General Space Discussion (Thread 1)


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Unobscured Vision

:ermm: :hmmm: 🤨

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Draggendrop

7 months..pretty quick for government standards...reference the remote go-pro's for SpaceX.

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Draggendrop

We knew some support would be "delegated" to ensure Ariane 6 stability...

 

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Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland signed an agreement to use European launch vehicles for their institutional satellites. A win for Arianespace and the Ariane 6 rocket.

https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/status/1055428758872702978

 

 

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Ingenio, built by @AirbusSpace, is a Spanish govt optical reconnaissance satellite. It's part of a system that includes the Paz radar satellite, launched in Feb by @SpaceX.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/1055414049398312960

 

 

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Details presumably to come. For example, will Germany's commitment include military sats? Will @ASI_spazio never look at another @spaceX or @blueorigin or other non-EU rocket?

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/1055380455468527616

 

 

Appears to be "localized" government launches to appease their EU political football.

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Unobscured Vision

Yep. This needed to happen for the political "stuff" to get dealt with. Now things can finally move forward full-speed.

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DocM

Like SLS, A6 one is more a jobs program and govt. feel-good project.

 

They'd be better off supporting European small launcher development with seed money, smallsat launches and regulatory reform then let nature take its course.

 

At one time this would have been hard for startups, but with SpaceX, Rocket Lab etc. providing the strategic roadmap and 3D metal printing for engines...

Edited by DocM
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Unobscured Vision

I dunno. Europe needs it's own launch platform, and A5 is getting long in the tooth; so I can see them doing a big upgrade project to a new platform. As long as it's an actual upgrade.

 

We'll see where it goes. 😊

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DocM

It's clear A6 is a half-step, Arianespace has admitted it by starting a re-use progeam. They should have done that the day after the first Falcon 9 landed.

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Unobscured Vision

True, but they gotta start somewhere.

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DocM

RIP, Sir!

 

https://www.energia.ru/en/corporation/bio/vachnadze.html

>


He was directly involved in setting up production, developing manufacturing processes for our country's first long-range ballistic missiles and launch vehicles, our country's first unmanned spacecraft and satellites, space systems under programs of manned spacecraft Vostok, Voskhod, Soyuz, lunar programs L1 and N1-L3, programs of orbital stations Salyut, Mir, space upper stages Block D and DM, cargo spacecraft Progress. He was in charge of work on the development of reusable space system Energia-Buran. 
>

 

 

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Jim K

He's back (Hubble)

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope Returns to Science Operations

 

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope returned to normal operations late Friday, Oct. 26, and completed its first science observations on Saturday, Oct. 27 at 2:10 AM EDT. The observations were of the distant, star-forming galaxy DSF2237B-1-IR and were taken in infrared wavelengths with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument. The return to conducting science comes after successfully recovering a backup gyroscope, or gyro, that had replaced a failed gyro three weeks earlier.

 

A gyro is a device that measures the speed at which the spacecraft is turning, which is necessary to help Hubble turn and lock on to new targets. One of Hubble’s gyros failed on Oct. 5, and the spacecraft’s operations team activated a backup gyro the next day. However, the backup incorrectly returned rotation rates that were far in excess of the actual rates.

 

Last week the operations team commanded Hubble to perform numerous maneuvers, or turns, and switched the gyro between different operational modes, which successfully cleared what was believed to be blockage between components inside the gyro that produced the excessively high rate values. Next, the team monitored and tested the gyro with additional maneuvers to make sure that the gyro was stable. The team then installed additional safeguards on the spacecraft in case the excessive rate values return, although this is not anticipated.

 

On Thursday, the operations team conducted further maneuvers to collect gyro calibration data. On Friday, Hubble performed activities similar to science observations, including rotating to point at different sky locations, and locking on to test targets. The team completed all of these activities without issue.

 

Late Friday, the team began the process to restore the scientific instruments to standard operating status. Hubble successfully completed maneuvers to get on target for the first science observations, and the telescope collected its first science data since Oct. 5. 

 

Hubble is now back in its normal science operations mode with three fully functional gyros.  Originally required to last 15 years, Hubble has now been at the forefront of scientific discovery for more than 28 years. The team expects the telescope will continue to yield amazing discoveries well into the next decade, enabling it to work alongside the James Webb Space Telescope.

NASA

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Draggendrop

Maritime Launch Services Releases Spaceport Animation

 

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The animation, set with local music, guides the user through the various proposed facilities including the integration of payload on the Ukrainian Cyclone 4M rocket.

 

In August the province requested MLS conduct an additional focus report that would “examine potential impacts of the Project on: water resources, soil, air quality, noise flora and fauna, fish and fish habitat, protected areas and parks, dangerous good management, waste management, human health and contingency planning. The EA Administrator will provide you with written terms of reference for the preparation of the focus report within 25 days. Maritime Launch Services Ltd. will have up to one year to submit the required number of hard copies for distribution by the EA Branch, and an electronic copy of the focus report. The EA Branch will notify the public of the release of the focus report for review. There will be a 30-day public review period once the focus report has been released to the public.”

 

MLS is hoping to have the focus report completed and approved in time for a spring ground breaking.

https://www.spaceq.ca/maritime-launch-services-releases-spaceport-animation/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=297&v=XBzmrfpqlI0

 

 

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DocM

Hmmmm....

