Biggest Gripes with Linux?


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Syanide

^ that's all rumors at this point. I'm 100% sure it won't happen in 11.04. Though replacing one with the other isn't really a problem.

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ncc50446

Networking seems to be a pain in the butt...

At work, just installed Mandriva 2010.2, and installed Samba. But it's having troubles reading the network with Vista and XP on it...Though I did get the dual monitor problem sorted out. Somewhat...

When you maximize a window, it stretches across 2 screens...Not just the one monitor...But oh well.

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Vlad

Proper Windows key handling.

To this day I don't believe KDE4/gnome/et al properly handle the Windows key, which I prefer to function identically to Windows.

If I press the Windows key, I want the gnome/kde/etc menu to appear.

If I hold the Windows key and press another key (such as Windows+L), I expect some sort of configured macro to be executed (such as locking the screen).

Last time I checked it was still either/or...for the last 12 years.

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Syanide

^ yeah, and I'd like ctrl-alt-right arrow to move me to the next workspace in Windows. It's a different OS, of course it'd have different key combos. Having said that, I'm pretty sure Gnome 3 uses the windows key to invoke 'activities,' which is the menu, although a slightly different concept.

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threetonesun

Proper Windows key handling.

To this day I don't believe KDE4/gnome/et al properly handle the Windows key, which I prefer to function identically to Windows.

If I press the Windows key, I want the gnome/kde/etc menu to appear.

If I hold the Windows key and press another key (such as Windows+L), I expect some sort of configured macro to be executed (such as locking the screen).

Last time I checked it was still either/or...for the last 12 years.

I've never understood the point in Windows of the Windows key opening the menu. You can use the Windows key in Gnome to run Docky, which is much better than popping up a drop down menu, or going through a run dialog. Makes it similar to OS X, which, IMO, has the better interface for running programs / open documents out of all three major operating systems.

Win + L is nice, obviously, but I believe there is a similar shortcut in Gnome that I'm just not familiar with.

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ichi

Win + L is nice, obviously, but I believe there is a similar shortcut in Gnome that I'm just not familiar with.

Ctrl + Alt + L, but can be remapped on "system -> preferences -> keyboard shortcuts".

Proper Windows key handling.

I understand what you mean, but then again "proper" is relative :p

For me the "winkey" (aka Super) is just a modifier, so it makes sense (to me) that it works the same as Alt or Ctrl.

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Flawed

Pretty much every HP printer out there works to some extent. HP produces the best drivers for Linux hands down.

Personally, I have a wireless deskjet F4580 and it works like a dream. I just go to system->admin->printing, click add printer, then wait a few seconds for ubuntu to detect the printer on the network, and that's it, select it and Ubuntu will install the drivers automatically.

Proper Windows key handling.

To this day I don't believe KDE4/gnome/et al properly handle the Windows key, which I prefer to function identically to Windows.

If I press the Windows key, I want the gnome/kde/etc menu to appear.

If I hold the Windows key and press another key (such as Windows+L), I expect some sort of configured macro to be executed (such as locking the screen).

Last time I checked it was still either/or...for the last 12 years.

Well it's called the Super Key in Linux. For instance, try pressing the Super Key + e . It's mostly assigned for activating compiz, so no it wont behave like windows by default.

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wro

Linux is like dating an unsociable ugly chick who's good at Math. The Windows chick is easier on the eyes and blends in much better with others.

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.Neo

Actually i think i read somewhere that the folks over at Canonical are going to ditch evolution for Mozilla Firebird. Either in Ubuntu 11.04 or 11.10.

Yay, more cross-platform crap as part of the OS! (Y)

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x-scratch

that every distro i have tried i can not shutdown my computer 100% unless i use some modded kernel

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OuchOfDeath

that every distro i have tried i can not shutdown my computer 100% unless i use some modded kernel

Now that is a problem that I have never heard anyone else ever have before. That's definitely not one of the common linux complaints.

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matt4pack

All the stupid application names many which don't even describe what the app does.

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The_Observer

gaming is my biggest one!

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Solid Knight

All the stupid application names many which don't even describe what the app does.

You mean kGFileBlaster32+ isn't a good name for an e-mail client?

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James7

You mean kGFileBlaster32+ isn't a good name for an e-mail client?

Yeah, and Powerpoint, Entourage, Access, Excel, Safari, Firefox, Chrome, etc, tell us exactly what they do just with their names! ;)

My favourite Linux program name is hot-babe. Description from synaptic?

