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noticable bluray quality difference


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me and my friend are having a sort of argument, he seems to think that an untouched bluray disc looks noticablely better than an mkv down to about 10gb.

my argument is that the high bitrate and size of bluray video is because they can, but it can be squashed down to 10gb or so with minimal impact, but he thinks im wrong and he's done a lot of comparisons and that he can see the difference instantly.

any thoughts on this?

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nah sound quality isnt a factor in this, purely video.

he reckons its instantly noticable from the orginal blu ray disc if its been compressed to 10gb or so.

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I think there is indeed a noticeable difference, but it's only seem when a single frame is analyzed or too many colors and grades are being visualized. But for you to notice this you must be very sensitive or simply a douche bag. :p

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You also have to understand whats in that mkv. On the blu-ray disc you have a few different copies of the movie in each resolution (1080i or 720p), then 2 or 3 different audio channels. You know DTS, Dolby 5.1, etc. In the mkv you strictly have one compressed video either 1080i or 720p and then one audio stream usually the DTS. You really aren't missing out on much just all the useless extras that come along on a blu-ray disc that bulk up the size by a lot. So it's definitely "squashed" but its a lot different then you are picturing.

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There is a difference in scenes where a lot goes on at the same time (fire shots or explosions etc), but you really won't be able to tell right away.

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There is a difference in scenes where a lot goes on at the same time (fire shots or explosions etc), but you really won't be able to tell right away.

Honestly I've never seen any difference. I have watched and streamed an mkv version of the same movie via PS3 media server and there's no difference. Just takes a good PC with a decent CPU and a good amount of ram.

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depends how good the rip is and how much its being compressed by,

I could notice the difference between transfomers 2 10gb 1080p rip against the blu ray, but some other films i cant see the difference but again that couldve been down to a bad rip

you stick the x264 settings on insane, and let your comp compress it for 24 hours or so, then you wont really notice the difference, but if you compress it with quick settings that takes a few hours to compress then yeah you will see the difference

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To be bluntly honest, I don't see "THAT" much difference between a high quality DVD and a BluRay movie (as long as it's on a good screen)

Certainly not worth paying (more) for, at least.

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  • 1 month later...
cE' date='21 February 2010 - 22:43' timestamp='1266792182' post='592266268']

You also have to understand whats in that mkv. On the blu-ray disc you have a few different copies of the movie in each resolution (1080i or 720p), then 2 or 3 different audio channels. You know DTS, Dolby 5.1, etc. In the mkv you strictly have one compressed video either 1080i or 720p and then one audio stream usually the DTS. You really aren't missing out on much just all the useless extras that come along on a blu-ray disc that bulk up the size by a lot. So it's definitely "squashed" but its a lot different then you are picturing.

Some false info in here... mkv is merely a container... It can contain as many audio / video / subtitle streams as you like. Further more it isn't just 1080i or 720p, it can contain any res of file you like.

On topic, not all rips are made equal. Compression settings are there for a reason and make a world of difference. At 10GB to 14GB you really shouldn't be seeing any difference between a Blu-Ray disc and the rip.

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Some false info in here... mkv is merely a container... It can contain as many audio / video / subtitle streams as you like. Further more it isn't just 1080i or 720p, it can contain any res of file you like.

On topic, not all rips are made equal. Compression settings are there for a reason and make a world of difference. At 10GB to 14GB you really shouldn't be seeing any difference between a Blu-Ray disc and the rip.

There are people out there, who can hear the difference between wav and flac :)

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There are people out there, who can hear the difference between wav and flac :)

Are you sure? I was under the impression they sounded exactly the same...

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cE' date='21 February 2010 - 22:43' timestamp='1266792182' post='592266268']

You also have to understand whats in that mkv. On the blu-ray disc you have a few different copies of the movie in each resolution (1080i or 720p), then 2 or 3 different audio channels. You know DTS, Dolby 5.1, etc. In the mkv you strictly have one compressed video either 1080i or 720p and then one audio stream usually the DTS. You really aren't missing out on much just all the useless extras that come along on a blu-ray disc that bulk up the size by a lot. So it's definitely "squashed" but its a lot different then you are picturing.

The blu ray disc carries only the 1080p version, for 1080i and 720p it downscales the image.

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