Double notifications


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Hey guys, i'm getting double notifications for quotes, exact same timeline, as you can see in the topic, game_over and Jundor, did not quote me twice.

 

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On 3/21/2017 at 11:40 AM, TAZMINATOR said:

No issues here... must be browser issue?

How could it be?

30 minutes ago, Draconian Guppy said:

+1 still happening

Yup. 

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Yeah, looks like double notifications only happens from comments/likes on the front page. Otherwise notifications of posts here on the forums (comments, likes, etc.) are not doubled.

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2 hours ago, Boo Berry said:

Yeah, looks like double notifications only happens from comments/likes on the front page. Otherwise notifications of posts here on the forums (comments, likes, etc.) are not doubled.

Yea, confirmed here to.  Only front page.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Confirmed :/ we had two places where we were doing the notification (custom plugin and IPB classes) we disabled our own custom one, but that didn't seem to help. @Redmak is aware of this.

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  • 3 weeks later...

And here I thought I was going crazy.   Hope it's fixed soon, at least it's limited to notification from the front page and not everything.

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57 minutes ago, Draconian Guppy said:

i've giving up basically :/ 

Ditto. Kinda ridiculous that it is still like this. 

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I'm getting it as well. Double notifications for front page comments. Not sure about likes, I ignore them.

 

Someone suggested it's a browser issue. Latest Chrome (I keep it up to date), Windows 7 Pro on one machine, Windows 10 Pro on another, but more likely the Win7 box. Chrome in both cases.

 

I'm not too bothered. I put up with it for however long before coming to this forum and found that a topic had already been made (not surprised) and decided to weigh in.

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3 hours ago, dragontology said:

I'm getting it as well. Double notifications for front page comments. Not sure about likes, I ignore them.

 

Someone suggested it's a browser issue. Latest Chrome (I keep it up to date), Windows 7 Pro on one machine, Windows 10 Pro on another, but more likely the Win7 box. Chrome in both cases.

 

I'm not too bothered. I put up with it for however long before coming to this forum and found that a topic had already been made (not surprised) and decided to weigh in.

It's not a browser issue.

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On 5/5/2017 at 9:31 AM, adrynalyne said:

It's not a browser issue.

Then tell the guy who suggested it was. I was merely being thorough; as, I assume, were you.

 

The notification that told me you quoted me didn't double, though I'm sure we established that it was front-page notifications only.

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