SpaceX Super Heavy and Starship updates


Recommended Posts

DocM    16,975

Super Heavy's going to look NUTS!!

 

Peak Thunderbirds 😄

 

 

 

Edited by DocM
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,692

While funny-looking, that "wiggle" is critical for countering & dampening the cavitations that will occur when the engines first fire up and while they are in-use. Essential for stabilizing them. Most gimballed engines have such a method of dampening such forces. Even the SSME's did this.

 

Cool to see and I bet the response on these is very quick. :yes: 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

LabPadre webcast of tonight's hop test, assuming it isn't scrubbed too.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

SpaceX official webcast

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,692

It's live!

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

Aborted...venting

Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,692

Boy, did it. Wonder what went askew.

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

In previous new vehicle tests they set their limits too tight, causing frequent aborts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

They tried again tonight, but couldn't fit it in.

 

There's another road closing tomorrow, so...

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

So, the liquid nitrogen  superchilling system over-chilled the propellantss and....

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

😄😄😄

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

StarHopper hop after the CRS-18 launch (or scrub). 

 

Watch the SpaceX YouTube channel for a webcast link. If you're subscribed to SpaceXchannel you should get a notification.

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

StarHopper's T-0 is 2030 Eastern 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

 

 

Huge plume caused a grass fire

 

Screenshot_20190725-235958.thumb.jpg.cda2467c6cbec4dff6541cac76a9b317.jpg

Edited by DocM
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

Hop at about 01:18

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Beittil    584

Well, that's why they have their private squad of fire fighters... 

 

Haha, awesome... 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

@BocaChicaGal footage w/good audio.

 

Crank. It. UP!!

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Skiver    1,996

I'm looking forward to that 200m hop, hopefully we'll get to see her out of that shroud of smoke.

 

I know they're working on a lot more experience this time around, but can anyone measure their success with these tests against grasshoper? I was expecting a lot of problems and aborts before it got off the ground and back successfully so this seems to have gone amazingly well but not sure how quick they were with Grasshoper?

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

Grasshopper flew 8 times successfully before being retired. 1.8m, 5.4m, 40m, 80m, 250m, 325m, 250m, and finally 744m. She's now a trpphy at their  McGregor test facility.

 

F9R Dev-1 flew 4 times successfully, 250m - 1,000m, but a blocked engine sensor caused her to deviate from the planed trajectory then self-destruct during the 5th flight.

 

F9R Dev-2 never flew. 

 

Instead, SpaceX started a series of post-separation tests during real launches, perfecting supersonic retropropulsion and soft "landings" on the ocean.

 

You know the rest.

Edited by DocM
Link to post
Share on other sites
Beittil    584

The poor people at Spaceport America are still weeping over all the lost revenue when SpaceX did move to testing on live launches after mothballong Dev2. Lol

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

Yup, but if the damned thing's already up there after a launch so why use a single purpose vehicle based in the middle of nowhere?

 

Not to mention operational difficulties from being so close to White Sands (76 miles) and using their tracking.

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

Drone view

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

The crawler is prepping to move StarHopper back to the starting line. 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    16,975

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Ather Fawaz
      SpaceX reveals further details for its spaceport in Texas
      by Ather Fawaz

      Image via SpaceX(Twitter) Back in June, we received confirmation from SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk that the company is building a floating spaceport for space travel and hypersonic flights around the Earth. The floating spaceport would be built from refurbished oil platforms, will house a hyperloop for transportation to and from the land, and will be based in Boca Chica, Texas. Now, we have more details about the project.

      As spotted by Michael Sheetz (@thesheetztweetz) from CNBC, a new job posting by SpaceX for a 'Resort Development Manager' at Brownsville, Texas, deems the future spaceport at the Boca Chica Village in Texas as a "21st-century Spaceport” and the company’s first resort. Before enlisting the key responsibilities expected of a resort development manager, the company states:

      Judging from this and the fact that Starship is now the major focal point of SpaceX's efforts, development and construction for the spaceport have picked up the pace. Just recently, the SN5 prototype for Starship completed a liftoff and landing sequence as part of a test. Though Musk stated that it will be at least a further two to three years before any complete test flights commence.

    • By Ather Fawaz
      Starship SN7 prototype 'pops' during a cryogenic pressure test to failure
      by Ather Fawaz

      Image via NASASpaceFlight (livestream) Starship development has picked up pace in recent weeks. On Tuesday, June 23, SpaceX took the SN7 prototype's fuel tank for yet another test run. This time, it was the cryogenic pressure test to failure in Boca Chica, Texas (via Space.com).

      The test began by filling the fuel tank with super-chilled liquid nitrogen to check whether the tank can hold the propellant for an actual launch. The fuel tank was tested beyond its limit before it gave way and 'popped' quite dramatically. Soon, thick, white nitrogen plumes covered the test site along with whatever remained of the fuel tank.

