Spill a lot? NeverWet's ready to coat your gear


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Lingwo

That was really cool. I'm still trying to believe this isn't some old April Fools video that has been caught by a gullible journalist :laugh:

I want to spray my dog with it. The weather at the moment, he doesn't stay out the sea. If i could spray him with this, he'd never wreck the house when he comes in wet.

 

I don't know if it is mentioned in the video or article but how long does a coat last? If it could last a long time. Imagine having it on cars. Never would they rust again.

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sc302

No one has a definite answer to the question of how long does it last.

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Hum

I'm spraying this on the mattress of my bed-wetting son ... :wacko:

post-37120-0-78777300-1371656474.jpg

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sc302

Just remember if you have a fan that poop keeps hitting, never wet the room.

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V-Tech

Doubt it's real.

 

He didnt show how to spray the iPhone for example... Then when he took the iPhone out of the water, the water didnt slide from the phone, he needed to dry it with a towel....

 

I donno about it.

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sc302

Doubt it's real.

 

He didnt show how to spray the iPhone for example... Then when he took the iPhone out of the water, the water didnt slide from the phone, he needed to dry it with a towel....

 

I donno about it.

At 3:24 he explains how to protect the iphone.  But curious without any obvious cut scenes and what looks to be the submerged phone without a protective covering like a lifeproof case, it very much looks to be a working product.  You know someone is going to youtube this once they get their hands on it to prove it right or wrong.

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Haggis

this stuff looks awesome

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JonnyLH

Mind blown. Can we haz in UK?

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V-Tech

At 3:24 he explains how to protect the iphone.

 

I did see it and i saw the whole video. I mean he didnt spray anything on the outside of the phone? Only inside?

Maybe......

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Lingwo

Well the outside doesn't need spraying. The components are the things that need protecting from water.

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Louisifer

If it is real, I could do with some on my glasses!

 

Heavy rain can be annoying when all you see is droplets sticking to the lens :(

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Brandon H

Doubt it's real.

 

He didnt show how to spray the iPhone for example... Then when he took the iPhone out of the water, the water didnt slide from the phone, he needed to dry it with a towel....

 

I donno about it.

it wasn't put on the front or the back, only the inside of the iphone and the front speaker and jacks on the bottom

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Azies

At 3:24 he explains how to protect the iphone.  But curious without any obvious cut scenes and what looks to be the submerged phone without a protective covering like a lifeproof case, it very much looks to be a working product.  You know someone is going to youtube this once they get their hands on it to prove it right or wrong.

 

Yeah I wouldn't protect electronics and stuff with this, but I am going to get it and apply it to a new pair of shoes when I buy them.

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+warwagon

If you put this on your cloths then how do they get clean in the washer?

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Brandon H

If you put this on your cloths then how do they get clean in the washer?

easy, don't put it on your cloths. i'm pretty sure that was done just for the sake of demonstration

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Hum

Kitty approves !

post-37120-0-23983900-1371660677.jpg

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sc302

If you put this on your cloths then how do they get clean in the washer?

If you put it on your clothes, then they wouldn't get dirty would they?  sweat would roll off, pee would roll off, poop would roll off, dirt would roll off, etc....you assume that dirt would get aborbed as it does now and would need a cleaning to get the dirt and sweat out.

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Hum

^ The sweat won't be absorbed -- just roll uncomfortably down your body. :p

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sc302

^No it will just get re absorbed by the skin, creating pimples where you don't want them to be.

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techbeck

Coming to porn theaters near you....

 

I have seen something like this for the phone demoed a while ago.  Forget the name of the product, but it was demoed at some tech show.

 

Found it...liquipel

 

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Crisp
Spill a lot? NeverWet's ready to coat your gear

Waterproof and water-resistant products have nothing on NeverWet. The superhydrophobic coating, now available in stores, repels liquids like you've never seen before.

 

Screen_Shot_2013-06-19_at_1.44.29_PM_610

Chocolate syrup glides off a shoe coated with NeverWet. (Credit: Screenshot by Christopher MacManus/CNET)

 

Imagine spilling red wine or chocolate syrup on your shirt, only to watch it glide off as if nothing ever happened in the first place. Hogwash? No, it's called NeverWet.

 

Awhile back, I wrote about NeverWet, a superhydrophobic coating that can be applied to nearly any surface and repels liquids startlingly well. To bring NeverWet to the masses, developer Ross Nanotechnology licensed the product to Rust-Oleum, which recently started selling the spray for $19.97 at Home Depot.

 

 

The NeverWet package contains two cans -- a base and top coat -- capable of covering 10 to 15 square feet with water-repelling action on a multitude of surfaces including metal, wood, fabric, and plastic. The base coat takes about 30 minutes to dry, and the top coat takes another 30 minutes to cure.

 

Unfortunately, it's not wise to use NeverWet on transparent surfaces like glass, as the spray dries with a frosted appearance. A clear-drying version is in the works, according to a NeverWet representative that spoke with Lancaster Online.

 

 

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Marshall

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