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Miscellaneous Launches and Payloads (updates)

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Draggendrop    5,747
Quote

The launch of the Soyuz-St-B launcher with the meteorological spacecraft took place at the cosmodrome of the Guiana Space Center #MetOpC. The launch is scheduled for November 7 at 03:47 Moscow time.

https://twitter.com/roscosmos/status/1058629727710257153

 

  

 

Quote

Nov. 6/7   Soyuz • MetOp C

 

Launch time: 0047:27 GMT on 7th (7:47:27 p.m. EST on 6th)


Launch site: ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana

 

An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS19, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry the MetOp C polar-orbiting weather satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, or Eumetsat. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 18. [July 3]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

This will be #3 since MS-10....should be all sorted now.

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Draggendrop    5,747

#2 since MS-10...

 

The Soyuz-2.1b rocket with the Glonass-M satellite launched from Plesetsk

 

Quote

MOSCOW, November 3. / Tass /. The Soyuz-2.1b launch vehicle with the Glonass-M navigation satellite launched from the Plesetsk cosmodrome. This was reported to journalists on Saturday at the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation.


"On Saturday, November 3, at 23:17 Moscow time, a successful launch of the Soyuz-2.1b medium-class launch vehicle with navigation spacecraft "Glonass-M", - reported in the department.

https://tass.ru/kosmos/5754522

 

4854788.thumb.jpg.5683bfd8dec44b65c583d27751f655e9.jpg

© Sergey Medvedev / TASS

 

----------------------------------------

 

Quote

MISSION SUCCESS: Russian military confirms a successful deployment of #GLONASS-M satellite at the conclusion of today's #Soyuz rocket mission: http://www.russianspaceweb.com/GLONASS-M-57.html …

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1058871738396745733

 

DrHcCtnXQAANb0p.thumb.jpg.edd1547147b8f3f4ac7fdc255cb691e0.jpg

 

---------------------------------------------

 

NASA to Hold Launch Readiness Review for ICON

 

Quote

NASA and Northrop Grumman will hold a Launch Readiness Review early next week at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to ensure preparations are continuing on track for the launch of the agency’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, satellite.

 

ICON will be launched by Northrop Grumman’s Pegasus XL rocket which will be carried aloft by the L-1011 Stargazer aircraft taking off from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

 

The ICON satellite mission is expected to launch no earlier than Wednesday, Nov. 7 with a 90-minute launch window opening at 3 a.m. EST. Release from the Stargazer is anticipated for 3:05 a.m. ICON is designed to study the dynamic zone high in the atmosphere where terrestrial weather from below meets space weather from above.

Follow the prelaunch coverage and the launch on NASA Television at:


https://www.nasa.gov/live

Tuesday, Nov. 6
3 p.m. – NASA EDGE webcast from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station will discuss ICON spacecraft operations, science and engineering, as well as launch processing of the Northrop Grumman L-1011 Stargazer with the Pegasus rocket.

 

Wednesday, Nov. 7
2:45 a.m. – Launch coverage begins at 2:45 a.m.

 

Learn more about NASA’s ICON mission at:
https://www.nasa.gov/icon

https://blogs.nasa.gov/icon/2018/11/01/nasa-to-hold-launch-readiness-review-for-icon/?fbclid=IwAR0ZPcXJTv9aJ1nTkg0wtgGqXwqL1vns6mYCp7UlAeKfqE6qGWuqsL-Z9uU

 

9a-NEW_ICON-Image_Portrait-082918a-Copy-1024x704.thumb.jpg.48663d0ae7fe4b109384b6b4d87e232f.jpg

image by NASA

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Draggendrop    5,747
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Start carrier rocket "Soyuz-ST-B" at the Guiana Space Center. The European meteorological spacecraft # MetOPS was launched into orbit

 

https://twitter.com/roscosmos/status/1060256275798331392

 

937819060_ArianespaceMetops6Nov2018.thumb.jpg.e203c5be48a0e888e91fb8f7e2dd95fb.jpg

 

larger image...

