Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick out NOW!


 Share

Recommended Posts

I've got a simple question for all the Linux / Ubuntu users (please don't flame me!) :

If you ask a question cordially, then no Linux user will ever flame you ;)

Is Linux still behind the curve when it come to codec, video acceleration and 2D/3D stuff?

It never has been "behind the curve" as you put it. Provided your hardware is fully supported, your experience will be the same if not better than on other OS's.

My last attempt at using Ubuntu (and Kubuntu) left me with a bad taste because codec support and smooth playback seems to be less than impressive compared to Windows.

When was the last time you tried? What hardware do you have (graphics card, memory, processor, motherboard etc)?

I did install the correct video drivers, but my feeling is that the underlying X system seems to be slow.

I can say with confidence that virtually (occasionally you get a system with poor hardware support) every system I've installed Ubuntu on has had a performance improvement compared to windows. Less disk access, especially compared to vista/7, better 3D frame rates, and smoother 2D desktop rendering, all the while using less memory (usually 1/2 of windows vista/7).

Correct me if I'm wrong...

Corrected xD. But seriously, I don't see any of those problems these days. There are the odd laptops these days that suffer from bad hardware support, but that's usually down to the manufacturer, still though, I don't see very many. Linux hardware support has come a long way over the last few years. Give it a try today and tell us about your experience ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So let me get this straight, you are saying that if a distro includes useful software like OpenOffice, Gimp etc, it's a noob distro? What the hell are you smoking lol, virtually every distro includes additional software, even Sabayon Linux, which is a derivative of Gentoo. So that makes every distro for noobs?, I guess so according to your logic. You sir are an idiot, and know nothing about GNU/Linux.

I'm sure you know what he's talking about, even if the terminology isn't 100% correct. There's plenty of reasons why Ubuntu is considered as a more user-friendly distro than usual, one of the rare few among ~100s of other distros that generally offer a poor UX. And no, it's not just for superficial reasons. Hopefully you're just being a boor and feigning ignorance, because if you really didn't know that it's simply hilarious how you're calling other people idiots and accusing them of knowing nothing about GNU/Linux.

Windows % market share has been on the decline for a decade, and shows no signs of abating. Whereas Mac and Linux OS's are getting stronger and stronger with each iteration. And by the way, it's greater than 1% worldwide, and in some countries has a much higher percentage. The nice thing about Ubuntu is the dependable release cycle of six months. When is the next windows OS due? Who knows...

Oh noes, the year of desktop Linux is coming! Wait, now where have I heard that one before...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone confirm if they fixed the broadcom wireless drivers? in 10.04 wireless is a pain in the ass.

Thats broadcomm's fault. Their linux support is abysmal. I did read about broadcomm recently releasing some open source drivers though but I haven't looked into it much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Linux is improving but not ready to switch. Maybe in 2 years I might make it my default operating system. Linux is still too buggy and not enfough native Windows Aps are for Linux (Such as AIM and Steam). I look forward to Ubuntu 12.04 (March 2012). Hopefully in a year and a half, all the bugs will be worked out and will finally have Steam support as well as AIM for Linux. :whistle:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Linux is improving but not ready to switch. Maybe in 2 years I might make it my default operating system. Linux is still too buggy and not enfough native Windows Aps are for Linux (Such as AIM and Steam). I look forward to Ubuntu 12.04 (March 2012). Hopefully in a year and a half, all the bugs will be worked out and will finally have Steam support as well as AIM for Linux. :whistle:

You're not using Linux because of frickin' AIM?

You do right to stay away :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're not using Linux because of frickin' AIM?

You do right to stay away :rolleyes:

I am not using Linux because:

(1) ATI Drivers are horrible (hopefully will improve over time)

(2) Fonts are horrible (hopefully will improve in new versions)

(3) No Steam Application (Wine is not the solution as it?s slow and buggy)

(4) No AIM 7 for Linux (Pigeon is not the solution as the GUI is very unappealing)

Ubuntu has come a long way over the past few years which is why I said in 2 years, I might make it my default operating system. By that time I hope ATI drivers will have improved significantly, better looking fonts and more Windows Applications for Linux.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not using Linux because:

(1) ATI Drivers are horrible (hopefully will improve over time)

(2) Fonts are horrible (hopefully will improve in new versions)

(3) No Steam Application (Wine is not the solution as it?s slow and buggy)

(4) No AIM 7 for Linux (Pigeon is not the solution as the GUI is very unappealing)

Ubuntu has come a long way over the past few years which is why I said in 2 years, I might make it my default operating system. By that time I hope ATI drivers will have improved significantly, better looking fonts and more Windows Applications for Linux.

Fonts? Seriously? dude if someone doesn't use an OS because of fonts they seriously needs to get out more.. to me i could give a crap, they all look the same to me..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fonts? Seriously? dude if someone doesn't use an OS because of fonts they seriously needs to get out more.. to me i could give a crap, they all look the same to me..

Fonts do make a big difference in my opinion and in others too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

?Must try it out later. Waiting for Mint 10 and will use that instead on my laptop.

Fonts? Seriously? dude if someone doesn't use an OS because of fonts they seriously needs to get out more.. to me i could give a crap, they all look the same to me..

