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Andrew

Title updated / Topics merged

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MightyJordan

Death threats because someone delayed a game instead of rushing it out in an unfinished state? I've seen everything now.

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soniqstylz
13 hours ago, MightyJordan said:
 

Death threats because someone delayed a game instead of rushing it out in an unfinished state? I've seen everything now.

Death threats because someone correctly reported that a game was delayed...   smdh


https://twitter.com/jasonschreier/status/736151267215560705

 

Link posted instead of tweet because of a screenshot using the 'f' word, trying to stay w/in Neowin rules.

 

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MightyJordan
14 minutes ago, soniqstylz said:

Death threats because someone correctly reported that a game was delayed...   smdh

Yeah, I posted that on the first page. 

 

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DirtyLarry

I loved both Joe Dangers. Truly loved them. In fact I created threads (first one was merged, and the second thread was not) on these forums when both games first released professing how much I enjoyed them.

 

So naturally when I saw that the developer Helios Games was releasing a new game I was on board. Then I saw it was No Man's Sky, and my excitement quickly dissipated. See I have a pretty simple rule with video games that has always served my personal taste pretty damn well. If a game has no end, I do not play it. That may sound silly to a lot of people that read it, but it is true. If a game has no end (unless it is a MP game with rounds), I do not play it. I like knowing their is an end goal.

 

So that is why I lost a lot of interest in NMS. This endless exploration aspect, while it sounds like an interesting premise, also does not interest me all that much.

 

Regardless because of my past respect for Helios, I will be checking this game out. But I do not expect it to be my type of game. And I also feel like both the gaming community and "media" have hyped this game up to a position it cannot possibly live up to. The expectations are out of this world. I hope for their sake they meet them, but it does appear to be less and less likely the more we learn, and that is a damn shame. As I am pretty damn positive the game is going to be very good. I just think it is not going to be as good as people expect it to be. Myself included.

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Gerowen

To be honest, I haven't really paid a whole lot of attention to this game, but after watching a couple videos for this game this evening, I'm REALLY excited to be running around in a massive procedurally generated universe, :-D

 

Just found this video interview of some guy who is either a tester or maybe a developer.

 

 

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soniqstylz
On 5/29/2016 at 11:36 PM, DirtyLarry said:

I loved both Joe Dangers. Truly loved them. In fact I created threads (first one was merged, and the second thread was not) on these forums when both games first released professing how much I enjoyed them.

 

So naturally when I saw that the developer Helios Games was releasing a new game I was on board. Then I saw it was No Man's Sky, and my excitement quickly dissipated. See I have a pretty simple rule with video games that has always served my personal taste pretty damn well. If a game has no end, I do not play it. That may sound silly to a lot of people that read it, but it is true. If a game has no end (unless it is a MP game with rounds), I do not play it. I like knowing their is an end goal.

 

So that is why I lost a lot of interest in NMS. This endless exploration aspect, while it sounds like an interesting premise, also does not interest me all that much.

 

Regardless because of my past respect for Helios, I will be checking this game out. But I do not expect it to be my type of game. And I also feel like both the gaming community and "media" have hyped this game up to a position it cannot possibly live up to. The expectations are out of this world. I hope for their sake they meet them, but it does appear to be less and less likely the more we learn, and that is a damn shame. As I am pretty damn positive the game is going to be very good. I just think it is not going to be as good as people expect it to be. Myself included.

1) It's Hello Games :p

 

2) Technically it has an end, the idea is to make it to the center of the universe.

 

BUT, I totally get what you're saying.  I feel like this game will be fun in the beginning, but after so many people have already found and explored stuff a few months in new players won't have the same wonder.  So get it at launch or don't bother.  Which makes me sad and is why I personally love SP games.

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Jim K

Could be delayed again ...

