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+Audioboxer

kNqvVCd.png

 

Frustrated it got delayed in the first place, wanted what it promised at launch, but from recent times it DEFINITELY needed to be and I'm glad the overall product now seems like it will be what was first invisioned.

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Andrew

I'm out of the loop here, but do we still get the PS+ at launch?

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+Audioboxer

I'm out of the loop here, but do we still get the PS+ at launch?

 

Yeah, think this video is still the most up to date with facts

 

 

edit: Besides the active PS+ comment, they later went back on that after outrage (as in if you upgrade the PS+ edition to full, it then doesn't require PS+ anymore).

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Andrew

Yeah, think this video is still the most up to date with facts

 

 

edit: Besides the active PS+ comment, they later went back on that after outrage (as in if you upgrade the PS+ edition to full, it then doesn't require PS+ anymore).

 

Yeah I was puzzled why that was still in there. Had to double check they didn't flip flop on it again :laugh:

 

Makes the digital version $10 cheaper. Will put it through it's paces before pulling out the wallet. Pretty picky over my racers but so far I've liked what they shown.

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+Audioboxer

Yeah I was puzzled why that was still in there. Had to double check they didn't flip flop on it again :laugh:

 

Makes the digital version $10 cheaper. Will put it through it's paces before pulling out the wallet. Pretty picky over my racers but so far I've liked what they shown.

 

It's because the video is 4 months old - Don't think they've released a newer one.

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+Audioboxer

Good idea to make the tracks free, that way there is no split userbase online. If they stick to cars and other things fine with me.

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+Audioboxer

Must watch video for weather effects, crazy

 

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MistaT40

Already pre-ordered......pretty excited about the clubs and being able to race as a team

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+Audioboxer

It's the small things that a new gen brings graphically that make you smile, interior dash reflections on window :)

 

gif_gifsicle_30_98ca4xwagv.gif

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shastasheen

The gameplay looks great. The UI is bad, almost as bad as the mess in GT5. Hopefully it doesn't have the dead feeling GT5 did. Never played GT6 but heard it was a big improvement.

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neo1911

It's the small things that a new gen brings graphically that make you smile, interior dash reflections on window :)

 

gif_gifsicle_30_98ca4xwagv.gif

Is that gif from Drive Club?

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DirtyLarry

New Action Trailer. I said damn.

 

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+Ryster

Dual language press conferences... hate them.

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Astra.Xtreme

The graphics definitely look really nice, but the gameplay looks a little iffy (from that video).  Hopefully there are damage/realism options to adjust.  Being able to slam into your opponents to "help" decelerate into corners is really stupid.

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DirtyLarry

The graphics definitely look really nice, but the gameplay looks a little iffy (from that video).  Hopefully there are damage/realism options to adjust.  Being able to slam into your opponents to "help" decelerate into corners is really stupid.

I do not see anything at all along the lines of what you are talking about at all. Someone intentionally slamming into the opponent to decelerate? Where is that exactly? I see one instance of a car slamming into another car, and that car flips over. I see no other instance of a car slamming into another car anywhere else in that video?

Besides the fact I do not even see what you are seeing, let's pretend I did, what exactly is supposed to happen when one car hits another? It is supposed to keep going the same exact speed it was? Cars slow down if they hit another car. That is what happens.

The truth is though all of the above seems pretty irrelevant to me and actually comes off as nitpicking, as the truth of the matter is it is damn near impossible to judge the actual gameplay of a driving game until you actually play it.

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Astra.Xtreme

I do not see anything at all along the lines of what you are talking about at all. Someone intentionally slamming into the opponent to decelerate? Where is that exactly? I see one instance of a car slamming into another car, and that car flips over. I see no other instance of a car slamming into another car anywhere else in that video?

Besides the fact I do not even see what you are seeing, let's pretend I did, what exactly is supposed to happen when one car hits another? It is supposed to keep going the same exact speed it was? Cars slow down if they hit another car. That is what happens.

The truth is though all of the above seems pretty irrelevant to me and actually comes off as nitpicking, as the truth of the matter is it is damn near impossible to judge the actual gameplay of a driving game until you actually play it.

Maybe you're not looking at the same video as I was:

 

See 10:15 and 10:32. All you'd have to do in this game is mash the gas pedal and then slam into the back of your opponents to catch up and make it through the corner.  That's absolutely terrible physics.  I can understand damage being turned off, but the other cars don't budge one bit and your car stays perfectly stable.  That just screams arcade mediocrity.  Since these are in-game videos, we can absolutely judge the actual gameplay.  The graphics look great, but the physics and it being 30fps doesn't give me high hopes for this.

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Polonium

Slamming down accelerate and hoping for the best isn't in this game. If you did some reading, you'd know that.

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Astra.Xtreme

Slamming down accelerate and hoping for the best isn't in this game. If you did some reading, you'd know that.

Did you not watch the video?...  :/

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DirtyLarry

Maybe you're not looking at the same video as I was:

 

See 10:15 and 10:32. All you'd have to do in this game is mash the gas pedal and then slam into the back of your opponents to catch up and make it through the corner.  That's absolutely terrible physics.  I can understand damage being turned off, but the other cars don't budge one bit and your car stays perfectly stable.  That just screams arcade mediocrity.  Since these are in-game videos, we can absolutely judge the actual gameplay.  The graphics look great, but the physics and it being 30fps doesn't give me high hopes for this.

I posted a video two hours before you posted your reply so yeah, I thought you were talking about the video I posted.

 

With that said, not sure how or why you think super realistic physics would even be applicable to this game. It has never been touted or marketed as such. In fact they have stated for quite some time the game sits between simulation and arcade.

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+Audioboxer

Hitting opponents gives you points based penalties, which in return will affect you and your club from levelling up as quickly.

Play bumper cars if you'd like but it will seriously affect your score. Coming first in driveclub isn't always the most important thing.

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Alwaysonacoffebreak

Free DLC? Haven't heard those two words in the same sentence for a long long time.

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DirtyLarry

This is the first game I have ordered digitally this current gen. That $10 discount was too good to pass up, and there is one genre of games I never trade in, and that is racing games.

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Polonium

I did, but as neither of us have played it and people that have said you can't - I believe them.

Hate on it if you want, but why not try it first ... if you can race around with no need to brake, then come back and slate it.

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