• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  

"Why I

Recommended Posts

grayscale    236
It took me nearly half an hour to work out how to turn off my PC.

half an hour?! to find how to shut it down? and he's writing a 'review' of sorts? wow.

  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shane Nokes    739

Wow. That article is just filled with so much bad information that it's astounding. Anyone who attempts to point out ways to do what the author says cannot be done are met with ridicule.

I'm glad I don't ever go to that site.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zhangm    1,332

half an hour?! to find how to shut it down? and he's writing a 'review' of sorts? wow.

Thanks for that head's up. Now I know not to click the link and waste my time reading something that was written by someone who is apparently retarded.

I last bought a computer in 2008. Did they stop putting power buttons on them or something?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shane Nokes    739

Thanks for that head's up. Now I know not to click the link and waste my time reading something that was written by someone who is apparently retarded.

I last bought a computer in 2008. Did they stop putting power buttons on them or something?

To be fair, he was trying to find the OS based controls for it. However if he was running RTM, then the tutorial should have shown him how to access the hot corners and use the functionality there.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix    7,414

Wasn't this posted already? Or maybe I saw this on Twitter a while back, but the article is literally ****. The writing is horrendous, and the article is filled with misinformation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pam14160    319

Just another one of those "I just hate Windows 8" threads. What an idoit if it took that long to figure out how to shut down an OS regardless if which one it may have been. . . :rofl: :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Rev    388

Oh yeah, he's someone *I* personally want to take tech advice from.... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ottawa Gamerz    8

people do know u hit ur pcs power button it will turn off

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest xiphi   

I'm not exactly in love with 8, but even I know my way around the OS. Didn't take me long to figure out how to turn off/restart my PC. My only real major issue is with search. If I could have all of the results displayed first, that would be amazing! I have a few other issues, but that one is the one that really gets to me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joswin    25

Seems a good time...

Actually I had the exact same issue with finding the 'off' button. Of course there is a PC power button but I knew there must be a way inside the OS..... and I eventually just goggled it. Why its in settings I have no idea. Its almost as funny as having to click 'Start' to shut down.

I am running Windows 8 myself, as my primary OS. Some things I like, some things... not so much. But will give it some time. I do think Microsoft are going to be fixing things in Windows 9 to make it more desktop friendly again (for desktops that is). You almost feel like Microsoft does not care about desktop users, we are an after thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled    3,880

I suspect a lot of ordinary users are going to have similar problems.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hagjohn    2,186

half an hour?! to find how to shut it down? and he's writing a 'review' of sorts? wow.

and it would have took what 2 minutes to look it up on google? :rofl:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
theyarecomingforyou    10,366

I was hoping for an intellectual critique; instead I found a childish rant. (N)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joswin    25

I was hoping for an intellectual critique; instead I found a childish rant. (N)

Well he does bring up some valid points. Such as the Charms bar having a "Share" option that has absolutely no function on the desktop. Things like that make me feel like Microsoft don't particularly care for the desktop experience. There are lots of little 'niggles' with 8 that start to build up and leave you feeling frustrated at times. I have found things like the 'replace file' dialog to be frustrating because they tell you nothing about the files in question. In windows 7 it shows you a comparison. In windows 8 it forces you to click an option to see the same dialog (why!?).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
theyarecomingforyou    10,366
Well he does bring up some valid points.

I couldn't read the entire article because it was presented in such an infantile manner but I'm well aware that there are many legitimate criticisms to be made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tech085    34

Uninstalling Windows 8 is a step backwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Active.    1,695

Is the reviewer really that far off?

1 -Is Windows 8 not targeted at tablets? Where's all the Desktop innovation?

2- Did Sinofsky not say that "you can think of the Desktop as just another app"?

3- Would you not agree that Metro window management is cumbersome on a Desktop?

4- Is it not true that there are no (visible) on-screen controls for switching between Metro apps?

5- Are the Core apps not Metro only? Are they not lacking in functionality?

6-Would you not agree that the Mail app is barely adequate?

7-haven't used it

8-haven't used it

9-Isn't there widespread agreement that the video and music apps are at this point of very "average" quality?

10-I agree with the reviewer that it's terribly annoying to constantly have to right-click

11-eh?

