'Back by popular demand.': HP goes back to Windows 7


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I've not seen anything about this "war" other than HP moving towards Android devices while also pointing out that Microsoft moving in to hardware makes them competitors, but since I can't find any specific mention about why they have made this decision, your guess is as good as mine. Personally I would consider it more of a business move than an act of agression. Offer Windows 7 as well as Windows 8 to cater to your customer's wants.

EDIT: I should probably reword that last bit as you're not saying that HP have done this as an act of agression, you're saying that they are going back on their plans with Android. But still, I may as well leave it.

 

What i'm saying is its not a windows 8 thing. that's the excuse people can use,but I don't believe it has anything to do with consumer OS choice. it has more to do with Microsoft making hardware,and Microsoft potentially stealing their corporate customers. So HP must do something to hurt Microsoft, maybe get them to back off. Their chromebook/android stuff is probably not selling as well as they would have hoped, so they resort to this other tactic, by trying to hurt the adoption of the new OS.

 

I bet HP would feel quite silly if they knew W7 is a MS product.. They need new strategists, like those scroogled guys. They're brilliant!

HPs pc business would be dead if they didn't sell any pcs with windows. Selling an older version of windows hurts the adoption of the new OS,and in turn hurts MS's business.

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I bet HP would feel quite silly if they knew W7 is a MS product.. They need new strategists, like those scroogled guys. They're brilliant!

 

Yep, HP is sure sticking it to Microsoft by continuing to buy all those Win 7 licenses from them! Couldn't possibly have anything to do with demand for Windows 8 being absolutely non-existant, we all know Windows 8 is a huge success and loved by all :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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I'm a fan of Windows 8.x, but obviously there's still a (large) market for Windows 7, so why not offer it? It still has mainstream support for another year.

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HPs pc business would be dead if they didn't sell any pcs with windows. Selling an older version of windows hurts the adoption of the new OS,and in turn hurts MS's business.

Ah.. how did I not see this before, those cunning bastards. I bet they'll undermine W9 by offering W8 as option too. Clever girl, I mean HP.

 

Seriously though, why do you get your knickers in a twist about offering the consumer a choice? Were you the guy that said he gets 3000$ or 4000$ a month from the store a while back?

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excellent article from gizmodo. finally someone in the tech media gets it.

 

Dear HP: Running From the Future Doesn't Help Anyone

http://gizmodo.com/dear-hp-running-from-the-future-doesnt-help-anyone-1505017762

 

Windows 8 hate is outdated

HP's big Windows 7 push feeds on?and perpetuates?the worst kind of cursory Windows 8 hate. Hate that's uninformed, off-the-cuff. Hate that's outdated. Windows 8 launched with its issues, among them the lack of any built-in help for the legions of unwitting users blind-sided by live tiles. It wasn't a great launch.

But the days when Windows 8 was kinda busted are over, to whatever extent they were happening in the first place. The biggest barrier to Windows 8-entry has always been confusion, and Windows 8.1 fixed so many of the little things that made an already tough transition rougher, from the lack of tutorials to tiny-but-crucial UI tweaks. Windows 8, today, is both good and accessible.

Windows 8 isn't going away

This isn't the first time hardware manufacturers have tried to pull this kind of OS switcheroo. Sales of Windows XP computers jumped up during the dark days of Vista. Except Vista eventually disappeared, and Windows 8?or more specifically, Windows 8's tiled interface?isn't going to.

Its name might change, and its successor might already be on the way, but Windows 8 is a transition that there's no going back from, no matter what "Windows 9" might bring. Modern-style apps and touchscreen friendly UI aren't just phases desktop computing is going through, they're the effect of a radical restructuring of what using a computer means. A restructuring that's outside of any one company's control.

Clinging to the old guard is just delaying the inevitable. It also ensures that everyone who's trying to run from the future is only going to be even more hopelessly behind when stalling isn't an option anymore.

Really HP? Come on.

But more than anything it's just a lame move, and one that's disappointing to see from a company that has every reason roll up its sleeves and dive head-first into whatever the future might hold. HP has yet to produce a great phone or tablet, took webOS and drove it straight into the ground, and has a software strategy that seems to involve trying to make bloatware cool through sheer force of will. Likewise, running screaming back to Windows 7 to hold on for dear life is something that's doomed to fail sooner or later. We reached out to HP to see if maybe there's a more optimistic take, but so far no response.

If Windows 8 is really a problem, maybe make a point of helping users cope instead of helping them cower and hide with a plan that?at best?offers temporary comfort. This touchscreen, convertible, tablet-ized moment in desktop history can be scary, sure, but HP should know the score. Playing make-believe isn't a solution. Trying to make the best out of what's coming at least has a chance of being one.

So please HP, don't be an enabler. Or if you're going to retreat, at least pick a route that's not a total dead end.

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Makes sense to put a desktop os onto a desktop pc/laptop. Maybe if enough of this happens it'll tell microsoft to leave tablet things on tablets.

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Wouldnt say this is because of Win8 is a failure.  More so that companies need to do what it can to make money since PC sales are not what they are used to.  More options for consumers.

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turns out, its just a marketing gimmick.

HP bringing back Windows 7 PCs? Not so fast...

This morning's tech news headlines are breathlessly reporting that HP is bringing back Windows 7 "by popular demand." The facts say otherwise: HP never stopped selling Windows 7 PCs, and it's actually selling fewer Windows 7 models today than it did last summer.

http://www.zdnet.com/hp-bringing-back-windows-7-pcs-not-so-fast-7000025351/
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Last week I noticed that the bank terminals inside the bank were all XP. This week I noticed they all had aero on the title bars. I miss Aero it always looked sooooo nice!

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Last week I noticed that the bank terminals inside the bank were all XP. This week I noticed they all had aero on the title bars. I miss Aero it always looked sooooo nice!

It's not too late. ;)

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######.. this windows 8 fanboy/hate is really making me want to stop even coming on the forums anymore.. ######.. it isn't that big a deal.. 

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