Quote

"No Man's Sky: Dutch-based company claims Hello Games used patented superformula to create game

 

No Man's Sky has had plenty of problems leading up to its release. The developers had their studio flooded on Christmas Eve of December 2013 (nearly again in January 2014), game was delayed, and then it was revealed that the developers at Hello Games had been having a secret lawsuit over the word 'Sky.'

 

According to a report from Telegraaf, a Dutch based company is claiming that Hello Games borrowed their "superformula" that allows the procedurally generated game to generate the world around them. This is despite the fact that the Dutch based company has not seen the games code, they have simply heard about the game.

 

"We haven't provided a license to Hello Games", states Jeroen Sparrow from the Dutch based company Genicap, who emphasizes that the licensing system is put in place to protect its customers. "We don't want to stop the launch, but if the formula is used we'll need to have a talk."

 

/snip

More at GameZone

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Vandalsquad
Quote

Genicap apparently hasn't seen the No Man's Sky source, which would seem to weaken the validity of its claim; however, creator Sean Murray acknowledged in a 2015 New Yorker interview that he had struggled with elements of procedural planetary generation, until he discovered an equation published in 2003 by Belgian plant geneticist Johan Gielis that he called “Superformula.” 

 

The interview portrays Superformula as integral to the viability of No Man's Sky. What it doesn't mention, perhaps because it didn't seem relevant at the time, is that Gielis is the Chief Research Officer at Genicap (and also a member of the board), and that he's held a patent on the formula for more than a decade. I'm not enough of a patent lawyer to say that constitutes a smoking gun, but it sure does sound like there may be a legitimate complaint here. 

Pcgamer

If that's the truth I'll agree with the side blocking the sale for once.

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wakjak
On 7/21/2016 at 5:38 AM, Vandalsquad said:

If that's the truth I'll agree with the side blocking the sale for once.

They don't want to block the sale of No Man's Sky, nor do they wish to disrupt the launch.

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+LostCat

I think I'm grabbing this guy after the reviews come out.  It's been pretty slow around here lately.

 

I can't say it's a title I've been incredibly excited about, but I was nonetheless interested and it looks pretty well done compared to most of the space genre.

 

Will it be?  I have no idea.

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Nick H.

I'm sat here while a friend plays this on the PS4. It's been quite slow going so far, although that's partly to do with the fact that my friend isn't normally a gamer so he gets disorientated, he forgets the controls, so on and so forth.

 

I think my biggest gripe at the second is that it feels very lonely. There are animals, starships occasionally fly overhead, but there is no real sense of civilization. Even arriving at the space station, you meet one Gek. I'm not saying that the whole universe should be bustling, but it seems bizarre that I'm out visiting these planets without any other humanoid interaction.

 

I can also see how it will get repetitive fast. We needed to fix the engine, so we went to collect some resources. Then we needed a hyperdrive, so we went to collect some resources. Granted, this is only the very beginning of the game, but hopefully there will be some more variation in objectives.

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+Asmodai

I got the game on Saturday and played it for a few hours.

 

I really enjoy it but I read a lot before it came out and so had a pretty good idea of what it was going to be.  I'm honestly a bit surprised about many of the things reviewers are complaining about because they've been stated by the developer from the start.

 

First let me make clear this is NOT a FPS where you run around and kill tons of aliens.  Likewise it is NOT a space ship sim where you fly around building a galactic trade/piracy empire.  Maybe you can do both of those things eventually but it's clearly not the point and the mechanics aren't great even if you managed to try those things.

 

It's very much a game about exploration and survival.  The survival elements are not so daunting that you're constantly struggling to get the resources you require to stay alive but it is there enough that you have to on occasion go get fuel for things.  You're cataloging new species, discovering new planets, etc. so there are no big cities, heck I'm surprised there is as much structures as there are.  The main things you do are:

 

1) collect resources to repair your stuff (you start with a busted ship as well as some of your non-survival related suit items broken)

2) continue collecting enough resources to keep your stuff fueled/repaired (both these first two are easy and don't consume a great deal of time)

3) discover new planets, flora, fauna, and relics to trade them in for money.

