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Draggendrop

Apparently the above tweet was in response to....

 

 

 

 

I have a need for good news...so I will post this...

 

Chris Hadfield posted this on /r/SpaceX...

 

Cool new addition to the San Antonio VFR chart

 

ohQhiAE.jpg

 

:)

 

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DocM

Cygnus is SpaceX? Hmmmm....

 

Cool chart :) but San Antonio or San Angelo?

 

NASA has a requalification procedure for upgraded launchers, similar to the USAF, with the number of successful launches of other outfits payloads before they fly it a bit variable.

 

They've decided to fly CRS-8 on the 3rd F9 FT flight. ORBCOMM was #1 and SES-9 will be #2. Jason 3 was the last v1.1 core and doesn't count. Therefore, the SES-9 delay pushes CRS-8 to the right.  

 

 

Edited by DocM
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Draggendrop

I think reddit posters assumed that the consecutive twitters implied Cygnus (March 10th Atlas flight) may have also pushed the date for CRS8, and did not explain why there was a March 10th date push, it is listed as March 10th anyway, as well as having Cygnus (OA6), Dragon(CRS-8) and ....Soyuz (TMA-20M) on the 19th and Progress on the 31st (MS-02) all at the station in a 20 day period. That's a bit busy.

 

Source had it as San Antonio VFR chart, clip is a portion of a large chart with San Antonio as the major hub and San Angelo, as a minor hub north west...will have to look up the VFR chart.

 

I have no idea now.....think it had to do with the CRS supposed delay due to Dragon work, which I have also not heard of....???

 

Flyingskippy would know about the VFR chart

 

:s

 

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DocM

SES-8 is the main driver in CRS-8's lateness. The latter can't launch until the former flies.

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Draggendrop

I'm getting launch withdrawl symptoms...need my SpaceX launch excitement.....Thanks Doc...:D

 

Note...Hopefully we will hear more about CRS-8 and BEAM, am curious as to process involved to get it out of the non pressurized trunk so that the arm can place it in position....EVA maybe.....???

Edited by Draggendrop
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DocM

Getting BEAM out of the trunk is all robotic, no spacewalk necessary. The same Canadarm which berths Dragon 1 can grab on to a similar attachment on BEAM, pull it out, and berth it as well.

 

 

 

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Draggendrop

That will be awesome to see, then to watch it expand and first entrance by the crew. We are in for some great video's with this project. Thank's for posting that.

:D

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Unobscured Vision

As much as we all enjoy SpaceX gear going airborne (hell, anything going airborne for that matter), there's a traffic pattern that needs to be kept tidy.

 

I've got a solution ... :shifty: ... *drumroll*

 

 

 

Get a couple of the "big ones" in orbit with a hub strong enough to link them all together, a few of those lovely Solar Panel Arrays that were proposed as ISS upgrades (lighter, stronger and produced FAR more power per square meter so the arrays didn't need to be as large) ... yeah. :D The video was made a long time ago, I can only imagine what Bigelow and SpaceX could put together now.

 

Oh wait, WE DON'T NEED TO IMAGINE. We've been following the march of technology of both companies. We know what they could put together. :yes: And it would be spectacular.

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Draggendrop

Just a mental blurb.

 

As I see things, SpaceX is under no obligation to give launch dates until ready. We see various sites post guesstimates and all of a sudden it looks legitimate, I am guilty of that sometimes. Now I have seen papers stating delays or changes and speculating, stirring the mud also. The NET dates move as required and SpaceX is busy and hopefully careful.

 

Here is what is roughly listed for the ISS, with SES9 going prior to CRS-8, and this is only an estimate....

 

Quote
February 3, 2016 Russian EVA-42 (Malenchenko, Volkov)
February 19, 2016 Cygnus Orb-4 Unberthing & Free Flight
March 2, 2016 Soyuz M-18M Landing (Volkov, Kornienko, Kelly)
March 10, 2016 Cygnus OA-6 Launch atop Atlas V
March 13, 2016 Cygnus OA-6 Rendezvous, Capture & Berthing to Node 1
March 19, 2016 Soyuz TMA-20M Launch & Docking (Ovchinin, Skripochka, Williams)
March 20, 2016 Dragon SpX-8 Launch atop Falcon 9
March 22, 2016 Dragon SpX-8 Capture & Berthing to Harmony
March 29. 2016 Progress M-29M Undocking from Zvezda
March 31, 2016 Progress MS-2 Launch & Docking to Zvezda
April 22, 2016 Dragon SpX-8 Departure & Landing
April /May Dragon SpX-9
April /May U.S. EVA-36 & 37
May 2, 2016 Cygnus OA-6 Unberthing, Release
May 31, 2016 Cygnus OA-5 Launch atop Antares 230
2016 Relocation of Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 from Node 3P to Node 2Z
June 2, 2016 Cygnus OA-5 Rendezvous, Capture & Berthing to Unity
June 5, 2016 Soyuz TMA-19M Undocking & Landing (Malenchenko, Kopra, Peake)
June 10, 2016 Dragon SpX-10 Launch atop Falcon 9
June 12, 2016 Dragon SpX-10 Rendezvous, Capture & Berthing to Node 1

http://spaceflight101.com/iss/iss-calendar/

 

This is one of the articles that stirs the mud a little, IMHO....

http://floridapolitics.com/archives/200145-nasa-prepping-for-next-orbital-atk-resupply-mission-skipping-spacex

 

????

