The direction Microsoft took with Windows 8  

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Noir Angel

The poll is actually surprising given all the Windows 8 hate that shows up around here, the difference is only ~3% so far.

I'm surprised for a different reason, the attitude of "Swallow the changes because Microsoft are awesome" seems to be more common around here. The difference may be small but it's telling in my opinion, from what I can remember almost everyone here apart from a couple of XP diehards that hated 7 simply because it wasn't XP loved 7.

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Dashel

Yea, the Metro RDF is surprisingly strong around here.

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Dot Matrix

Putting it on a desktop for use with a mouse and keyboard is just plain stupid.

This has been said over and over. But the desktop PC is changing, and the mouse just isn't an end all anymore. There are other devices coming onto the market that just won't work with Windows 7 or less. Windows 8 was developed to be device neutral, so that users can adapt to new technologies and new ways of doing things without trouble.

I'm not sure why so many "power users" are against this change, but it's about time. Microsoft caught how much flak from the market for trying Windows 7 on these devices, that ultimately proved futile, not to mention AiOs are appearing on the market that Windows 7 is also wasted on.

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Astra.Xtreme

This has been said over and over. But the desktop PC is changing, and the mouse just isn't an end all anymore. There are other devices coming onto the market that just won't work with Windows 7 or less. Windows 8 was developed to be device neutral, so that users can adapt to new technologies and new ways of doing things without trouble.

I'm not sure why so many "power users" are against this change, but it's about time. Microsoft caught how much flak from the market for trying Windows 7 on these devices, that ultimately proved futile, not to mention AiOs are appearing on the market that Windows 7 is also wasted on.

The problem is that people aren't given the choice to adapt. They are forced to adapt. What you said would be true if there was an option to turn Metro off; but there isn't.

Windows has always been about freedom and control of the OS, but 8 has completely taken that away by forcing this alien interface on everybody. The Windows UI has been generally the same since Win 95, and most people still barely have learned to navigate around it since then. Throwing that all away and making people start fresh isn't going to go over well. People generally don't like change, especially when it is forced on them.

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Dot Matrix

The problem is that people aren't given the choice to adapt. They are forced to adapt. What you said would be true if there was an option to turn Metro off; but there isn't.

Windows has always been about freedom and control of the OS, but 8 has completely taken that away by forcing this alien interface on everybody. The Windows UI has been generally the same since Win 95, and most people still barely have learned to navigate around it since then. Throwing that all away and making people start fresh isn't going to go over well. People generally don't like change, especially when it is forced on them.

No one's forcing you to upgrade to Windows 8. You still have Windows 7, Mac OSX, or various Linux distros to choose from.

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Colin McGregor

I like Windows 8. I hate that everyone on this site feels they each need a post asking if people like or dislike windows 8, or a post about how they hate windows 8

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articuno1au

I'm surprised for a different reason, the attitude of "Swallow the changes because Microsoft are awesome" seems to be more common around here. The difference may be small but it's telling in my opinion, from what I can remember almost everyone here apart from a couple of XP diehards that hated 7 simply because it wasn't XP loved 7.

That or it's just not as bad a system as you think..

It being your point of view doesnt make it right or the popular view. It just makes it your point of view..

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neo1911

Right now my major complaint is consistency.

Some menu items are too small to read and some are gigantically huge. I loved the huge fonts and wish the desktop app could use some help. The hi-res screen on 15" MBP is not exactly eye friendly.

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ichi

Yeah, but that's only if you choose to interact with Metro apps.

I am using literally 0 metro apps, and using Windows 8 like it was 7.

There is literally no difference in workflow except the lack of jump lists in the start menu.

My gripe is not as much with Windows8 per se as with the general direction the OS is going. Even while there's still classic desktop there MS is pushing Metro as hard as they can, and if they have their way that's all you'll have in a few years.

Anyway, my situation is a bit different considering that if I switched to Windows 8 I wouldn't be moving from another previous Windows platform. I've never been too fond of window management in "classic", so Windows 8 would be at best about the same as Windows 7.

I guess I just wanted MS to come with a new UI that was actually more flexible, something that wowed me, that allowed me to do everything I can do now and still more and better. Even while Windows isn't my platform of choice I use it often at work, and I want to feel comfortable when working with it.

Metro isn't it (although if it became a full tiling window manager I might reconsider).

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Dashel

^Forgive me, but as an Apple owner as yourself, isn't that the direction you guys have been wanting forever anyway? (maybe not Metro, but definiately a 'it just works' appliance - which is the consumerism thats showing itself with Win8)

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Noir Angel

That or it's just not as bad a system as you think..

It being your point of view doesnt make it right or the popular view. It just makes it your point of view..

Whether people agree with my POV or not is something I frankly don't give a s*** about. The usability features that I dislike in Windows are important to me, and they will remain important to me regardless of how many MS humpers tell me I am wrong because I'm not supporting the awesomest company in the world. I form my own decisions, and other people form theirs based on their needs. Opinions were asked, and I provided mine, is there really any need for you people to constantly troll every thread that isn't chock full of Microsoft love post after post?