4) use money to upgrade ship, tool (gun/mining tool), and suit so you can go farther, to more dangerous places, faster.

5) also along the way you'll learn alien languages one word at a time which will help you when dealing with them and raise your standing with them.

 

That's pretty much it.  I find the game relaxing and a very enjoyable change of pace from running around and shooting everything in the face in other games.

You are unlikely to ever meet another player, while it's an online game in a shared universe there are literally 18 quintillion planets so your odds of running into someone else are extremely slim.  It's not an MMO where you hang out with your friends.  Apparently two people actually did run into each other on day one on the PS4 and the developers claim that due to extreme load on the server the things that were supposed to happen didn't.  Either due to bugs or server load or whatever the two players couldn't actually see each other despite being in the same place at the same time.  That issue should be resolved in the future though but again, it's unlikely to effect most people as you just aren't very likely to ever run into anyone else.

 

The biggest complaint I've heard from reviews and such is the inventory being limited.  This reminds me of when I had friends play an Elder Scrolls game for the first time and they went around picking up every fork and spoon in the game until they couldn't move.  I'm not going to say my inventory has never been full but if you just collect whatever you need for your next goal (and a stockpile of the few "fuel" elements) it really isn't much of a problem for me.  Also it's something that gets better with time as you prove your suit, ship, and tool you get more spaces for inventory/upgrades.  You absolutely can not run around and pick up every resource you come across just as you can't pick up every item you are able to in Elder Scrolls.  My play loop is:

 

1) Figure out my next goal (upgrade I want to craft for example) and what I need for it.

2) Gather the resources to make that one thing plus any "fuel" resources I find along the way.

3) Craft the goal item and repeat.

 

While doing those I keep an eye out for language trainers, new flora/fauna, crafting recipes and such.

 

Again it IS a very slow place exploratory game by design so if you go in expecting some great combat FPS or space ship sim you are going to be VERY disappointed.  Likewise if you're looking for some brutally hard survival sim where every minute is a struggle to stay alive it's not that either.  It's also not the grab every single thing you can type of game either.

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Emn1ty

Probably the only two real complaints I have about the game so far (aside from poor PC performance) is I feel inventories are too small (though upgrades will likely resolve this issue) and space is decidedly not empty in this game. I feel like everywhere I go in space is full to the brim with asteroids or something... and being someone very familiar with space this reminds me more of the Gummy Ship in Kingdom Hearts than a space exploration game. I really wish there was less "stuff" all over.

As for some stuff from my gameplay, found my first truly beautiful planet yesterday.
 

253Jnog.jpg

 

ZcExO12.jpg

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MightyJordan

 

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Emn1ty

I've been playing on and off again for an hour or two through the week, and so far I've not been disappointed with the game solely based on exploration. If you know much about chemistry and elements, some of the worlds have nice quirks about them that make them interesting. I was on a world which had Alkaline storms, which made me quite nervous to stay away from any water. Those who know what I mean have probably seen what results when Alkali's come in contact with H2O.

 

Have a few more screenshots for people to enjoy as well, figure I'll share the planets I find most visually interesting and memorable.

 

tjnHUca.jpg

U7Mux4O.jpg

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+Audioboxer

Major disappointment, will buy at bargain bin price.

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Emn1ty

Found an acid trip of a planet last night.

 

c3C0yde.jpg

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soniqstylz
4 hours ago, Emn1ty said:

Found an acid trip of a planet last night.

 

c3C0yde.jpg

Well-named planet

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Emn1ty
37 minutes ago, soniqstylz said:

Well-named planet

Unfortunately it doesn't really fit anywhere in the game, lol.

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dipsylalapo

So No Man's Sky is finally getting in multi platform release next week and just saw that Major Nelson shared a trailer. No Man's Sky NEXT. I think I missed the news about space battles and giant robots. 

 

 

For those that have already bought the game, what are you thoughts? Has the initial bad release put you off all together?