12-matter of taste I guess

13-I think it's a fair point to criticize that there's practically no integration with Desktop apps when it comes to new search&share features

14-Bugs: If it's been the reviewer's experience then you'll have to accept that

15-No clock: Fair point I think

16-Harder to shut down - again, widespread agreement

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix    7,414

Well he does bring up some valid points. Such as the Charms bar having a "Share" option that has absolutely no function on the desktop. Things like that make me feel like Microsoft don't particularly care for the desktop experience. There are lots of little 'niggles' with 8 that start to build up and leave you feeling frustrated at times. I have found things like the 'replace file' dialog to be frustrating because they tell you nothing about the files in question. In windows 7 it shows you a comparison. In windows 8 it forces you to click an option to see the same dialog (why!?).

You're talking about two different aspects of the UI that use two different sets of coding. It's no secret that there's a lot of old, rotten coding left over from Windows of old. Going back through that and making it play nice with fresh, new coding is going to take some time. Personally, though, I have a hunch that you'll see the old, "classic" desktop blown away in favor of a new Metro one, with old "classic" apps running in a virtualized subset similar to how XP Mode works today.

Is the reviewer really that far off?

1 -Is Windows 8 not targeted at tablets? Where's all the Desktop innovation?

Do the new multi-mon features not count?

2- Did Sinofsky not say that "you can think of the Desktop as just another app"?

He might have, and in a sense it is. So what? I've found that I can honestly live without it, and don't need it in center focus all the time anymore, and on my laptop and HTPC, it just doesn't make sense when you really think about it. On my mid-range laptop, my multitasking is pretty limited and is easily substituted by Metro. On my HTPC, I don't even need the desktop at all.

3- Would you not agree that Metro window management is cumbersome on a Desktop?

No. How is it? I can still ALT-TAB in and out of Modern apps. How is that any more cumbersome than window management is now?

4- Is it not true that there are no (visible) on-screen controls for switching between Metro apps?

Is there something wrong with a chromeless UI? Once the user adapts the the hot corners, this won't be an issue.

5- Are the Core apps not Metro only? Are they not lacking in functionality?

Yes. But they're 1.0 products. The apps we use and love today started out the same way.

6-Would you not agree that the Mail app is barely adequate?

How so? I have it set up to receive all three of my primary e-mail accounts. Been using it without issues.

10-I agree with the reviewer that it's terribly annoying to constantly have to right-click

Personal usage, but I right click no more in Metro than I do on desktop and its apps.

15-No clock: Fair point I think

The clock is still there on the desktop, but in a chromeless UI, a constant clock makes no sense. It's easily accessible by pressing Win+C, or by going to the desktop by pressing Win+D.

16-Harder to shut down - again, widespread agreement

Again, the PC power settings are a fallacy. Right now, while I am in school, I live in my laptop. It never gets shutdown except at the end of the day when I go home. It's asleep when not in use , by just shutting the lid. My Desktop PC is automatically set to sleep after a set amount of time, otherwise I have the hardware button configure to put the PC to sleep as well. I just simply press the button as I get up and walk away, no need to mouse to the Charms bar. I have this same setup on Windows 7 as well, no need to navigate to the Start Menu. I just press the button and go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shane Nokes    739

It's targeted at Desktop, Laptop, & mobile devices like tablets. Yes, Sinofsky did say the desktop could be thought of as another app, which is a valid point, but not a negative one.

I would say there's also a TON of desktop changes, and most of them are very nice...so there was a lot of work put in there. Search actually searches the whole PC, not just a portion of it. Sure hitting search jumps you into the Metro/Modern/Whatever environment, but it still searches everywhere.

There's a clock on the desktop when you're there, and the clock can be easily opened up by pressing Win+C or going to the charms bar while in either environment, including inside of apps.. In fact that's an improvement to be honest. I will admit that I couldn't pull up Win+C inside of Deus Ex: Human Revolution right now, but I couldn't easily look at the clock while in games before anyways...

Shutdown/Restart is pretty easy. Alt+F4 and pick your option if you're on desktop is the fastest way. In Metro/Modern/Whatever it's Win+C, Power, then choose your option. Similar to how it was before...which was Start, click the arrow, choose your option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Defcon    394

Here's a hint - if you have to present arcane shortcuts and gestures as 'fixes' or talk about 'X is easy to do. Just do this' or 'Y isn't a big deal, you can always to this instead', that means the OS is not usable and not well designed.

Normal people don't know keyboard shortcuts and they don't expect to fumble around rediscovering half the OS just because it was not designed for them, and everyone is expected to buy a touchscreen monitor to make any sense of the OS.