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Order_66

Neowin is a Windows biased computer tech forum full of geeks; if Windows 8 is getting any love at all it will be here. In the real world its going to be a lot more hated. If you think Vista flopped just wait until Windows 8 shows up on the market.

^This 100%.

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Dot Matrix

Neowin is a Windows biased computer tech forum full of geeks; if Windows 8 is getting any love at all it will be here. In the real world its going to be a lot more hated. If you think Vista flopped just wait until Windows 8 shows up on the market.

Not quite. Neowin is quite biased all right, but that's how most power users are. THey often forget they are not the target audience anymore, and can often not deal with consumerization of their favorite toys.

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Astra.Xtreme

No one's forcing you to upgrade to Windows 8. You still have Windows 7, Mac OSX, or various Linux distros to choose from.

Of course not. But people that buy new computers are forced to use it. Unless they pay somebody to downgrade them, which isn't realistic. Most people that buy a new computer are going to see Windows 8 and assume it's generally the same as it's been for the past 20 years, but they will sure be in for a surprise.

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Order_66

No one's forcing you to upgrade to Windows 8. You still have Windows 7, Mac OSX, or various Linux distros to choose from.

Which is exactly what quite a few people will do, myself included, I will happily stay with 7 and my OSX machines, linux is a fail from start to finish so it isn't even an option though I am a little partial to mint.

It's not just the horrible and poorly thought out metro interface that sucks, it's the attitude over in Redmond, forcing people to tolerate something they want nothing to do with will always end up going very badly for the ones who are trying to force their ideas.

Looking at the polls and opinions on neowin it becomes very clear that "8" is a complete dud, it will bomb horribly on the desktop, I predict that "8" will be worse than vista and ME combined.

The reason I use neowin to gauge my predictions is due to what TRC said, the majority of neowin is very biased toward microsoft, there is rabid fanboyism to the extreme here, and yet even the fanboys complain about "8" for one reason or another, even you have complained Dot Matrix.

Personally I don't "hate" windows 8, I really wished it would have been a good OS to upgrade to, it's always good to have new software to look forward to but the new stuff has to be better than the old stuff, "8" has taken so many steps backwards it's not even funny.

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+Steve B

I don't like Win8 because it appears that Microsoft is trying to merge an OS for tables and an OS for desktops. Metro UI is obviously geared for tablet/touch use and they give the awkward desktop app for people to use. My issue is that there are a lot of older generation of computer users that will be totally thrown off with what MS has done with Win8 and then removing things from the desktop app makes it even more weird. I feel that at least for a while they should've have made an OS for Windows Phone and tables (Metro) and continue making an OS for desktops that still use the desktop as the primary interface. This is the first time where I'm seriously considering not getting the next version of Windows.

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Noir Angel

That statement isn't completely true anyway. For hardcore gamers like myself, for example, staying current is pretty important if you want the latest and greatest features in games to keep working.

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mps69

To be honest I don't think that I'll be upgrading my wife's laptop when it's finally publicly released.

I've really only used the os once at the gadget show live, and I didn't feeling the love for it. To me the metro screen looks like it was designed by crayola crayons, and just doesn't seem intutitve as the pervious versions of Windows.

Maybe given time it might grow on me, but I'm not holding breath.

I do realise you can't please all the people all the time, but I think it will please most of the people.

What I am betting is giving ten years from now with all the new users they wont understand how user managed with older versions of Windows with its silly start button and using a mouse will be alien to them, like the current generation using a rotary dial phone.

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UncleSpellbinder

I love Windows 8. I'll be upgrading for sure. I love all that makes up Windows 8. No hacks. Start screen, metro apps the whole Windows 8 experience as intended. Looking forward to purchasing once it is released.

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ichi

^Forgive me, but as an Apple owner as yourself, isn't that the direction you guys have been wanting forever anyway? (maybe not Metro, but definiately a 'it just works' appliance - which is the consumerism thats showing itself with Win8)

Me? I've never owned a Mac or any other Apple device.

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hagjohn

I miss the days where the visual style was secondary to the excitement of getting in and seeing how things worked. Tech has gotten so lazy. It's embarrassing.

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Raa

I'm in the middle of the road. Some things I love, some things I don't like, depending on the machine I want...

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Growled

I'm in the middle of the road. Some things I love, some things I don't like, depending on the machine I want...

That's me. I have no strong opinion either way yet.

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Quillz

Neowin is a Windows biased computer tech forum full of geeks; if Windows 8 is getting any love at all it will be here. In the real world its going to be a lot more hated. If you think Vista flopped just wait until Windows 8 shows up on the market.

Actually, I think it's just the opposite. Most people will have no issues with Win8, just like most had no real issues with Vista. Instead, we'll only hear the complaints of a vocal minority. You rarely hear from those who use a product with no complaints.

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Astrum

Most people will have no issues with Win8, just like most had no real issues with Vista.

Well they had no issues with Vista, because they did not bother.

I guess corporations, for instance, will largely avoid Win8 as they did with Vista.

Personally I'm confused with Metro, as it is against my productivity understanding. So if it is better underhood than Win7, I will use it, yet I will hack it anyway.

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