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DrbJPgCXgAE5AIb.jpg

 

#3 since MS-10....looking good.

 

This is one heck of an image for a Guiana Space Center Soyuz launch...well done.

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Draggendrop    5,747
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NASA and Northrop Grumman have postponed today’s launch attempt of NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, mission due to off-nominal data observed on the Pegasus XL rocket, during the captive carry flight. The L-1011 Stargazer carrier aircraft returned to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and the team will begin an investigation into the issue. The ICON spacecraft remains healthy. The team is evaluating the next launch attempt.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/icon/2018/11/07/icon-launch-update/

 

In flight anomaly found on the launcher...scrub.

 

Quote

No official word yet but it appears there won't be a Pegasus launch attempt tomorrow, and #NASAICON had to give up Eastern Range after that, so new target date TBD pending data review.

https://twitter.com/flatoday_jdean/status/1060292109016686592

 

looks like they need more time for analysis...TBD.

 

 

Quote

Have confirmed there will be NO #NASAICON launch attempt overnight tonight at 3 AM ET 11/8 on #PegasusXL air-launched rocket. NO new NET at this time as @northropgrumman & @Nasa team investigates/evaluates root cause continuing off nominal data signatures

 

https://twitter.com/ken_kremer/status/1060356310405992448

 

Edited by Draggendrop

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Beittil    575

Lol, ever since I started taking an interest in space flight and follow launches... I can't for the life of me remember one of these rockets ever being launched on the target date and without some form of issues. 

 

Seeing Orbital - > Orbital ATK - > Northrop struggle with this thing time and again. I hope the guys and girls over at Virgin Orbit know what they are dipping in to. Or StratoLaunch for that matter. 

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Draggendrop    5,747
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Rumors of Voyager 2's exit from the heliosphere have been greatly exaggerated. Check out the y-axis on this graph. It goes down to 19. We're waiting for a count of near zero heliospheric particles/sec before she's joined me in interstellar space. https://go.nasa.gov/2JThxXq

https://twitter.com/NASAVoyager/status/1060720885345079296

 

DrhuesTU0AUsZp8.thumb.jpg.a8c62ae248ad549a1c28b6da4864e954.jpg

 

https://voyager.gsfc.nasa.gov/_recent/v2la1.html

 

Patience "little one", almost there....  Voyager 1 made it. 

( Just like pets to me...😊)

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Next launch  line up....

 

Quote

Nov. 14  GSLV Mk.3 • GSAT 29

Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3), designated GSLV Mk.3-D2, will launch the GSAT 29 communications satellite carrying Ka-band, Ku-band and optical communications payloads. Delayed from July and October. [Oct. 31]

 

Nov. 15  Antares • NG-10

Launch time: 0949 GMT (4:49 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 11th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 10th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-10. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from March and Nov. 10. Moved forward from Nov. 17. [Oct. 14]

 

Nov. 15  Falcon 9 • Es’hail 2

Launch window: 2046-2229 GMT (3:46-5:29 p.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Es’hail 2 communications satellite. Built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp. and owned by Qatar’s national satellite communications company Es’hailSat, Es’hail 2 will provide television broadcasts, broadband connectivity and government services to Qatar and neighboring parts of the Middle East, North Africa and Europe. Es’hail 2 also carries the first amateur radio payload to fly in geostationary orbit. Delayed from August. Delayed from Nov. 14. [Nov. 7]

 

Nov. 16  Soyuz • Progress 71P

Launch time: 1814 GMT (1:14 p.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 71st Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Oct. 31. [Nov. 1]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

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Draggendrop    5,747
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Voyager 1 took this image of Saturn's rings and their shadows on the planet #OTD in 1980. The spacecraft had already made its closest pass to Saturn, and at this point was beginning its trip out of our solar system FOREVER. Find out Voyager 1's progress: https://go.nasa.gov/2Fei1Zu

https://twitter.com/NASAhistory/status/1062472679578632192

 

Dr6pRX0XcAAMemQ.jpg

 

sample from website...bit small here...use the link below for real time data...these puppies are moving.

