Mandrake 10 Install


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unknown753

I'm downloading the ISOs as of now. 3 ISO Images which are 695MB each. I'm still reading up on creating a partition on my HD for Linux (considering 5GB).

Any opinions of which (if any) software to use to create the partition for Mandrake 10? Keep in mind its for a dual boot machine running WinXP as the primary OS.

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markjensen

You don't have to "make" anything to prepare to install Mandrake. Just make the blank room (5GB is fine) on your Hard Drive. Use around 300-500MB for your swap partition, and let the installer pick everything else.

It will set up dual boot fine (install your GRUB or LILO boot info into the MBR on your boot drive). When you boot, it will offer you a choice of OSes (with Mandrake as default, of course);)

If anything seems scary or you have questions or problems, there are a LOT of people here willing to help. :yes:

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unknown753

I resized my XP Partition to make 7GB of empty space for Mandrake. Installed Mandrake (only with CD1 because I didn't want to add the packages in CD2 & CD3 until I really got the hang of linux.) I created a username and password then booted into Mandrake, entered my username and pass then typed 'startx' to get into the Desktop. I got an error that WOULDN'T let me go any further. I figured it was a curropt installation so I decided to delete the partition and start fresh. Booted back into WinXP, opened up Partition Magic and get the following error. "Init failed: Error 117. Partition's drive letter cannot be identified" then Partition Magic terminates. HOW do I get rid of god forsaken Mandrake? Why does the linux gods hate me and Why do I just basically suck at this? Forget the last 2 questions. Any help appreciated as always fellas.

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slimshady89

whoa there u were really impatient there, as far as I know u must install some things from CD 2 and CD 3

about Paritition Magic that is because Linux created a partition itself hda# where # is well a number

and partition magic needs letters, and that hda# causes PM8 to crash ... that happened to me, I didnt want to remove MDK 10 juss wanted to increase its size but I dont really care anymore

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unknown753
whoa there u were really impatient there, as far as I know u must install some things from CD 2 and CD 3

about Paritition Magic that is because Linux created a partition itself hda# where # is well a number

and partition magic needs letters, and that hda# causes PM8 to crash ... that happened to me, I didnt want to remove MDK 10 juss wanted to increase its size but I dont really care anymore

How did you solve the issue? I wasn't in a rush at all. I have all 3 CDs downloaded just didn't want to burn them all to CDs.

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markjensen

entered my username and pass then typed 'startx' to get into the Desktop. I got an error that WOULDN'T let me go any further.

What error? It would help to know this. ;)

Booted back into WinXP, opened up Partition Magic and get the following error. "Init failed: Error 117. Partition's drive letter cannot be identified" then Partition Magic terminates.

Windows cannot assign a drive letter to a partition with a filesystem it cannot read. Shouldn't be a big deal, but it shows that Partition Magic isn't a very good program (at least version 8 isn't). I thought Partition Magic was better than this.... Anyhow, unless you want to install 3rd party software in Windows to allow Windows to see your Linux partition, you just have to accept the fact that Windows has blinders on and only sees Microsoft stuff.

HOW do I get rid of god forsaken Mandrake?If you need to remove the partition, fdisk will do the trick. But, if you are just trying to get Mandrake to work, then I would suggest identifying the problem from question #1, and fixing that. It may be as simple as telling Linux what monitor, video card and resolution you want... Rarely, in the Linux World, will you need to reformat/reload.

Why does the linux gods hate me and Why do I just basically suck at this? :unsure: Well, normally I recommend a full, or typical, install for first time Linuxers. That way they can look at what is available (even though there are lots of choices) and pick what suits them best.

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JimmyT
Rarely, in the Linux World, will you need to reformat/reload.

:o

I can't keep a Linux installation for more than an hour!

I install a Linux release using Default mouse settings, but since I have a 5 button optical mouse, I choose one that looks better in the configuration... Next time I logon, my mouse is not working!, I change the configuration back to default, and it still doesn't work...

1st format...