Fonts matter a lot. And is one of many issues with Linux. I think you will be surprised of how many who doesn't use Linux because of the fonts.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

even Sabayon Linux, which is a derivative of Gentoo. So that makes every distro for noobs?

What's this supposed to mean? "Even"? Sabayon isn't exactly the epitome of "advanced user distro".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Font rendering is also one of the reasons I don't use Linux (in this case, Ubuntu) as my primary OS. It looks very different to say Mac OS X (round, sharp, well defined characters) and Windows looks very decent with cleartype on. Anyway I just downloaded 10.10, i'll give it a try this evening. If you work on programming or design, FONTS DO MATTER, hell even for light web browsing, bad font rendering will cause headaches, etc and I am not exaggerating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Ubuntu for years now. Not on a regular basis, but once in a while to try out the new features and to see how it has evolved. It still has a lot of catching up to Windows 7 in terms of:

- Gaming. I am a user of Steam and often play games, games which are not natively supported in this OS. I know it's not their fault, but still... I would miss my games if only used Linux;

- Yes, fonts. I find the default fonts too big, kinda bad looking, and therefore have to install windows fonts to make them look better;

- Multimedia capabilities. Specifically video with VDPAU, I can't seem to have v-sync in videos with compiz enabled.

- Theming. Only a few are, IMO, pretty, and I find that they ocupy too much desktop space (like the big default fonts). I would have liked a more compact look on the windows, buttons and controls.

On the other hand, there are other things that are truly magnificent and way ahead of Windows:

- Notifications. They're amazing. I love the way the music player integrates with the volume button, just like the mail button has integration with social networks and internet messaging.

- Installation is flawless. Dare I say, easier to install than Windows?

- Lots of applications. Unlike the pretty-much barebones installation of any Windows, Ubuntu comes already with tons of software.

- UI customization. The tools are there with many desktop managers, but like I say above, the finished products, i.e. themes, lack quality.

- Free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- Installation is flawless. Dare I say, easier to install than Windows?

how so?

it is as easy as windows.

quite flawless install , but i have yet to try in in real environment as opposed to VM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Linux is improving but not ready to switch.

Completely disagree. It's fast, stable, and very user friendly these days.

Maybe in 2 years I might make it my default operating system.

I highly doubt you'll use anything but windows.

Linux is still too buggy

What bugs are you talking about precisely?

and not enfough native Windows Aps

It's not called windows, it's called Linux. Use Linux apps on Linux, and windows apps on windows. It's that simple.

(Such as AIM and Steam).

The pre-installed Empathy instant messaging client already supports AIM, and many other networks, such as MSN, Google Talk, IRC, Jabber, ICQ, Yahoo, Facebook chat, etc all in one client. As for steam, well that's coming to Linux in the near future AFAIK.

I look forward to Ubuntu 12.04 (March 2012). Hopefully in a year and a half, all the bugs will be worked out and will finally have Steam support as well as AIM for Linux. :whistle:

Obvious troll is obvious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah, 10.10 is awesome I don't think I'll ever boot into windows again...

1: following the guide on the site, the tool they told me to use doesn't have the netbook edition so, I needed to figure out I need to rename the netbook iso in order to make the bootable memory stick

2: after install the first thing I get is a message that it can't load unity because there's no driver, wtf.... awesome UX...

3: can't download said driver cause there's no drivier for my WiFi

4: plugin in network cable not working, can't connect to network. from my previous ubuntu and mint experience I suspect this is because I didn't remove the swap drive

5: reinstalled and removed and recreated all the linux partitions.

6: wired network still no working.

F this crap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

how so?

It's not, they're equally easy. My bad, I should have rephrased/corrected that.

I really like how now you still are performing setup actions like choosing keyboard layout, location or username and the OS is already installing. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah, 10.10 is awesome I don't think I'll ever boot into windows again...

1: following the guide on the site, the tool they told me to use doesn't have the netbook edition so, I needed to figure out I need to rename the netbook iso in order to make the bootable memory stick

2: after install the first thing I get is a message that it can't load unity because there's no driver, wtf.... awesome UX...

3: can't download said driver cause there's no drivier for my WiFi

4: plugin in network cable not working, can't connect to network. from my previous ubuntu and mint experience I suspect this is because I didn't remove the swap drive

5: reinstalled and removed and recreated all the linux partitions.

6: wired network still no working.

F this crap.

Why would not removing the swap partition prevent you from getting online?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just managed to create a bootable USB for my netbook, and right out the box it's the wifi is working, which was a major stumbling block the last time I tried it.

I've been using Jolicloud since the beginning of the year and didn't think I'd ever move away from it, now having given 10.10 a spin I can see me starting again with Ubuntu. It's certainly a lot quicker and responsive, plus the UI is very intuitive. Just need to set aside sometime at the weekend to get fully up and running.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

how so?

(1) The system doesn't have to reboot several times during installation

(2) It automatically resizes partitions for you, and recognises ntfs partitions, but the same can not be said of windows recognising ext.

(3) The installation often stalls while "expanding windows files" for win7.

(4) Difficult installing windows 7/vista from a usb stick.

(5) Lightning fast installation for Ubuntu.

(6) Fits on a cd-r

(7) Can test it out before installing using the live cd.

(8) Doesn't interrupt install to enter user name/password and other options.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.