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+LostCat
2 minutes ago, dipsylalapo said:

For those that have already bought the game, what are you thoughts? Has the initial bad release put you off all together?

Actually I liked the game more than Elite: Dangerous, and I put a lot of time into that as well.

 

After a while the crafting tasks got a little overkill for me, but I still enjoy messing around in it.

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      Of course, if your budget allows you to splurge on any of the components, you could opt for higher specs in the processor, RAM, or GPU space. However, considering that many of the offerings are seeing discounts this week thanks to the Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals, it is best to act fast if you have an upgrade on the cards.

      Honorable mention
      Image credit: Amazon Lastly, though this is not part of the recommendation list for the sub-$1000 build, there is one good deal on gaming monitors for those of you interested. The 24-inch FullHD AOC 24G2 IPS gaming monitor is currently being offered for $237.49 on Amazon. The monitor is a great choice for 1080p gaming thanks to its 144Hz refresh rate, AMD FreeSync (G-SYNC works but non validated) support, and 1ms response time.

      As an Amazon Associate, Neowin may earn commission from qualifying purchases.

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Sony is permanently banning PS5 owners selling access to PlayStation Plus Collection
      by Usama Jawad

      A major advantage a PlayStation Plus subscription offers to new owners of the PlayStation 5 is immediate access to 20 high-quality PlayStation 4 games. Games such as Uncharted 4, Until Dawn, Bloodborne, God of War, and more are playable at no extra cost under the "PlayStation Plus Collection" umbrella. Once claimed, these games are playable across both the PlayStation 5 and the PlayStation 4. Now, Sony is permanently banning some PlayStation 5 owners for exploiting this offer.

      Citing several now-removed forum posts, GamerBraves claims that Sony is issuing permanent bans to PlayStation 5 owners who have been selling access to this collection of games. How this "exploit" works is that some PS5 owners create listings online for fees as low as $8 according to one Malaysian listing, and ask people to share their account credentials to gain access to the collection. Shared credentials can then be used to create an account on a PS5 which also gives that account instant access to the games on the originally associated PS4.

      Apart from the fact that this is an exploitative technique which Sony definitely does not want people to employ, the security implications of sharing account credentials with strangers on the internet are enormous.

      As such, Sony is handing out bans to players on both sides - sellers and buyers - for engaging in this practice. The report claims that sellers have been issued permanent bans while accounts of buyers have been banned for two months. An account ban entails losing access to all content tied to it, including games purchased using those credentials. For the selling parties, this means permanent loss while for people buying their services, this means that they will be able to access their content from the same account again after two months.

      Source: GamerBraves via Push Square

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Here's why FIFA 21 on PC will be inferior to PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S
      by Usama Jawad

      FIFA 21 launched on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC early last month and is scheduled to land on the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S on December 4. The launch will come as a free update to owners of the game on latest consoles and will pack several new features not available on previous consoles and PC. Now, the publisher has revealed why "next-gen" features won't be making their way to PC platforms.

      FIFA 21 on the latest game consoles includes features such as ball compression, a new camera angle, and muscle deformation. However, none of these will be making their way to the PC because EA wants to lower the barrier of entry in terms of specifications. In an interview with Eurogamer, Executive Producer Aaron McHardy had the following to say:

      Looking at the statement, one has to wonder why EA couldn't figure out some workaround to keep the gen five features as optional on PC so people with powerful rigs could utilize them while gamers on lower-end PCs can simply switch them off for increased performance.

      Given that the minimum requirements of the PC version are quite modest - requiring an Nvidia GTX 660 (2GB VRAM) or AMD Radeon HD 7850 (2GB VRAM), 8GB of RAM, and Intel Core i3-6100 or AMD Athlon X4 880K CPU - it definitely makes sense to not have "next-gen" capabilities on these machines. But ideally, there should have been an option to enable this for gamers on high-end machines.

      Source: Eurogamer