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New York parents win legal battle to evict son, 30

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shockz    5,718
8 hours ago, DocM said:

 

Born in 1949, and helped work the farm from the time I could walk. Drove a tractor at 7, drove a deuce and a half in the farm at 10. Had my "farm kids" driver permit at 12, licensed driver at 13.  Graduated & started college at 16.

 

Yeah, people like me have higher expectations of younguns and we produced productive offspring. Deal with it. 

Well gee. I was born in 1985, also drove a tractor at 7, worked on the farm for as long as I could remember, have a masters and moved out of my parents when I started college and now own my home (as in i do, and not the bank). Just like the majority of people my age did. Great Recession and all. Deal with it. 

 

If getting license is somehow (you mentioned it for basically the majority of how you describe yourself) those high expectations of yours, I can see how that negatively affects your view, as the younger part of my generation uses public transit, bikes or works close enough to walk. 

 

Not sure what else my generation has to do for those so called high expectations of yours. Seems you're blind or maybe even bitter to the fact that many of us have 6 figure salaries, paid their houses off, and are already saving for retirement. Not to mention help their parents by purchasing things and repairing their house, car, etc.. but yeah. Somehow because a few dummies post ridiculous about free college on social media or how this deadbeat gets an eviction, they've doomed us to be known as the entitlement generation. Please.

 

Edited by shockz
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DocM    16,536

I'm not talking about those who did, like us, or those who truly cannot for various reasons. l'm talking about the way too many today who won't.

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shockz    5,718
2 minutes ago, DocM said:

I'm not talking about those who did like us, or those who truly cannot for various reasons. l'm talking about the way too many today who won't.

And you being born in 1949, I'm sure you have quite a robust group of millennials you hangout with on a regular basis to form that opinion. 

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LostCat    1,302
6 minutes ago, DocM said:

I'm not talking about those who did, like us, or those who truly cannot for various reasons. l'm talking about the way too many today who won't.

There are several reasons I still live with my parent and, yes, it is partly laziness but partly neither of us really wants to live alone.  (I'm not millenial, but close.)

 

I tend to assume that most people who do either do pay rent or help out in other ways, making this a significantly less one sided arrangement than most people seem to think.

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DocM    16,536
Just now, shockz said:

And you being born in 1949, I'm sure you have quite a robust group of millennials you hangout with to form that opinion. 

Actually, yes, we do. Between our kids, their spouses & friends and our mixed age friends, neighbors, church members and their kids - way more than a few. Not all people over 50 curl up on the couch with a cat.

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shockz    5,718
23 minutes ago, DocM said:

Actually, yes, we do. Between our kids, their spouses & friends and our mixed age friends, neighbors, church members and their kids - way more than a few. Not all people over 50 curl up on the couch with a cat.

Ah so immediate family and then maybe a few other of their friends (and you forming your negative view off of said millennials is telling in it's own). That's definitely enough to make that "informed" opinion of yours.

 

On the other hand, I work with 4000 millennials (start up software company in the mid 90s to now a major player for jobs in our region), not to mention obviously my circle of friends are, and I see "us" a plenty outside of that basically anywhere in the city (and no, not homeless, drifters, beggars, etc...). I'll go with my view over your limited scope, which is well, wrong. Deal with it.

 

Speaking of which, my job hired on it's yearly summer interns who are currently either in college or just graduated high school, and I was blown away with how articulate, knowledgeable and mannered they were. It felt like I was working with a seasoned professional. Not exactly millennials, but the nonsense constantly spurred about how kids these days are wacko liberals who can't see past their phones, well, once again, that stereotype proves incorrect, unsurprisingly of course.

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satukoro    1,350
17 hours ago, shockz said:

*gasp* you mean he's not a millennial and he's like that? I think my brain just blue screened. 

In all fairness, the oldest millenials are now 36ish (early 80s to early 2k).

Seriously though, shameless people are shameless, no need to lump in twenty years worth of young adults and adults.

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Steven P.    13,822

Oh jeez people, lighten up will you? It was said in jest because it's obvious the guy is a mooch (his parent's actions speaks for itself). :rofl: 

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satukoro    1,350
45 minutes ago, shockz said:

Well gee. I was born in 1985, also drove a tractor at 7, worked on the farm for as long as I could remember, have a masters and moved out of my parents when I started college and now own my home (as in i do, and not the bank). Just like the majority of people my age did. Great Recession and all. Deal with it. 