      This was the second cryogenic pressure test to failure for the SN7 prototype. After the first test run, the spacecraft was repaired for further testing. Moreover, unlike the SN4 prototype that exploded on the test site on May 30 due to a leak, the SN7 was intentionally put through more pressure than it was built to withstand so that vital data can be gathered for the development of Starship.

      This month has been quite eventful for the Starship initiative at SpaceX. First, the founder and CEO of the company notified employees to consider the Starship project as the top priority in the foreseeable future. We then received confirmation that the company was building floating spaceports for the Starship's raison d'être—space travel and hypersonic flights. However, the first test flights for the rocket are not expected before a couple of years at least.

    • By Ather Fawaz
      SpaceX is planning to build floating spaceports for space travel and hypersonic flights
      by Ather Fawaz



      SpaceX is on quite a roll this year. After successfully completing the Dragon's first crewed flight to the International Space Station, the firm deployed 58 more Starlink satellites just a few days back. Now, the company has shifted gears back to its Starship initiative, which is slated to be SpaceX's top priority henceforth.

      After a scoop from SpaceXFleet stated that SpaceX is recruiting Offshore Operations Engineers in Brownsville, Elon Musk confirmed that the company is building a floating spaceport for space travel and hypersonic flights around the Earth. He further added that these spaceports will be refurbished oil platforms complete with a hyperloop for transportation to and from the land.

      The spaceport is intended for the Starship rocket, which is set to be SpaceX's go-to rocket for the exploration and habitation of Mars in the coming years. The recruitment location, Brownsville, is also near the Boca Chica test site where the company is currently testing the rocket's prototypes.

      While a floating spaceport has been linked to the Starship project for quite some time now, this is the first time that we've had signs of something tangible supporting the rumors. However, Musk noted that the first Earth-to-Earth flights still need substantial groundwork. He gave a window of at least two to three years before test flights for the same commence.

    • By Ather Fawaz
      Elon Musk urges SpaceX to consider Starship as the top priority
      by Ather Fawaz



      After successfully completing Crew Dragon's maiden manned flight to the International Space Station, SpaceX now wants to shift gears and prioritize other projects. As picked up by CNBC, the founder and CEO of SpaceX, Elon Musk, wrote a company-wide email urging employees to primarily focus on the Starship initiative henceforth.

      Musk asked his employees to consider devoting "significant time” to accelerate progress "dramatically and immediately" on the project. “Please consider the top SpaceX priority (apart from anything that could reduce Dragon return risk) to be Starship,” he stated in the email.

      Since day one, the Starship project has been SpaceX's bold initiative to make space travel and the inhabitation of other planets a tangible reality. While we are beyond Musk's initial planned window to put the iconic stainless steel rocket in orbit, that is not to say that the company has not been working on the project at all.

      Back in April, SpaceX released a user guide for the Starship rocket encapsulating its various configurations, and claimed that the project is "expected to allow for space-based activities that have not been possible since the retirement of the Space Shuttle and Space Transportation System or have never been possible before."

      Furthermore, SpaceX is regularly carrying out test runs of Starship's various prototypes. On May 30, despite the SN4 prototype's explosion on the test stand, preparations for testing the SN5 prototype at Boca Chica, Texas, are already underway.

    • By Ather Fawaz
      SpaceX's Starship SN4 prototype explodes on the test stand
      by Ather Fawaz

      Starship MK1 Prototype. Image via The Verge With all eyes set on Crew Dragon's maiden manned flight to the International Space Station (ISS), elsewhere, SpaceX is continuing work on Starship in tandem.

      But things quickly went south after the static fire test for the Raptor engine of the Starship SN4 prototype on Friday in Boca Chica, Texas. This was the fifth static fire test of this engine on this prototype vehicle. However, this time, after successfully completing its static fire test, the SN4 prototype exploded on the test stand. The video embedded below shows a short clip of the explosion along with its aftermath.

      The explosion occurred around 1:49 PM local time, under the two-minute mark after the static fire test. Eric Berger, the Senior Space Editor at Ars Technica tweeted that the cause of the explosion was 'some type of uncontrolled leak'. There appears to be significant damage to the test site as well.

      Image via SPadre (Twitter) While this is a setback to SpaceX and the Starship initiative, the company is already working on assembling its SN5 prototype on a launch stand nearby in Boca Chica. Testing should resume shortly once all prerequisites are set in place. Considering Elon Musk's bold plans for the program, the Starship program has picked up pace in recent months. The firm also published a short guide for the rocket back in April detailing its various configurations.

      As stated before, in Florida, the Crew Dragon is preparing for its historic flight to the ISS with astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on board. If the weather is benign, the spacecraft is slated to launch atop the Falcon 9 rocket at 03:22 PM EDT on Saturday. This is the second launch window that SpaceX has at its disposal after the Wednesday launch had to be scrubbed due to unfavorable conditions. Should Saturday's launch also run into similar issues, a third launch window is available on Sunday. You may check out our coverage of the Crew Dragon here.