Ok, after the format I leave the default mouse setting. I use 2 keyboard interfaces, and when I want to change between them, in windows I use Control + Shift (or ALT + Shift as default). I'm looking for something that looks like interface or language changer on Linux and since I can't find anything, I go to the control panel and re-add the language and on the next reboot... X cannot find the specified fonts and X can't be loaded :blink: As a begginer I am, I can't do anything about that so...

2nd format...

messing with soundcards, NICs, graphics cards and I need to format again...

But I want to try again :D

I have just some questions...

1. Does MS Wireless Intellimouse Explorer work at all on Mandrake 10 or is it like any other version and distribution where the mouse works fine on installation and on X can move only on one of the two axis, and buttons act crazy?

2. What's the command that gets me to x setup when I'm on the command line and cannot access X?

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markjensen

To look at the reason why your 5-button mouse is having problems we will need to know what mouse it is, and also see a copy of your XF86Config file.

I'm not sure about your switching keyboards thing... I only use one keyboard on my PC... :(

1. Does MS Wireless Intellimouse Explorer work at all on Mandrake 10 or is it like any other version and distribution where the mouse works fine on installation and on X can move only on one of the two axis, and buttons act crazy?

At the very worst, your mouse should move about normally, but you might not get all of the extra button functions...

2. What's the command that gets me to x setup when I'm on the command line and cannot access X?

You need to run xf86config.

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JimmyT

Thanks, I'll try that (the xf86config) on my virtual machine, or on the next real installation, when 10 final is out on ISO.

Do you by any chance know if it's possible to get mandrake 10's X working on a Virtual Machine? The new version of X server (4.xx) doesn't work. Only 3.x.x worked on virtual machines, and they excluded it from mandrake 10.

I'm downloading mandrakeMove now, I'll let you know if the mouse works there.

BTW, where is the XF86Config file? How do I copy it in ... let's say a floppy disk?

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markjensen

You are doing this virtually? Then you need to use your VM host info for your video, etc.

Look in /etc/X11/ for your XF86Config.

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unknown753

To keep you guys updated. I created 5GB of space for Mandrake 10 and installed it. I get the Linux boot menu at bootup giving me the options of booting into Linux, Linux (something else), Windows or Floppy. I'd like to know how to get rid of this menu and just use the default MS boot screen with only the Mandrake10 and WinXP options there (WinXP as default). I've done this a long time ago but can't remember how.

Secondly, seems now that after Mandrake 10 is installed, Windows XP will not shut down. Im using a laptop and when shutting down windows, it gets stuck at "Shutting Down" or "Saving Your Settings". How can I resolve this issue so that WinXP will automatically turn off my computer?

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unknown753

Crap just keeps on coming at me. So I was using KDE and everything was all sweet and peachy. My dumb self said to self "Hey.. wouldn't it be fun to create a user instead of using root?". That's how it all started. Now I don't get the option to even login as root. I get 3 errors.

The first error. "There was an error setting up inter-process communications for KDE. The message returned by the system was: Could not read network connection list. /home/unknown753/.DCOPserver_localhost_0. Please check that the "dcopserver" program is running."

The second error. "Will not save configuration. Configuration file "/home/unknow753/.kde/share/config/ksplashre" not writeable. Configuration file "/home/unknow753/.kde/share/config/kdeglobals" not writeable. Please contact system administrator."

The third error. "The following installation program was detected while trying to start KDE. /home/unknown753/........ oh for crying out loud I can't remember the last 3 words.

Give it to me straight people, am I simply too simple minded for linux? This OS has had me aggravated to the point where I was literally yelling at people for talking too loudly outside. How can I fix this?

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markjensen
To keep you guys updated. I created 5GB of space for Mandrake 10 and installed it. I get the Linux boot menu at bootup giving me the options of booting into Linux, Linux (something else), Windows or Floppy. I'd like to know how to get rid of this menu and just use the default MS boot screen with only the Mandrake10 and WinXP options there (WinXP as default). I've done this a long time ago but can't remember how.