 

Sokath! His eyes uncovered!

 

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Draggendrop

Just saw this....

 

S7 Space to modernize Sea Launch floating spaceport for reusable rocket

 

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MOSCOW, November 7. /TASS/.

 

S7 Space plans to modernize the Sea Launch floating spaceport after switching to the launches of its reusable rocket from it, Company CEO Sergei Sopov told TASS on Wednesday.

 

"The spaceport will be modernized for the new carrier rocket," he said.

 

Today all the equipment on the command vessel and the launching platform has become obsolete, the chief executive said.

 

"It was developed 20 years ago. The platform’s remaining service life is another 25 years. Within this period, the launches of Zenit rockets that have been ordered and are in the process of production and also of our new carrier can be carried out," he said.

 

"The later we make the new carrier, the less time will be left for its operation from the Sea Launch platform," he pointed out.

 

"But, naturally, the spaceport’s service life, like the service life of any complex technical facility, can be considerably extended in case of its major repairs and modernization," the chief executive said.

 

S7 Space is considering several ways of recovering the first stage of its future reusable rocket after launch.

 

"On the list of likely options we have a hypersonic parachute capable of withstanding reentry heat, or special wings. We will make up our mind during the design phase as a result of more accurate calculations and research," he said.

In his opinion at this point it looks like a parachute system will be less costly.

 

"But if this solution is chosen, landing the re-entry stage safely on a small pre-prepared site will be a great problem due to strong side winds," Sopov said.

 

Non-reusable rockets have become uncompetitive and a private company has no chance to survive on the space launch market without reusable vehicles today, he said. 

 

"Without it [the reusable carrier], we simply won’t be able to survive on the commercial market. It is not even funny to compete with reusable and cheap offers entering the market with a non-reusable carrier," he said.

 

In the opinion of S7 Space chief, "a non-reusable rocket is as effective as a non-reusable aircraft."

 

"Creating a non-reusable carrier means not simply marking time but is a road backwards," Sopov said.

 

It is not a matter of the method of recovering the spent rocket stage but largely a matter of "its service life, in the first place, the cycles, the repairability and the labor intensity."

 

"Today all the rocket’s assemblies and systems [in Russia] are non-reusable, i.e. unfit for their repeat use," Sopov said.

 

more at the link...

http://tass.com/science/1029619

Excellent news....bold for the locale but bang on.....

 

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Draggendrop
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To mark what would have been Sagan's 84th birthday, the director of the #CarlSagan Institute @CSInst, @KalteneggerLisa, asks me to let you know that they have just released his lost 1994 lecture 'The Age of Exploration'

 

youtube link...

Carl Sagan's 1994 "Lost" Lecture: The Age of Exploration

video is 1 hr 36 min....just uploaded today

Carl Sagan Institute

Published on Nov 9, 2018

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_-jtyhAVTc

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Draggendrop

After  a memory jog with the above.....The  book introduction that knocked my socks off and still does.

 

"Carl Sagan (1934-1996) wrote this introduction for the first edition of ‘A Brief History of Time’, in 1988. Reprinted with permission of the Carl Sagan Estate"

 

Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time: Read the foreword by renowned astronomer Carl Sagan

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/stephen-hawking-a-brief-history-of-time-foreword-carl-sagan-astronomer-a8256241.html

 

A couple of minutes to read but visualize what he saw.....Carl at his best.

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Draggendrop

// Of topic...

 

#ArmisticeDay100

 

November 11th Remembrance day, Veterans day.

 

A thanks to all veterans past and present as well as those that support us...

 

39efc4dc1736ffdeff76fb720e95892f.thumb.jpg.5d673c095a44a481b958c145cf6cd95a.jpg

 

 

 

 

em583bed45.thumb.jpg.69be8c8c77d47cb40a6fd2d84f23f794.jpg

 

 

 

 

702323793_PowerfulMemorialDay017.thumb.jpg.c100691622ced58b0372468f9f3c4c5b.jpg

 

 

 

and for another day to remember, 2 days ago for it's anniversary...

 

5640e5f5bd86ef1d5d8bd421-1334-1001.thumb.jpg.b7a91674c88b7b0b8a9089213717ff2c.jpg

 

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Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Draggendrop

Back on topic....

 

HAL passed away.......

 

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"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that." RIP actor Douglas Rain, who provided the voice of HAL 9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The Shakespearean actor, a member of the Stratford Festival, was 90. Via Jeff Bond

https://twitter.com/MikeOkuda/status/1061759693771526144

 

 

Douglas Rain, Stratford Festival pioneer and voice of HAL, dead at 90

https://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/douglas-rain-stratford-dead-1.4901400

 

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Draggendrop
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In case there is any confusion, @NASA will NOT be retiring @NASA_SLS in 2022 or any foreseeable date. It is the backbone of America’s return to the Moon with international and commercial partners.

https://twitter.com/JimBridenstine/status/1064637713230512130

 

Appears the rocket mafia and Boeing may have lit up the phone board....must play the political game...while thinking..."why the hoot am I saying this ?"

 

Because..if true...they just lost the race...outright....well, it really was never a race. 

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Unobscured Vision

.... bleh ....

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DocM

Doesn't change the fact it's on the ground, or in space. SLS is a dinosaur looking for a time & place to rot into crude.

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