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status/?utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=NASAhistory&utm_campaign=NASASocial&linkId=59484013

 

1242248658_VoyagersNov14snapshot.thumb.jpg.cc2d8adf1ec4777791677863af84ee56.jpg

 

 

DSN site ...sample...

https://eyes.jpl.nasa.gov/dsn/dsn.html

 

536545835_InsightNov14.thumb.jpg.ed623394b856855293ebb1bbf826adb1.jpg

 

 

Where are the Voyagers now?

 

Quote

Voyager 1 is in "Interstellar space" and Voyager 2 is currently in the "Heliosheath" -- the outermost layer of the heliosphere where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas. In the NASA Eyes on the Solar System app, you can see the real spacecraft trajectories of the Voyagers, which are updated every five minutes. Distance and velocities are updated in real-time. For a full 3D, immersive experience click on View Voyagers link below to launch the NASA Eyes on the Solar System app.

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status/?utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=NASAhistory&utm_campaign=NASASocial&linkId=59484013

 

 

NASA's Eyes

 

app download page

https://eyes.jpl.nasa.gov/eyes-on-voyager.html

 

Use expert mode and zoom out to view and select.

 

// Pioneer data...yes you may be curious after the zoom...

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/missions/archive/pioneer.html

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Draggendrop    5,747
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Nov. 14  GSLV Mk.3 • GSAT 29

 

Launch time: 1138 GMT (6:38 a.m. EST)


Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

 

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3), designated GSLV Mk.3-D2, will launch the GSAT 29 communications satellite carrying Ka-band, Ku-band and optical communications payloads. Delayed from July and October. [Nov. 13]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

 

 

live stream...

https://www.isro.gov.in/gslv-mk-iii-d2-gsat-29-mission/watch-live-launch-of-gslv-mkiii-d2-gsat-29-nov-14-2018-1645-hrs-ist

 

youtube channel...

 

around 45 minutes if all goes well...😎

Edited by Draggendrop
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Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

Watch live: India’s most powerful rocket poised for launch

 

Quote

The second orbital test flight of India’s GSLV Mk.3 launcher is set for Thursday, when it will hoist a high-throughput communications satellite into orbit to connect the county’s remote population and demonstrate new data relay capabilities.

 

Boosted by two powerful strap-on solid rocket motors, the nearly 143-foot-tall (43.5-meter) Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk.3 (GSLV Mk.3) is set for liftoff from the Second Launch Pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Center on India’s east coast at 1138 GMT (6:38 a.m. EST) Wednesday.

 

The launch is scheduled for 5:08 p.m. local time at the Indian spaceport.

 

It will be the third test flight of the GSLV Mk.3, India’s most powerful rocket, following a suborbital demonstration in 2014 and an orbital launch in 2017. Both missions were successful, and assuming Wednesday’s launch goes according to plan, the GSLV Mk.3 will be declared operational and Indian officials will approve plans to place the Chandrayaan 2 lunar lander on the rocket’s next flight as soon as January.

 

Indian space program managers earlier this year moved the Chandrayaan 2 launch from the less capable GSLV Mk.2 rocket to the GSLV Mk.3 to accommodate mass growth on the lunar mission.

 

“This mission is the second developmental flight of GSLV Mk.3, and this is an important mission for the GSLV Mk.3 program, as after the success of this mission, GSLV Mk.3 will be declared as operational and will join the group of operational vehicles PSLV and GSLV,” said K. Sivan, chairman of the Indian Space Research Organization.

Designed GSLV Mk.3-D2, Wednesday’s test flight will send the GSAT 29 communications satellite into an elliptical geostationary transfer orbit, on the way to a final position in geostationary orbit more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/11/14/gslv-mk3-d2-gsat-29/

 

same youtube as above but with scrolling updates.