I see you have two posts, so I will just respond to them individually...

For this one, my first question would be "why?", as you have GRUB working properly to boot your OSes. GRUB is much more capable than the Microsoft Boot Loader. You can edit your boot commands at boottime in GRUB. You can also switch to a Command Mode, and poke around in a shell-like environment, should something go wrong.

With the Microsoft Boot Loader... You can pick from your options, and hope it boots.

With that said, you can do it this way (short version - google for the full procedure if you are still interested):

  • Boot into Linux.
  • Use the dd command to copy your Linux boot info to somewhere Windows will be able to see it (like C:\linboot.dat).
  • Use fdisk /mbr or fixmbr in Windows to reset the MBR to the Windows Way.
  • Manually edit your C:\boot.ini to add your Linux boot information.

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markjensen
Crap just keeps on coming at me. So I was using KDE and everything was all sweet and peachy. My dumb self said to self "Hey.. wouldn't it be fun to create a user instead of using root?". That's how it all started. Now I don't get the option to even login as root. I get 3 errors.

The first error.... snip

The second error.... snip

The third error.... snip

Give it to me straight people, am I simply too simple minded for linux? This OS has had me aggravated to the point where I was literally yelling at people for talking too loudly outside. How can I fix this?

This one has me!

How did you create your new user? I assume the Mandrake control panel item for this? Perhaps there is a bug with it...

I have never had to repair user problems (though I have added and removed users a few times in the past with the command line).

The disturbing part is that your root login isn't working....

Two options come to mind.... Boot into runlevel 3 (text mode) by editing your normal boot command to have init 3 at the end., and see if your root and your new user can log in that way. I am going to guess that they can, and the problem is with KDE and not the basic Linux user system.

If you *cannot* boot into root at all, you can use GRUB to boot into "singleuser" mode by editing your normal boot command to have singleuser at the end. You are sort of like a level above root here, except that the system is 'crippled' in a few ways. Think of it like "safe mode" in Linux. You can change the root password here without knowing its password (a way to get root access on a local machine without a GRUB password this way)

As for as Linux being too tough... I can say that for whatever reason, some systems (hardware + distro choice + user + rotten luck) have more difficulties than others. The only time that it becomes "too tough" is based on when the individual decides to stop learning and give up. It is not necessarily based on the user alone.

Until you get to the point where you give up, other Linux users will be here to help you. :yes:

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unknown753

I decided to just reinstall Mandrake once again and i'm actually responding from the web browser "Konqueror" within the OS. Everything seems to be going smoothly and i've also decided to just keep GRUB and poke around with various themes. I'm using KDE and love it!

I do have a couple questions. During setup I entered my password for root as "root". From my user account (unknown753) when I try to get into the Computer Configuration console I get prompted for the root password. I enter "root" and it gives me "Invalid Password". What could be wrong?

I do however have another question. I have a PCMCIA USB 2.0 card for my laptop (since my laptop has USB 1.1 ports) and I use an external USB CD Burner on the PCMCIA card. I hooked everything up but I dont know how to access the USB CD Burner Drive. Though my built in CD Drive does work.

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markjensen
I decided to just reinstall Mandrake once again and i'm actually responding from the web browser "Konqueror" within the OS. Everything seems to be going smoothly and i've also decided to just keep GRUB and poke around with various themes. I'm using KDE and love it!
Congratulations! :D
I do have a couple questions. During setup I entered my password for root as "root". From my user account (unknown753) when I try to get into the Computer Configuration console I get prompted for the root password. I enter "root" and it gives me "Invalid Password". What could be wrong?
:pinch: Bad idea to use "root" as your root password. Equally bad to post it online! :laugh: I guess it is a good thing it doesn't wotk then... :p lol

Are you sure you have the case correct? You can do a "password reset" thing on your root account by entering "singleuser" mode and executing the passwd command. (which, for a more secure local system, you should password-protect GRUB, too)

I do however have another question. I have a PCMCIA USB 2.0 card for my laptop (since my laptop has USB 1.1 ports) and I use an external USB CD Burner on the PCMCIA card. I hooked everything up but I dont know how to access the USB CD Burner Drive. Though my built in CD Drive does work.
A USB drive will appear as sdx# with x being a letter a-z, and the number being the partition found.

