shown in the center, so when it's cropped for 4:3 channels, you don't lose anything important.

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jerzdawg    338
Watch an episode of "Friends" on TBS and get back to me.

this show was never filmed in 16:9... im guessing your main problem is with TBS stretching it?

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DaDude    46
im guessing your main problem is with TBS stretching it?

Yes. mancode20 claimed that HD channels don't stretch their 4:3 shows. But TBS HD does stretch them rather than having black bars on the sides.

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+StevoFC    21
What?s mainly annoying is fear of getting image retention. I?ve watched a number of 4:3 content with black bars on the side and I never had that problem yet.

That will never happen with your tv...

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Coldgunner    12

My LCD gets some image retention, but its barely noticable and disappears after a short while.

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DaDude    46
My LCD gets some image retention, but its barely noticable and disappears after a short while.

What brand is your TV?

Also, how long do you watch 4:3 content with black bars? Because I've watched up to 3 hours of 4:3 shows with black bars and still never got image retention. So, I believe that you have to have those black bars on for an awful long time for image retention to occur.

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Coldgunner    12

blacks don't seem to be effected, just stuff like channel logos etc. I have quite a lot of DVD's in 4:3 as well as a lot of movies that are in 2:40:1, I get no retention either way from the black bars.

Mine a Samsung btw.

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shakey_snake    1
Does that take into account peripheral vision?

Because it would seem we see a heck of a lot more on the sides than that, just not directly.

Each eyeball actually sees your vision in a circle.

The extra width comes from having 2 eyes spaced apart horizontally. ;)

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Jason S.    1,504
Hmm? Didn't know they were the "standard" to begin with. I think they just plainly look like crap, out of proportion, and mess up the picture.

I'm not much of a tv person though. If it wasn't for the wife and kid, I probably wouldn't even own a television, let alone waste my money on some sub standard wide screenie!!

it must be a southern thang then :p

the reason you think they look like crap is b/c youre not used to it yet. 4:3 tvs were out for so long... it's a drastic change.

there's people that'll say HD movies look no better than SD movies :wacko:

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Budious    0
this show was never filmed in 16:9... im guessing your main problem is with TBS stretching it?

Seinfeld was never shot in 16:9 either, but TBS has cropped and upscaled (remastered) the originals and they look very nice. I would assume they do the same for Friends eventually.

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Hupp    0
Seinfeld was never shot in 16:9 either, but TBS has cropped and upscaled (remastered) the originals and they look very nice. I would assume they do the same for Friends eventually.
The cable superstation TBS has recently begun airing Seinfeld in true high-definition, rather than stretching the traditional episodes originally broadcast in standard-definition. As Seinfeld was filmed in 35 mm film with Panavision cameras, each episode was cropped for standard television broadcast in the 1990s. To achieve 16:9 format Sony Pictures has included extra area from the 35 mm film on the left and right that was not included in the original 4:3 cuts of the 1990s, but also cropped out top and bottom parts of the original 4:3 picture

wiki...

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