 

approx 20 minutes...she's a biggy...should be fun.

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

Will have to wait for comm check, orbit raising and system checks.

 

They have the #2 heavy operational launcher until China launches the CZ-5 in January 2019 and it passes it's test. 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Final communication to Keplar...

 

 

///

 

2096634822_KeplerandTess.thumb.jpg.af872c35fe3f53040f1145303bf8eb91.jpg

Keplar and Tess on handover...😌

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

 

Launch Schedule...

 

Quote

Nov. 28  Falcon 9 • Spaceflight SSO-A

Launch time: 1831:47 GMT (1:31:47 p.m. EST; 10:31:47 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with Spaceflight’s SSO-A rideshare mission, a stack of satellites heading into sun-synchronous polar orbit. Numerous small payloads will be launched on this mission for nearly 50 government and commercial organizations from 16 countries, including the United States, Australia, Finland, Germany, Singapore and Thailand. Delayed from July. Delayed from Nov. 19. [Nov. 23]

 

Nov. 28/29  PSLV • HySIS

Launch time: Approx. 0400 GMT on 29th (11 p.m. EST on 28th)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C43 mission, will launch India’s Hyperspectral Imaging Satellite, or HySIS. A collection of small international secondary payloads will accompany HySIS on this launch. Delayed from October. Delayed from Nov. 26. [Nov. 24]

 

Late 2018  Long March 2D • SaudiSat 5A & 5B

Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Jiuquan, China

A Chinese Long March 2D rocket will launch the SaudiSat 5A and 5B Earth observation satellites for Saudi Arabia’s King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. [Oct. 25]

 

Quote

Dec. 3  Soyuz • ISS 57S

Launch time: 1131 GMT (6:31 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Nov. 6 and Nov. 15. Moved forward from Dec. 20 after Soyuz MS-10 launch abort. [Nov. 9]

 

Dec. 4  Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 16

Launch time: 1838 GMT (1:38 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 18th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 16th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16. Moved forward from Nov. 29. Delayed from Nov. 27. [Oct. 31]

 

Dec. 4  Ariane 5 • GSAT 11 & GEO-Kompsat 2A

Launch time: TBD
Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA246, to launch the GSAT 11 communications satellite and the GEO-Kompsat 2A weather satellite. GSAT 11 is owned by the Indian Space Research Organization and is based on a new Indian satellite bus. The spacecraft, fitted with Ku-band and Ka-band transponders, will be India’s heaviest communications satellite. GSAT 11 was originally scheduled to launch on an Ariane 5 mission in May 2018, but ISRO recalled the satellite from the launch base in French Guiana back to India for additional inspections after the in-orbit failure of another spacecraft. The GEO-Kompsat 2A satellite is South Korea’s first homemade geostationary weather satellite. Built in South Korea, the meteorological observatory will track storm systems in the Asia-Pacific region and monitor the space weather environment. [Oct. 25]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

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Draggendrop    5,747

New order...

 

Quote

Dec. 3   Soyuz • ISS 57S

Launch time: 1131 GMT (6:31 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Nov. 6 and Nov. 15. Moved forward from Dec. 20 after Soyuz MS-10 launch abort. [Nov. 9]

 

Dec. 3   Falcon 9 • Spaceflight SSO-A

Launch time: 1831:47 GMT (1:31:47 p.m. EST; 10:31:47 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with Spaceflight’s SSO-A rideshare mission, a stack of satellites heading into sun-synchronous polar orbit. Numerous small payloads will be launched on this mission for nearly 50 government and commercial organizations from 16 countries, including the United States, Australia, Finland, Germany, Singapore and Thailand. Delayed from July. Delayed from Nov. 19, Nov. 28, Dec. 1 and Dec. 2. [Dec. 2]

 