:)

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Unobscured Vision

With the traffic lane around the ISS being what it is, there's no great need for SpaceX to get a launch in right now. They've got many irons in the fire.

 

If anything, I would put my guess on everyone at Hawthorne taking closer looks at the Landing Leg Lockdown that failed on the previous landing. I wanted to see a 1.1 pull off a clean landing on an ASDS before that line was retired. If not for that stupid lockdown mechanism, that landing would have succeeded.

 

So my guess is that's what they're doing, and there's no pressure on SpaceX to do a CRS launch right now. :D 

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Draggendrop

Quite right. I would rather that they take their time, get SES9 up safely and land the first stage...then have the BEAM safely stowed in the trunk of Dragon, we don't need any vibration problems.

 

The ISS is lucky to have all freighters up and running...no shortage of supplies, by any means.

:)

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Unobscured Vision
2 minutes ago, Draggendrop said:

Quite right. I would rather that they take their time, get SES9 up safely and land the first stage...then have the BEAM safely stowed in the trunk of Dragon, we don't need any vibration problems.

 

The ISS is lucky to have all freighters up and running...no shortage of supplies, by any means.

:)

In fact, the cadence may have to slow down a bit. They've got enough trout and hush puppies in the freezer to last six years. ;) 

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Draggendrop

It does take a lot of time to dock, release, unload and load. It will be better when the 7th crew member is implemented. This all takes away from science time. Commercial crew will make a huge impact...(metaphorically..not literally).  :woot: 

 

Note:   It would be nice to have a second BEAM module for a "space shed".

Edited by Draggendrop
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Unobscured Vision

It all depends on how much of a systems impact the first one makes (positive and negative), how much stress the first one places on the ISS superstructure itself, reboosting performance, etc. There's a lot to take into account.

 

Perhaps it's time for the Commercial Space Station plans to begin taking shape. The ISS is starting to look like a Tinker Toy set (or a bonafide mess) by comparison, and NewSpace has several very good designs that are all technically feasible now. :yes: 

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Draggendrop

Yes, it would be ideal to have a Bigelow cislunar unit up asap, and start shifting science and infrastructure...before the 2024 time frame. We need the FHFT up and running goodies. I would think that the lunar ambition would come after this....

 

:D

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Draggendrop

bits and bytes....

 

Elon was at the Hyperloop awards today, and left a few bits of info...will have to get the stream when published for confirmation...unless someone publishes, but appears FHFT delayed till late summer...and something about electric vehicles for Mars excursions.

 

Quote

SpaceX founder Elon Musk made a surprise appearance at the competition, answering questions and thanking the teams.

 http://www.theeagle.com/hyperloop/awards-announced-at-hyperloop-pod-competition-a-m-team-moving/article_80ef0982-c7a0-11e5-9642-a35043e4a9f8.html

 

-------------- for the boat people like me....Port Canaveral full of tugs and support ships around  OCISLU, which also has finished a test excursion and is back in port.

 

support ship shots for giggles...

 

hD5lVvO.jpg

 

 

z506JIK.jpg

 

 

8AxP6tR.jpg

 

 

4zLNs2L.jpg

 

:D

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Draggendrop

SpaceX Wins 2016 Space Achievement Award

 

Quote

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (Feb. 1, 2016) - In December 2015, SpaceX, a known pioneer in the space industry, successfully landed the first stage of its Falcon 9 rocket. The Falcon 9 left Cape Canaveral in Florida, delivered 11 satellites to orbit and historically landed the first stage minutes later. For that achievement, the Space Foundation has selected SpaceX to receive one of its top honors, the 2016 Space Achievement Award.

 

"Space is a risky business, but SpaceX continues to push the envelope in innovation, moving humanity forward. The work being done by SpaceX will reduce cost and overhead for space travel, making exploration more accessible," said Space Foundation Chief Executive Officer Elliot Pulham.

 

The Space Achievement Award recognizes individuals or organizations for breakthrough space technology or critical milestones in the evolution of space exploration and development.  

