Help me understand this logic


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15 minutes ago, jnelsoninjax said:

So if I understand what is being said, CDMA networks are going to have the issue like I am having, but GSM will not?

I am curious why you choose a CDMA NVMO over a GSM NVMO? I use H20 which is a GSM NVMO and I don't have any issue with the internet and talking at the same time.

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7 minutes ago, macoman said:

I am curious why you choose a CDMA NVMO over a GSM NVMO? I use H20 which is a GSM NVMO and I don't have any issue with the internet and talking at the same time.

I had no idea what type of carrier it was, only that is was compatible with my phone :/ had I known I needed to check all these behind the scene stuff, I would have!

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  • 6 months later...
On 10/03/2020 at 14:01, jnelsoninjax said:

I am considering going to Xfinity Mobile for the same price each month, and they use Verizon, so IDK if that would be any better.

I do not have that option, so it might be like @Brandon H said, something they don't offer to the NVMO's

I also checked, and I am paid up until the end of June, but honestly I have no qualms leaving early.

That limitation is on MOST carriers - the unsurprising exception (and entirely due to John Legere) is T-Mobile.  What Legere did as T-Mobile CEO was toss a lot of the PITAs that were common with carriers.  Normally, I would have had no issue with Verizon Wireless, except for one rather nasty quibble; they hated/loathed/despised AOSP - and that was all the way back to Marshmallow (Android 6).  I get why - low-end technical support geeks; the problem is that AOSP was where Android advancement showed up FIRST.  Safelink Wireless is a Universal Lifeline MVNO that is owned/operated by Tracfone (and was just acquired by Verizon Communications); however, Tracfone has MVNO contracts with other carriers - including T-Mobile - including me.  (In fact, I'm in my third year withe the UnCarrier's tower network.)  I moved to T-Mobile because - unlike Verizon Wireless - T-Mobile could care less what firmware my phone ran.  I'm on my second AOSP-capable smartphone (the first was - rather oddly - an ex-Verizon Galaxy Nexus that I had no issues moving to the UnCarrier).  I'm curious what will happen with Tracfone's non-Verizon MVNO contracts - especially on the Universal Lifeline side - as I know quite a few folks there like the freedom that Tracfone's tower network gives them vs. Verizon's tower network.  (That was why I moved, after all.)

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On 10/03/2020 at 16:00, jnelsoninjax said:

I had no idea what type of carrier it was, only that is was compatible with my phone :/ had I known I needed to check all these behind the scene stuff, I would have!

Because that limitation doesn't matter - and it didn't with the Galaxy Nexus when it came down to LTE - which supported both GSM and CDMA.  LTE - as a technology - was *independent* of the previous GSM/CDMA split - and begat something called the universal chipset - first published by Qualcomm.  GSM's advantage was price (over CDMA); CDMA's advantage was signal reliability (over GSM).  GSM (because of the price advantage) won big in Europe, Latin America, and the Indian subcontinent; CDMA, on the other hand, was the choice of Verizon and Sprint (both in North America).

The reason for the hate of LTE was not the end of the GSM/CDMA feud - but that the only publisher of universal firmware was Qualcomm - the very idea of a "Qualcomm monopoly" stuck in a lot of craws.

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4 hours ago, PGHammer said:

Because that limitation doesn't matter - and it didn't with the Galaxy Nexus when it came down to LTE - which supported both GSM and CDMA.  LTE - as a technology - was *independent* of the previous GSM/CDMA split - and begat something called the universal chipset - first published by Qualcomm.  GSM's advantage was price (over CDMA); CDMA's advantage was signal reliability (over GSM).  GSM (because of the price advantage) won big in Europe, Latin America, and the Indian subcontinent; CDMA, on the other hand, was the choice of Verizon and Sprint (both in North America).

The reason for the hate of LTE was not the end of the GSM/CDMA feud - but that the only publisher of universal firmware was Qualcomm - the very idea of a "Qualcomm monopoly" stuck in a lot of craws.

Interesting, I had not heard about this feud as you refer to it as. I am very happy with my Xfinity Mobile service, everything works like it is supposed to, the only issue I had was when sending MMS I had to force the phone to go to LTE in order to send it, but they have since fixed that issue, and for what I am paying ($15 /month) for two lines (my niece and myself) and we share 1 GB of data, and have yet to go over.

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18 hours ago, Director Fury said:

Does Cricket WIreless allow data download while on a phone call? I am looking at buying an LG Stylo 6.

As long as they support AOSP 9 or AOSP 10 (both of which - depending on the firmware - support VoLTE), they do - that is something I have been doing with various AOSP 10 firmware via VoLTE.

Xfinity Mobile uses Verizon Wireless as a background; however, there are some advantages to Xfinity Mobile compared to using Verizon Wireless directly other than price - mainly because you get unlimited access to the Xfinity hotspot network at no extra charge - and that is a LOT of hotspots.

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On 21/09/2020 at 13:10, PGHammer said:

As long as they support AOSP 9 or AOSP 10 (both of which - depending on the firmware - support VoLTE), they do - that is something I have been doing with various AOSP 10 firmware via VoLTE.