Dec. 4   Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 16

Launch time:  1838 GMT (1:38 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 18th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 16th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16. Moved forward from Nov. 29. Delayed from Nov. 27. [Oct. 31]

 

Dec. 4   Ariane 5 • GSAT 11 & GEO-Kompsat 2A

Launch window: 2037-2153 GMT (3:37-4:53 p.m. EST)
Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA246, to launch the GSAT 11 communications satellite and the GEO-Kompsat 2A weather satellite. GSAT 11 is owned by the Indian Space Research Organization and is based on a new Indian satellite bus. The spacecraft, fitted with Ku-band and Ka-band transponders, will be India’s heaviest communications satellite. GSAT 11 was originally scheduled to launch on an Ariane 5 mission in May 2018, but ISRO recalled the satellite from the launch base in French Guiana back to India for additional inspections after the in-orbit failure of another spacecraft. The GEO-Kompsat 2A satellite is South Korea’s first homemade geostationary weather satellite. Built in South Korea, the meteorological observatory will track storm systems in the Asia-Pacific region and monitor the space weather environment. [Dec. 2]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Beittil    575

 

Yay, Soyuz MS-11 didn't boomski...

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Draggendrop    5,747

Soyuz MS-11 launch

video is 5:55 min.

 

MS-11 launch in case video below is cranky

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNCkIBv9Nps

 

----------------------------

 

Quote

The way to the @Space_Station – check our launch timeline and follow every step, from launch to docking #SoyuzMS11 #Exp58

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/1069554942720000001

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DtfSFDtWsAAhY7K.jpg

 

----------------------------------

 

Quote

Congratulations to the Russian Space Agency @roscosmos and all international partners for a flawless launch of #SoyuzMS11. And welcome to space, @Astro_DavidS, @AstroAnnimal and Oleg! #Exp57 #Exp58 #Horizons

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/1069584125391224832

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DtftFuQW0AEH39u.jpg

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DtftFWEWsAArfwB.jpg

 

-------------------------------------

 

Quote

A baby dragon hugged by an elf - is the zero-g indicator, chosen by Lt. Col. Anne Charlotte McClain's son.

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1069553133699895297

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DtfQ4AZWwAAM800.jpg

 

---------------------

 

site is having issues showing video, images...and pretty much everything else other than text... 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Next up...

 

Quote

Dec. 4   Ariane 5 • GSAT 11 & GEO-Kompsat 2A

 

Launch window: 2037-2153 GMT (3:37-4:53 p.m. EST)


Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

 

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA246, to launch the GSAT 11 communications satellite and the GEO-Kompsat 2A weather satellite. GSAT 11 is owned by the Indian Space Research Organization and is based on a new Indian satellite bus. The spacecraft, fitted with Ku-band and Ka-band transponders, will be India’s heaviest communications satellite. GSAT 11 was originally scheduled to launch on an Ariane 5 mission in May 2018, but ISRO recalled the satellite from the launch base in French Guiana back to India for additional inspections after the in-orbit failure of another spacecraft. The GEO-Kompsat 2A satellite is South Korea’s first homemade geostationary weather satellite. Built in South Korea, the meteorological observatory will track storm systems in the Asia-Pacific region and monitor the space weather environment. [Dec. 2]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

You Tube link

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

Quote

arianespace

Published on Dec 4, 2018

SUBSCRIBE 12K

For its 10th launch of 2018, the sixth of the year using an Ariane 5 vehicle, Arianespace will serve the space ambitions of two leading agencies by orbiting GSAT-11 for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and GEO-KOMPSAT-2A for the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI)

video is 43 seconds...lift-off  

 

14 minutes in...142 Km up and 3863 Km down range at 7.78 Km/s

 

check out the faring flex...

 

 

 

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

Next up...