 

Quote

Recipients over the past few years have included:
2015 X-37B OTV Team
2014 U.S. Air Force GPS Team
2013 NOAA
2012 Junichiro Kawaguchi, Ph.D., JAXA
2011 SpaceX and Telecom sans Frontieres
2010 Hubble Space Telescope Repair Mission Team

The 2016 Space Achievement Award will be presented on April 11 during the opening ceremony of the 32nd Space Symposium at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo., USA. The opening ceremony is co-sponsored by Northrop Grumman, and features presentation of top Space Foundation awards.

About the Space Symposium
To be held April 11-14, the Space Symposium is the annual must-attend gathering of all sectors of the global space community. Visit www.SpaceSymposium.org for secure online registration and complete conference information. A discount on standard industry registration is currently available if paid by March 11, 2016.

http://www.spacefoundation.org/media/press-releases/spacex-wins-2016-space-achievement-award

 

SpaceX have won it twice now.....excellent....:D

 

-------------------------------

 

Media and forum speculation...

 

The following is just my opinion....

 

SpaceX is a private company and is not required to post progress reports about everything they do. For the most part, they have given us information to be helpful and I have been more than happy about that. SpaceX is continually innovating and problems will invariably crop up and need to be solved. This does not imply that they are required to report everything, every time something happens and delays a launch. I, for one, like them to take their time and get the cadence up...when ready. Do I want to see a launch every month?, ...yes...I would like a launch anytime, but only when they are ready and we are set for a show. This is why I wish some media sources will give it a rest, as SpaceX is well aware of the costs of delays and customer satisfaction and are doing their best.

 

Case in point about the media ...

 

Delays in SpaceX Falcon 9 Upgrade schedule raise concerns

http://spacenews.com/delays-in-spacex-falcon-9-upgrade-schedule-raises-concerns/

 

Customers Edgy as SpaceX’s Schedule Slips; Falcon Heavy Flight Delayed Again

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/02/01/customers-edgy-spacex-schedule-slips-falcon-heavy-flight-delayed-again/

 

IMHO.....Media needs to relax...they will launch when ready.

 

:)

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DocM

There's a new rocket with a few gremlins.  Better to squash these gremlins now than be reckless. The SpaceX customers know what's going on, L2 is starting to get general info and the space media need headlines but can go fish. Musk will tweet when they're ready to share.

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

Yeah, I agree. I read an article on SpaceNews.com that made me want to assault my screen. It was so condescending and anti-SpaceX about the "delays" and how "commercial customers are becoming concerned" ... ugh. It's more SpaceNews being SpaceNews; and we already know they are ULA-slanted.

 

If customers are concerned, why are sales so good? SpaceX does not need to justify to anyone but the customers, and iirc this "lull" was planned anyway. They weren't due for a launch until mid-February; it got moved due to ISS traffic patterns. Another commercial flight has been shifted to March, as is SpaceX's discretion.

 

Nothing to see, far as I'm concerned.

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Beittil

It really depends on which author is behind the article though. Normally you can expect a guy like Jeff Foust to be pretty impartial for example, but in the case of this article you have Peter B. de Selding whom I always find to be more on Arianespace's hand while others at SN are indeed more ULA minded.

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DocM
10 minutes ago, Beittil said:

It really depends on which author is behind the article though. Normally you can expect a guy like Jeff Foust to be pretty impartial for example, but in the case of this article you have Peter B. de Selding whom I always find to be more on Arianespace's hand while others at SN are indeed more ULA minded.

Yup, and look at who buys much of their ad space. 

 

 

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DocM

http://m.gazette.com/colorado-springs-based-space-foundation-will-again-give-top-award-to-spacex/article/1569056

 

Quote

 

The Space Foundation in Colorado Springs will again give its top award for innovation to upstart rocket firm SpaceX.

 

The space achievement award, announced Monday, honors SpaceX for its Falcon 9 rocket's successful December mission. The mission also resulted in the company getting a certificate that allows it to compete for Air Force Space Command launches.

 

"The Falcon 9 left Cape Canaveral in Florida, delivered 11 satellites to orbit and historically landed the first stage minutes later," the foundation said in a news release.


SpaceX had another Falcon 9 launch in January that put a sea-tracking satellite in orbit for the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, but the reusable first stage failed to properly land on a platform at sea.

 

"Space is a risky business, but SpaceX continues to push the envelope in innovation, moving humanity forward," Space Foundation CEO Elliot Pulham said in a statement. "The work being done by SpaceX will reduce cost and overhead for space travel, making exploration more accessible."

 

The award is the second for Hawthorne, Calif.-based SpaceX, which received plaudits from the foundation in 2011.

 

Founded by high-tech billionaire Elon Musk, SpaceX is offering the first competition in years for Centennial rocket-maker United Launch Alliance, which has had a hammerlock on military launches.

 

Musk is likely to be on hand April 11 when the award is handed over at the start of the Foundation's Space Symposium, which will draw thousands of space industry experts and top military leaders to The Broadmoor.

 

 

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Draggendrop

Wow...Beittil....that was one big bucket of news......happy dance time.....:woot:

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