 

If getting license is somehow (you mentioned it for basically the majority of how you describe yourself) those high expectations of yours, I can see how that negatively affects your view, as the younger part of my generation uses public transit, bikes or works close enough to walk. 

  

Not sure what else my generation has to do for those so called high expectations of yours. Seems you're blind or maybe even bitter to the fact that many of us have 6 figure salaries, paid their houses off, and are already saving for retirement. Not to mention help their parents by purchasing things and repairing their house, car, etc.. but yeah. Somehow because a few dummies post ridiculous about free college on social media or how this deadbeat gets an eviction, they've doomed us to be known as the entitlement generation. Please. 

  

Not to mention it was $45,000 per year for tuition at the college I attended as opposed to $600 per year forty years earlier.

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DocM    16,536
31 minutes ago, shockz said:

>

On the other hand, I work with 4000 millennials (start up software company in the mid 90s to now a major player for jobs in our region), not to mention obviously my circle of friends are, and I see "us" a plenty outside of that basically anywhere in the city (and no, not homeless, drifters, beggars, etc...). I'll go with my view over your limited scope, which is well, wrong. Deal with it.

>

 

Clearly your experience is with a group having a high proportion  of achievers, which is not what I was talking about.

 

Outside of your tech bubble is a different place, and my exposure to younger people isn't as limited as you think. 

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shockz    5,718
24 minutes ago, DocM said:

 

Clearly your experience is with a group having a high proportion  of achievers, which is not what I was talking about.

 

Outside of your tech bubble is a different place, and my exposure to younger people isn't as limited as you think. 

Hint: I'm the only person in my circle of friends who works in tech.

 

And my exposuse to people my age is obviously not limited either. You're wrong. Plain and simple.

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FloatingFatMan    18,654
1 hour ago, DocM said:

 my exposure to younger people isn't as limited as you think. 

 

59 minutes ago, shockz said:

And my exposuse to people my age is obviously not limited either. 

Both of you need to stop exposing yourself to young people, that's bad! :rofl:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Well, Steve P DID say to lighten up!!)

 

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Mindovermaster    2,145

I'm 32 and still live with my parents. But this is more a medical issue than just being a lazy bum. I haven't worked in 10 years because the medicine I take makes me drowsy. Try to work a job when you fall asleep during the day.

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adrynalyne    12,124
24 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

I'm 32 and still live with my parents. But this is more a medical issue than just being a lazy bum. I haven't worked in 10 years because the medicine I take makes me drowsy. Try to work a job when you fall asleep during the day.

I do it every day. I’m not minimizing your issues but my own medication does the same. 

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LostCat    1,302

Not exercising for 25 years or so made me drowsy heh.  trying to fix that :)

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sidroc    1,201
On 5/23/2018 at 7:59 PM, DocM said:

 

Born in 1949, and helped work the farm from the time I could walk. Drove a tractor at 7, drove a deuce and a half in the farm at 10. Had my "farm kids" driver permit at 12, licensed driver at 13.  Graduated & started college at 16.

 

Yeah, people like me have higher expectations of younguns and we produced productive offspring. Deal with it. 

Ancedotal stories mean nothing. They're plenty of kids who grew up this way that are millennials and plenty of moochers from all generations. I grew up around farm kids such as yourself that are millennials. I also don't believe the dynamic has changed much over the last 80 years as no one has shown me anything to state that. 

Edited by sidroc

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sidroc    1,201
14 hours ago, Mindovermaster said:

I'm 32 and still live with my parents. But this is more a medical issue than just being a lazy bum. I haven't worked in 10 years because the medicine I take makes me drowsy. Try to work a job when you fall asleep during the day.

I'm a nurse and have never heard of a medication that makes someone so drowsy they are disabled from working. Do tell, what is this medication? You are not on a low dose Versed, Propofol, or Ketamine drip are you? ?

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Mindovermaster    2,145
1 hour ago, sidroc said:

I'm a nurse and have never heard of a medication that makes someone so drowsy they are disabled from working. Do tell, what is this medication? You are not on a low dose Versed, Propofol, or Ketamine drip are you? ?

Lamotrigine Tablet is what makes me drowsy. 2nd side affect listed there. It is a medicine to help keep my seizures under check. I usually sleep in the afternoon hours. Totally out of my control. If I get a really bad headache, and need to lay down before my head loses it, I usually fall asleep.