Don't attack the author, don't use the usual 'You hate change, go back to Win 7'. This is far from an isolated complaint, in fact this will be the reaction of nearly every non-techie user. There's almost nothing in Win 8 that's actually easier to do or more intuitive than in Win 7 if you exclude touch.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joswin    25
Personally, though, I have a hunch that you'll see the old, "classic" desktop blown away in favor of a new Metro one, with old "classic" apps running in a virtualized subset similar to how XP Mode works today.

When that day comes I will no longer be using Windows (and that's not an over dramatization, I just wont). I cannot imagine Metro in any productive sense (at least not on a desktop). Personally I like simplicity but I really do hate this degradation of the UI experience. Its minimal for the sake of being minimal. We have spent years getting to the point of Windows 7, now its all been thrown away in favour of flat mono coloured icons/flat boxs and wasted space. I cannot get my head around it. I just installed Office 2013 today, and I just held my head in my hand and sighed. Is that the future? It's hideous.

The nicest thing I have found so far with Metro apps is that I can dock them, so things like messenger work quite well for that. But as the article mentions the core apps are missing functionality. Messenger is a primary example, for one I cannot sign out of the bloody thing.... ever (If there is a way someone please tell me!!). Which means (amongst other things) if I run the WLM desktop app (because the metro app has no support for Webcam or image sharing) I see the messages in the Windows Messenger App and in a notification for the Metro Messenger. Trying to contact someone boots you to People which (if you have linked with Facebook and Twitter) provides you a huge list of nonsense.

There are some nice desktop enhancements. Task manager is very sexy. File transfer looks great (other than the replace file dialog). The reduced shadows on Windows is perfect! The removal of Aero glass I don't mind, makes things cleaner. There are many things on the desktop I like and the reason I continue to use it, but there are also things that (some mentioned above) are starting to make me question if this is how I want my Windows experience to be - from here on out.

My biggest gripe at the moment is that I feel that I am having to 'work around' the OS instead of 'with' it. It's the return of desktop icons, and keyboard shortcuts. Never in my life have I had to resort to so much keyboard shortcutery (yes I just made up a word :rofl: ). Is this the mark of a well designed user experience Microsoft? Is it? :/

In Metro/Modern/Whatever it's Win+C, Power, then choose your option. Similar to how it was before...which was Start, click the arrow, choose your option.

Try Win + I. Much quicker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shane Nokes    739

Here's a hint - if you have to present arcane shortcuts and gestures as 'fixes' or talk about 'X is easy to do. Just do this' or 'Y isn't a big deal, you can always to this instead', that means the OS is not usable and not well designed.

Normal people don't know keyboard shortcuts and they don't expect to fumble around rediscovering half the OS just because it was not designed for them, and everyone is expected to buy a touchscreen monitor to make any sense of the OS.

Don't attack the author, don't use the usual 'You hate change, go back to Win 7'. This is far from an isolated complaint, in fact this will be the reaction of nearly every non-techie user. There's almost nothing in Win 8 that's actually easier to do or more intuitive than in Win 7 if you exclude touch.

A lot of people couldn't figure out how to use the start button when it came out either...even with a big animation that bounced telling them to click it to start...and the mouse was ridiculed as a stupid invention that would never go anywhere, by some of the biggest names in the tech world. The GUI was a joke that was never going anywhere...

Just because some people don't like change doesn't mean that the whole world should stop just for them. Change is going to happen.

I for one am glad that I have a smartphone, a PC, and various other pieces of technology that evolve over time and gain new ways of interacting.

If people don't like it...then yes they actually are free to keep using what they are already using. There's nothing wrong with that. If they don't want change...they don't have to change. That's the awesome thing about choice...

Those of us who like that things change over time have an OS that has changed. Those who don't...can keep using what they have been using.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PsYcHoKiLLa    2,288

I take it the guy has no access whatsoever to Google? Cos if you google "Windows 8 power metro shortcuts" gives you this :

http://wall.jaysonragasa.net/wall/post/2012/06/17/Windows-8-System-Power-Shortcuts.aspx

It's what I'm using, I have nice metro tiles shortcuts on my start page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix    7,414

Here's a hint - if you have to present arcane shortcuts and gestures as 'fixes' or talk about 'X is easy to do. Just do this' or 'Y isn't a big deal, you can always to this instead', that means the OS is not usable and not well designed.

How so? Keyboard shortcuts have been an integral part of any OS for years now. How does Windows 8 making use of them change this? To use the hardware power buttons instead of OS ones is the new way of doing things. These shortcuts exist for a reason. Take advantage of them. If you expect to be mousing around computers for the rest of forever, that's not going to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.