Xfinity Mobile uses Verizon Wireless as a background; however, there are some advantages to Xfinity Mobile compared to using Verizon Wireless directly other than price - mainly because you get unlimited access to the Xfinity hotspot network at no extra charge - and that is a LOT of hotspots.

Okay. How would I be able to tell if I have this, since I ordered the phone. When it comes to PC's I know a few things, but when it comes to phones I'm as newbie as newbie can be. :(
PS: I'm no coder or programmer.

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Take a peek at what or how you are connected.  if the connection says LTE, you're using a tower; if it says anything else, you're using a hotspot (and therefore, aren't getting billed for data use).  Due to VoWifi and VoLTE (two AOSP features) you can use hotspots for voice AND LTE data - as opposed to being stuck using LTE for either.

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  • 1 year later...
On 20/09/2020 at 18:43, jnelsoninjax said:

Interesting, I had not heard about this feud as you refer to it as. I am very happy with my Xfinity Mobile service, everything works like it is supposed to, the only issue I had was when sending MMS I had to force the phone to go to LTE in order to send it, but they have since fixed that issue, and for what I am paying ($15 /month) for two lines (my niece and myself) and we share 1 GB of data, and have yet to go over.

I heard about it on BroadbandReports.coom (the rebranded dslreports.com) way back in 2000.  I was, in fact, a Comcast employee (Silver Spring Online Technical Support Call Center) - I was simply keeping current on the technical side - it was not a need work-wise.  Because the Hotspot Network started growing while I was there. VoLTE deployment was of decided interest to hotspot providers (such as Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, etc.)  Naturally, the major cell phone carriers (Verizon and AT&T) were no fans of VoLTE;  T-Mobile (and John Legere in particular) could have cared less.  (This was, in fact, the start of T-Mobile's "Uncarrier" strategy.) I had nothing against Verizon in general; however, it simply made "dollars and cents" sense to switch tower providers - in fact, it still does - and especially since it also supports both 4G and 5G (you lose neither with VoLTE, as long as the phone supports them otherwise - such as the Galaxy S or Pixel 6)

 

Basically, it's still the economy.

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  • 2 months later...
On 18/11/2021 at 23:46, PGHammer said:

I heard about it on BroadbandReports.coom (the rebranded dslreports.com) way back in 2000.  I was, in fact, a Comcast employee (Silver Spring Online Technical Support Call Center) - I was simply keeping current on the technical side - it was not a need work-wise.  Because the Hotspot Network started growing while I was there. VoLTE deployment was of decided interest to hotspot providers (such as Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, etc.)  Naturally, the major cell phone carriers (Verizon and AT&T) were no fans of VoLTE;  T-Mobile (and John Legere in particular) could have cared less.  (This was, in fact, the start of T-Mobile's "Uncarrier" strategy.) I had nothing against Verizon in general; however, it simply made "dollars and cents" sense to switch tower providers - in fact, it still does - and especially since it also supports both 4G and 5G (you lose neither with VoLTE, as long as the phone supports them otherwise - such as the Galaxy S or Pixel 6)

 

Basically, it's still the economy.

Update - the Ultra Wideband 5G rollout also plays into this - as Google has a sextet of phones that support UW 5G - the Pixel 4a and 4a XL, the Pixel 5 with 5G, the Pixel 5a  and 5a XL with 5G, and the Pixel 6 and 6 Pro with 5G.  While AT&T Mobility doesn't support UW, Verizon and T-Mobile both do (and T-Mobile upped the ante by including UW 5G in Magenta Max for 55+ at no additional charge - another Legere-style sting).  Where the 6 and 6 Pro have no AOSP 12 ROMs yet, the older 5G phones do - complete with January 2022 updates - and both Verizon and T-Mobile are often 5G UW at a cost of little or none right now (crossgrade).  Mom uses Verizon's towers, while I use those of T-Mobile - and free beats fee every day of the week.

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  • 3 months later...

FOLLOWUP - Since my last post, Tracfone has been acquired by Verizon Communications - amazingly, they are are still the offering (and honoring) therr MVNO coverage agreements (including for carriers other than Verizon).  They are also widening their selection of both Android and Aaple (yes - I did say Apple) phones.  The shocker this time is a new Samsung Android phone that has a trick that I actually complained that Verizon doesn't normally support stock - Wi-Fi calling.  It also has the three-lens camera setup (ala Samsung A03 series) - which is pretty decent for a basic shooter - the screen size is bigger than ther Pixel 3a ir 4a and similat to the 4a xl  - I may have to consider this as a backup to my 3a because of the screen size and brightness alone).  Other then the wireless-calling trick (which is in not new to anyone that has used the latest Samsung firmware) it's standard Samsung One UI otherwise  - not bad, either.  I'll be finishing the setup this weekend (it's for MOM- not me) - as she wants to move away from Verizon due to bill ouch - and likely to T-Mobile).

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)
On 10/03/2020 at 11:33, shockz said:

CDMA doesn't allow call and internet traffic at the same time. Supposedly this was fixed with LTE, but I run into the same problem with Verizon with my work phone. No issues using ATT GSM/5GE on personal phone.

I have Verizon and no issues being on the phone and internet at the same time. 

 

And just noticed how old this thread was..... 

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