 

Metoprolol Succinate also causes me drowsiness. Used to keep my blood pressure down. Probably doesn't affect me, as it is the lowest dosage, but still possible.

 

Also, I take a number of other meds. But those are the main 2.

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wakjak    17,922
On 5/24/2018 at 8:46 AM, DocM said:

I'm not talking about those who did, like us, or those who truly cannot for various reasons. l'm talking about the way too many today who won't.

And i'm 100% sure that your parents generation and grandparents said the same thing about you and your generation. It happens just the same now as then, with the same amount of lazy/entitled and what not. You just see more of it now because the internet exists to show it.

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DocM    16,536
8 hours ago, wakjak said:

And i'm 100% sure that your parents generation and grandparents said the same thing about you and your generation. It happens just the same now as then, with the same amount of lazy/entitled and what not. You just see more of it now because the internet exists to show it.

 

We didn't give the vast majority of parents reason to complain. There were a few staying home, but nothing like today.

 

In the 1960's about 62% of 18-34's were living independently, but today it's fallen to 31.6%. This is the first time in the modern era that this has happened.  (Pew Research, sourced from the US Census.)

 

There's even a term for it,

 

Boomerang Generation

 

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MtnDewCodeRedFreak    239
On 5/23/2018 at 7:59 PM, IbSta said:

Renting a 650 sq ft apartment for 2000$ a month

? (wide eyed) I just got my apt and it’s only 429 a month! The immediate vicinity is awesome - walking distance to a lot of places. ? (grin)

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sidroc    1,201
7 hours ago, DocM said:

 

We didn't give the vast majority of parents reason to complain. There were a few staying home, but nothing like today.

 

In the 1960's about 62% of 18-34's were living independently, but today it's fallen to 31.6%. This is the first time in the modern era that this has happened.  (Pew Research, sourced from the US Census.)

 

There's even a term for it,

 

Boomerang Generation

 

That's quite selective of you. You probobly didn't bother to look farther in to your numbers in your haste to attack millennials from Pew on that study. 

 

 



adults living with their parents was not at a record high in 2014. This arrangement peaked around 1940, when about 35% of the nation’s 18- to 34-year-olds lived with mom and/or dad (compared with 32% in 2014).

 

 

And

 

 



The share of young men with jobs peaked around 1960 at 84%. In 2014, only 71% of 18- to 34-year-old men were employed. Similarly with earnings, young men’s wages (after adjusting for inflation) have been on a downward trajectory since 1970 and fell significantly from 2000 to 2010. As wages have fallen, the share of young men living in the home of their parent(s) has risen.

 

 

 

Pew Source

 

But hey I am with you, when I am in my older years and feel like downing the next generation because I don't understand or like something about them I will definitely jump on the bandwagon of insulting them. Its been cool to do since Plato, why not do the same. 

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MtnDewCodeRedFreak    239
7 hours ago, DocM said:

 

Boomerang Generation

 

Like the cable TV channel lol. It’s a “spinoff” of Cartoon Network and it’s subscription based - old and not-so-politically-correct cartoons that today’s kids never get to watch like Animaniacs and Looney Tunes. I laughed for hours at those kinds when I was a kid - those cartoon characters (Bugs Bunny, etc) used weapons like mallets, explosives, falling anvils, etc. 

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sidroc    1,201
1 hour ago, MtnDewCodeRedFreak said:

Like the cable TV channel lol. It’s a “spinoff” of Cartoon Network and it’s subscription based - old and not-so-politically-correct cartoons that today’s kids never get to watch like Animaniacs and Looney Tunes. I laughed for hours at those kinds when I was a kid - those cartoon characters (Bugs Bunny, etc) used weapons like mallets, explosives, falling anvils, etc. 

They were politically correct then just as much as now, just on different subjects. In the 1950's there was such a stigma against sexuality that even married couples could not be shown sleeping in the same bed even if nothing was implied. "I Love Lucy" is a good example of this form of PC. The snowflake generation has always existed, what has changed is what causes an expression of outrage. 

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MtnDewCodeRedFreak    239
2 hours ago, sidroc said:

They were politically correct then just as much as now, just on different subjects. In the 1950's there was such a stigma against sexuality that even married couples could not be shown sleeping in the same bed even if nothing was implied. "I Love Lucy" is a good example of this form of PC. The snowflake generation has always existed, what has changed is what causes an expression of outrage. 

Yeah idiots get too butthurt nowadays. ?

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