Windows 7 experience


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Windows 7 experience  

1,826 members have voted

  1. 1. How was installation?

    • 7 - Awsome, very fast, no problems!
      1163
    • 6
      394
    • 5
      171
    • 4
      54
    • 3
      20
    • 2
      7
    • 1 - Couldn't be worse. Got nasty errors, couldn't install.
      17
  2. 2. How is compatability

    • 7 - Everything compatible (programs and hardware)
      750
    • 6
      611
    • 5
      319
    • 4
      99
    • 3
      27
    • 2
      7
    • 1 - Nothing at all, not even crucial things(processor, etc)
      13
  3. 3. The features

    • 7 - It has everything
      713
    • 6
      626
    • 5
      354
    • 4
      85
    • 3
      20
    • 2
      11
    • 1 - It has nothing, windows 1 was better.
      17


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Never had an OS that runs so smoothly and very fast, no program compatability problems.

had vista before windows 7 Ultimate X64, and wow, when i switched thought i had gone to heaven LOL

ran Windows XP pro before Vista and to be honest XP was better in performance.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Windows 7 is great..... It just doesn't like when I have other USB devices connected when I load the HDD drivers via a USB thumb drive. It locks up 2/3 the way of install.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I didn't have an issue throwing this on my macbook pro, but I'm no longer running it as I switched to Ubuntu then had some iPhone issues so reinstalled OS X

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  • 3 weeks later...

15 people are really sad... (1 for features if you haven't guessed)

Great OS. Moved from XP two years ago and haven't looked back. Memory management is much better and performance is great with 4GB of RAM.

Are you running x64?

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  • 2 weeks later...
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  • 3 weeks later...

Or copy "show desktop.scf" from any previous version of Windows and pin it to the taskbar :p

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Or click the "Show Desktop" button at the far right side of the taskbar. (Y)

Seriously, why would you not to that? The previous implementation was ugly and messy, now I actually find myself using it.

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  • 1 month later...

Seriously, why would you not to that? The previous implementation was ugly and messy, now I actually find myself using it.

Its extremely useful and having it in the corner requires little accuracy.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

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  • 1 month later...

I have two extreme comparisons of Windows 7:

Home:

It's a great operating system, powerful and easy to use. By far the most useful tool is the Start Bar search, originally from Vista, but it is amazing.

Work: (Secondary School, UK)

It just doesn't work correctly on a mixed environment of Server 2003 and Server 2008, as well as a mixed environment of Windows XP and Windows 7. Mandatory profiles were a bugger to do, as Microsoft want you to do the Sysprep way, but we build up system images for Ghosting. We've had to use to many registry hacks and the likes. We are still having problems with ghost profiles and other niggles. After months of configuration, it is in what seems to be a working state, but only after a lot of hacking.

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I have two extreme comparisons of Windows 7:

Home:

It's a great operating system, powerful and easy to use. By far the most useful tool is the Start Bar search, originally from Vista, but it is amazing.

Work: (Secondary School, UK)

It just doesn't work correctly on a mixed environment of Server 2003 and Server 2008, as well as a mixed environment of Windows XP and Windows 7. Mandatory profiles were a bugger to do, as Microsoft want you to do the Sysprep way, but we build up system images for Ghosting. We've had to use to many registry hacks and the likes. We are still having problems with ghost profiles and other niggles. After months of configuration, it is in what seems to be a working state, but only after a lot of hacking.

What version of Windows 7 are you running in that scenario? If it's Home Premium then you need to ditch it and get Pro or Ultimate as they are better suited to work environments.

I would add the roles that Server 2003 provides to Server 2008 and ditch Server 2003 as well as ditching Windows XP for one of the two versions of Windows 7 I mentioned above and use XP mode for applications that need XP. Setting group policy on the server and setting up profiles using Active Directory would make much more sense along with keeping the software stored on the server and then use Sysprep to set up the systems and add a script for pulling the relevant software directly from the server then image it without the software being installed, no registry hacks needed.

Sorry if that sounds like i'm "teaching my grandmother how to suck eggs" but the above is what I would do, I have worked for a school as a network admin so I know how hard it can be to get them to spend money to get the network set up.

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What version of Windows 7 are you running in that scenario? If it's Home Premium then you need to ditch it and get Pro or Ultimate as they are better suited to work environments.

I would add the roles that Server 2003 provides to Server 2008 and ditch Server 2003 as well as ditching Windows XP for one of the two versions of Windows 7 I mentioned above and use XP mode for applications that need XP. Setting group policy on the server and setting up profiles using Active Directory would make much more sense along with keeping the software stored on the server and then use Sysprep to set up the systems and add a script for pulling the relevant software directly from the server then image it without the software being installed, no registry hacks needed.

Sorry if that sounds like i'm "teaching my grandmother how to suck eggs" but the above is what I would do, I have worked for a school as a network admin so I know how hard it can be to get them to spend money to get the network set up.

We are using Windows 7 Professional.

We have 5 DCs, four of which are Server 2003, the newest is Server 2008. The latter is what we have usd to setup the group policies, and also added the ADM to Server 2003. However, we can't just change over the other DCs. Three are core servers, which also do file shares (home folders) for staff and students. We have to wait until the summer holidays. The other DC is a certificate server, so that's going to be a pain to transfer. There's also no guarantee that Server 2008 will install on these servers, as they are a few years old now. We simply don't have the money to replace, our budget has been massively slashed this year due to government cuts.

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I just bought a netbook today with Windows 7 Starter edition. I must say that I am 100% disappointed with that version, I mean, come one, you can't even change your background?? WTF Microsoft that is the stupidest ****ing thing I've ever heard of. Hell, even free operating systems have that as a BASIC feature.

So I used my home premium key on my laptop to upgrade the old netbook, and now I am back to loving everything about Windows 7.... home premium edition that is.

I'd say my only gripe about the default setup is having windows automaticaly maximize when you move the windows the the edge of the screen. It was a pain to find that setting, because it really isn't clearly labeled.

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  • 3 months later...

7

7

I noticed my x64 Windows 7 uses large amounts of RAM. For example, now I have running IE with a few tabs, comunicator, email, and a few gadgets, wmp... and it uses from 1.5 - 1.7 GB of RAM.

I think that happens with most modern Operating Systems, Lion for example is using nearly 2GB of RAM with just Chrome (9 tabs) and iTunes open

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Loving it so far. The search, the new taskbar, jump lists, aero peek, shake and snap, quick boot and shutdown... One of the most user friendly operating systems ever. :)

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What version of Windows 7 are you running in that scenario? If it's Home Premium then you need to ditch it and get Pro or Ultimate as they are better suited to work environments.

I would add the roles that Server 2003 provides to Server 2008 and ditch Server 2003 as well as ditching Windows XP for one of the two versions of Windows 7 I mentioned above and use XP mode for applications that need XP. Setting group policy on the server and setting up profiles using Active Directory would make much more sense along with keeping the software stored on the server and then use Sysprep to set up the systems and add a script for pulling the relevant software directly from the server then image it without the software being installed, no registry hacks needed.

Sorry if that sounds like i'm "teaching my grandmother how to suck eggs" but the above is what I would do, I have worked for a school as a network admin so I know how hard it can be to get them to spend money to get the network set up.

if it was ever that easy, everyone would be doing that...

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