Hot-babe is a small graphical utility which display the system activity

in a very special way. When the CPU is idle, it displays a dressed girl,

and when the activity goes up, as the temperature increases, the girl

begins to undress, to finish totally naked when the system activity

reaches 100%. Of course, if you can be shocked by nudity, don't use it!

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.Neo

Yeah, and Powerpoint, Entourage, Access, Excel, Safari, Firefox, Chrome, etc, tell us exactly what they do just with their names! ;)

"Mail" is pretty self-explanatory though.

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ichi

"Mail" is pretty self-explanatory though.

So is KMail, even with the K prefix.

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Jen Smith
So is KMail, even with the K prefix.

Kyou kkind kof kget kused kto kthem kputting ka kk kin kfront kof kall ktheir kapplication knames kafter ka kwhile.. kstart kto ktune kit kout keventually.

My biggest gripe would probably have to be some distros bending over backwards trying to be like Windows or Mac, and the flood of new users griping that their Windows games don't run properly or at all on said distros. If I wanted to use Windows, I'll fire up my Windows 7 desktop and do it right. As impressive a programming job that Wine is, sometimes wish it didn't even exist. That and the K's and G's prefixing everything and anything. I know what DE I'm using, don't need the constant reminder.

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ichi

That and the K's and G's prefixing everything and anything.

Well, fortunately that prefix convention seems to be deprecated already.

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Jen Smith
Well, fortunately that prefix convention seems to be deprecated already.

Really? Don't think the KDE developers got that memo.

From the base KDE packages (4.6.0-2.. that's the latest) you got kwrite, konsole, konqueror, kfind, keditbookmarks, kdialog, koffice, kwin, kaddressbook, kalarm, kleopatra, kmail, knotes, knode, kontact, korganizer, kresources, kmag, kmousetool, kmouth, kcron, ksystemlog, kuser... yadda yadda I could go on for hours but just check your local repositories, in no mood to retype something that's found elsewhere. And that's just KDE itself, not the slew of third party stuff.

Same goes for Gnome, except they're on a G kick, but at least not quite as extreme.

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ichi

Really? Don't think the KDE developers got that memo.

From the base KDE packages (4.6.0-2.. that's the latest) you got kwrite, konsole, konqueror, kfind, keditbookmarks, kdialog, koffice, kwin, kaddressbook, kalarm, kleopatra, kmail, knotes, knode, kontact, korganizer, kresources, kmag, kmousetool, kmouth, kcron, ksystemlog, kuser... yadda yadda I could go on for hours but just check your local repositories, in no mood to retype something that's found elsewhere. And that's just KDE itself, not the slew of third party stuff.

Same goes for Gnome, except they're on a G kick, but at least not quite as extreme.

There are lots of old apps that will surely retain their Ks, but new ones aren't so rigid. There's for example the Calligra Suite (formerly KOffice) which could have easily been named "Kalligra", but wasn't.

On Gnome there're quite a few well known non-"G" apps already: banshee, exaile, totem, brasero...

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Syanide

Truth be told, it's like there is an unwritten rule (or a written GPL requirement) to come up with a stupid name for your open source app. I think most of that comes from the fact that, like Linux itself, most apps were enthusiasts' work, so it's not like much thought was put into process, I doubt GIMP had chasing Photoshop in their mind when they started out. Having said that, I'm still confused with some names, MeeGo being the prime example. At least Moblin easily indicated what it is and what it's for.

But yeah, as it progresses, things improve, the aforementioned Calligra being nice example of that. Gnome was never as bad as KDE, but I guess that's because more DEs use GTK, so there wasn't a need to Gapitalize everythinG.

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threetonesun

I always thought GIMP was a fairly clever name. And had a decent mascot.

Of all things Linux, I can't find fault with the open source software. A lot of it is pretty amazing stuff, and free. I prefer using Inkscape over Illustrator when knocking out a quick drawing, and it's a lot cheaper. :cool:

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x-scratch

gaming is my biggest one!

yeah only games i can play native on linux are quake wars & unreal other then that gaming sucks on linux

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James7

"Mail" is pretty self-explanatory though.

Yes, but most Linux program names actually do tell you something about what they do.

And when a program name is ambiguous, you can get Ubuntu or other such user-friendly distros that specify things. Example: is GIMP ('GNU Image Manipulation Program') too obscure? Ubuntu has it as 'GIMP Image Editor'. Example: Are you biatched about Inkscape? Ubuntu has it as 'Inkscape Vector Graphics Editor'.

This 'name' issue is a non-issue, probably fabricated for FUD purposes originally in the cellar of some corporate headquarters or other.

Names of programs on any platform are at times a bit 'creative'. So what? Are we as human beings so limited we can't cope with that? Oh dear. ;)

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