 

Quote

Dec. 5   Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 16

Launch time: 1816 GMT (1:16 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 18th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 16th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16. Moved forward from Nov. 29. Delayed from Nov. 27 and Dec. 4. [Dec. 3]

 

Dec. 7   Long March 3B • Chang’e 4

Launch time: Approx. 1830 GMT (1:30 p.m. EST)
Launch site: Xichang, China

A Chinese Long March 3B rocket will launch the Chang’e 4 mission to attempt the first robotic landing on the far side of the moon. Chang’e 4 consists of a stationary lander and a mobile rover. [Dec. 2]

 

Dec. 7/8   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: 0419 GMT on 8th (11:19 p.m. EST; 8:19 p.m. PST on 7th)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. [Dec. 2]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

I'll dig around for a "viewing" outlet for Chang'e4... this is really cool...nice to get back to the moon...and the far side to boot....fingers crossed...

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Jim K    13,480

 

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

Can't wait....far side of the moon...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Draggendrop

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Draggendrop    5,747

 

Schedule....

 

Quote

Dec. 8/9   Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71

Launch time: 0406 GMT on 9th (11:06 p.m. EST; 8:06 p.m. PST on 8th)
Launch site: SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. [Dec. 7]

 

Dec. 12/13   Electron • VCLS 1

Launch window: 0400-0800 GMT on 13th (11:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m. EST on 12th/13th)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its fourth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The mission will be conducted under contract to NASA’s Venture Class Launch Services Program, carrying 10 CubeSats to orbit for NASA field centers and U.S. educational institutions. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and Dec. 10. [Dec. 7]

 

Dec. 18   Falcon 9 • GPS 3-01

Launch time: Approx. 1424-1450 GMT (9:24-9:50 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. Delayed from May 3 and late 2017. Switched from a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket. The second GPS 3-series satellite will now launch on a Delta 4. Delayed from September and October. Delayed from Dec. 15. [Nov. 21]

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

 

 

Live Launch Broadcast: Delta IV NROL-71

 

 

Coverage begins prior to 11:00 pm EST (04:00 GMT)

 

 

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DocM    16,543

WOW!!!

 

 

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Jim K    13,480
Quote

NASA’s Voyager 2 Probe Enters Interstellar Space

 

For the second time in history, a human-made object has reached the space between the stars. NASA’s Voyager 2 probe now has exited the heliosphere – the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun.

 

Members of NASA’s Voyager team will discuss the findings at a news conference at 11 a.m. EST (8 a.m. PST) today at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Washington. The news conference will stream live on the agency’s website.

 

Comparing data from different instruments aboard the trailblazing spacecraft, mission scientists determined the probe crossed the outer edge of the heliosphere on Nov. 5. This boundary, called the heliopause, is where the tenuous, hot solar wind meets the cold, dense interstellar medium. Its twin, Voyager 1, crossed this boundary in 2012, but Voyager 2 carries a working instrument that will provide first-of-its-kind observations of the nature of this gateway into interstellar space.

 

Voyager 2 now is slightly more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from Earth. Mission operators still can communicate with Voyager 2 as it enters this new phase of its journey, but information – moving at the speed of light – takes about 16.5 hours to travel from the spacecraft to Earth. By comparison, light traveling from the Sun takes about eight minutes to reach Earth.

 

The most compelling evidence of Voyager 2’s exit from the heliosphere came from its onboard Plasma Science Experiment (PLS), an instrument that stopped working on Voyager 1 in 1980, long before that probe crossed the heliopause. Until recently, the space surrounding Voyager 2 was filled predominantly with plasma flowing out from our Sun. This outflow, called the solar wind, creates a bubble – the heliosphere – that envelopes the planets in our solar system. The PLS uses the electrical current of the plasma to detect the speed, density, temperature, pressure and flux of the solar wind. The PLS aboard Voyager 2 observed a steep decline in the speed of the solar wind particles on Nov. 5. Since that date, the plasma instrument has observed no solar wind flow in the environment around Voyager 2, which makes mission scientists confident the probe has left the heliosphere.

 

//

 

Full article at NASA

 

 

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