You can do a dmesg | grep sd to see your bootup messages that relate to your serial drives. That will help show you what your drive may be called.

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unknown753

I'm searching google on articles on how to reset my root account password. I'm currently on my user account and even when I logout I don't see any option to login as root. When I logout, I can only click on my name and enter a password, not able to type in a username. From the terminal I tried typing in "su" and then my root password but same thing, no go. I'm pretty sure case isn't an issue because I checked it first before typing in the password during setup.

How can I enter "singleuser" mode, and can it be done from my user account ?

As far as the USB Drive goes, you lost me on "sdx" and the "dmesg | grep sd". No clue on that stuff, but really isn't an issue at this point.

Thanks again for all your help.

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markjensen

The sdx# meant that your drive may show up as

sda1

sdb4

sda3 or anything like that.

The dmesg | grep sd will show you everything detected and configured on boot. You can see what it was assigned to.

As for singleuser, it is a special mode that can be entered by pressing "e" when in the GRUB part of the boot process. Then you can add "singleuser" or "init 1" at the end of your normally executed boot instruction and you will be in singleuser mode

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unknown753

Maybe i'm missing something. I pressed 'e' in GRUB (that menu where I select which OS i'd like to boot into). Nothing happens so I kept pressing 'e' throughout the bootup process, still nothing. Is there any alternative way to enter singleuser mode?

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markjensen

Maybe it is just that I am not remembering it right... :unsure:

On your GRUB bootup screen, it should say something like 'c' for command mode, 'e' for edit or something else to enter any sort of optional boot...

If you can't find anything, I will reboot and see what it says on my Fedora install.

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unknown753

The GRUB screen is the one with the OS selection option, am I right? Where i'm able to select Linux, Windows, or boot from Floppy, etc.? If that's the one then no, no mention of that there. I don't see any options such as the one you're telling me throughout the bootup process either.

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Ruciz

unknown753: No, GRUB Is a GUI interface, its one of your linux desktop shells like KDE, enlightenment. (forget the proper term) LILO I think is the boot loader that selects the partition to boot (windows, linux, failsafe, floppy - at least with mandrake)

use a computer with very little features. (basically a decent monitor, keyboard, mouse, CD-ROM/Writer, floppy drive and ethernet card) to get used to using linux. If you can master getting all those to work, then attempt others.

I installed it on my A20m IBM laptop, worked like a dream. I tried on my dual-monitor XP 2500+ with DVD-/+RW drive, CD-R/W drive, TV capture card, scanner, digital camera, webcam, printer, gamepads, USB sticks.. you know, all the good stuff) and I couldn't even get past setting up the dual-monitors much less the optical trackball's extra 2 buttons.

Just keep it simple to begin and install it on a simple system. Anything over a PII 400 with 96 MB ram and 24x CD-ROM should work wonders for you. After you get used to instaling programs, setting up devices then try for your desktop.

*/edit - a lil slow, GRUB is multiboot boot loader... Gnome is a shell.. :( oops

Edited by Ruciz
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unknown753

If GRUB is the desktop shell, when would I enter 'e' so I would be able to type in "singleuser"? Special key sequence? I'm just confused here.

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Ruciz

I don't understand what you mean there.. you lost me. When I installed mandrake it started Xfree automatically I think, which is the graphical interface for linux so you can run shells and not be stuck in the terminal. It sets up which shell you want to run, KDE, Gnome, Enlightenment etc. The singleuser special key sequence I never heard of, but now I am reacalling that you can use GRUB as an interactive bootloader with mouse support. Hmm...

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unknown753

In other words, how can I enter singleuser mode? I'd like to reset my root password and was told I would be able to change it by typing in "passwd" in "singleuser" mode.

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