No TPM? No Windows 11 for you!


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12 hours ago, RottGutt said:

Sorry, this comment is a little late in the game....

 

If I'm not mistaken, you have to enable Secure Boot BEFORE installing Windows.

This is correct. I did a lot of reading and learned this. However, I was able to convert drive from BMR to GPT from recovery console Command Prompt. I went back to BIOS and enabled TPM. When I did the WIN11 test, it passed.

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13 hours ago, RottGutt said:

Sorry, this comment is a little late in the game....

 

If I'm not mistaken, you have to enable Secure Boot BEFORE installing Windows.

You only have to enable it before installing Windows for Windows to be able to use it.

Setting Secure Boot in itself isn't an issue, even if the installed Windows isn't using it.

 

The real issue is when your drive is setup as MBR and not GPT.

 

I have Secure Boot enabled in my BIOS settings, but do not in my OS and it boots fine, but my drives are also setup as GPT.

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Hello,

If you are doing a UEFI/GPT install, you should be able to activate Secure Boot post-installation.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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3 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

If you are doing a UEFI/GPT install, you should be able to activate Secure Boot post-installation.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

You can but it will not be used by Windows. 
 

If you go to msinfo32, you can see the Secure Boot status does not change. 

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On 26/06/2021 at 22:34, Steven P. said:

I really wonder what the reason is for requiring relatively new CPUs, what does 8th gen Intel have that 7th gen doesn't?

I think it's because of the sandbox type stuff they're doing for security, they must be making heavy use of a virtual environment to run things in.

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I can at least understand if the TPM requirement was meant for the "Pro" variant but not for all Windows 11 versions. Just seems weird that this requirement makes a lot of PCs obsolete by 2025 by Microsoft's standards.

Edited by XIAKC
forgot to add some stuff
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1 hour ago, XIAKC said:

I can at least understand if the TPM requirement was meant for the "Pro" variant but not for all Windows 11 versions. Just seems weird that this requirement makes a lot of PCs obsolete by 2025 by Microsoft's standards.

 

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Hello,

 

I have installed Windows 10 before with Secure Boot disabled, then enabled it, and had the operating system come up as secured under System Informatoin (filename: MSINFO32.EXE).  However, it is entire possible it does not work universally, or that I may have set some option in the UEFI firmware which allowed this scenario to work.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

  

17 hours ago, adrynalyne said:

You can but it will not be used by Windows. 
 

If you go to msinfo32, you can see the Secure Boot status does not change. 

 

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1 hour ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

 

I have installed Windows 10 before with Secure Boot disabled, then enabled it, and had the operating system come up as secured under System Informatoin (filename: MSINFO32.EXE).  However, it is entire possible it does not work universally, or that I may have set some option in the UEFI firmware which allowed this scenario to work.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

  

 

Huh. Maybe I ran into a Windows 11 bug then. 

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I think there's a misunderstanding regarding the Win11 issue of TPM and other standards, and how they will effect older computers. At least the current beta version of Win11 runs fine on any older computers currently running Win10; I ran it on my H97 4770S build and everything was fine and fully functional. The real current issue is the Installer routine, and how it rejects certain computers. This current issue is twofold: 1: how to bypass the Installer restrictions, which is certainly possible since MS announced it will provide versions for OEM installers that don't require TPM and other standards. There have also been numerous articles proposing installation workarounds for the more technically adventuresome. And 2: will Win11 later be modified to perform ongoing post-installation hardware checks to identify and block continuing usage of Win11 on non-compliant hardware. If the second issue does not happen and the Installer remains the sole obstacle, and the Installer can be readily bypassed by obtaining an OEM ISO or software patches, then most of the older computers will be able to continue in usage using Win11 even if they require a fresh installation. So its really too early to claim that TPM and other standards will make any older computer obsolete.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I turned on TPM awhile back to test for Windows 11 like a lot of people and it passed.

 

What happens if I upgrade my CPU now?  Will it freak out?  I have a 5900x that finally came in.

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On 31/07/2021 at 23:47, Jaybonaut said:

So I turned on TPM awhile back to test for Windows 11 like a lot of people and it passed.

 

What happens if I upgrade my CPU now?  Will it freak out?  I have a 5900x that finally came in.

Well if you turned it on, that’s the CPU. So if you swap to another CPU, make sure you aren’t using bitlocker or have turned it off prior to swapping. You might have to sign back in to anything using Windows Hello too. 

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On 01/08/2021 at 02:02, adrynalyne said:

Well if you turned it on, that’s the CPU. So if you swap to another CPU, make sure you aren’t using bitlocker or have turned it off prior to swapping. You might have to sign back in to anything using Windows Hello too. 

I don't use bitlocker.  What happens if I swap and don't turn it off in Win 10?

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On 01/08/2021 at 00:03, Jaybonaut said:

I don't use bitlocker.  What happens if I swap and don't turn it off in Win 10?

Don’t turn what off? fTPM? Just what I mentioned above. 

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On 01/08/2021 at 02:11, adrynalyne said:

Don’t turn what off? fTPM? Just what I mentioned above. 

So nothing happens, other than a chance of having to log in?

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On 01/08/2021 at 00:14, Jaybonaut said:

So nothing happens, other than a chance of having to log in?

Yup, unless bitlocker encrypted, which you already said you don’t use. 

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