Microsoft working on "total update" to File Explorer for Windows 10.


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Microsoft's GM of Core UX for Windows Desktop, Tablet and Phone has confirmed on Twitter that Microsoft is working on a new "total" update for File Explorer on Windows 10.

Many users of Windows 10 have been quick to complain that File Explorer remains a huge pain point on touch based systems such as the Surface Pro, and Surfacebook.

 

 

It is not know when this update will be made available for Insiders and Consumers, but it's nice to know that Microsoft has acknowledged user feedback, and working to improve the modern UX experience on Windows 10.

 

More: http://mspoweruser.com/microsoft-working-major-update-file-explorer-windows-10/

Edited by Dot Matrix
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49 minutes ago, jjkusaf said:

Great...possibly more dumbing down to appease "touch" users.  /sigh

I wouldn't say they'll be dumbing down anything.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

I wouldn't say they'll be dumbing down anything.

 

 

They've failed to deliver so far ... after what ... 3 and a half years?  Though I am curious what "industry existence proofs" Peter is referring to?

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I hope they have something to show at Build. The last time someone talked about this was in 2014 when the Insider program just started so there should be something on the table at this point. I remember the article from WinBeta. (Link.) I know there was a Neowin article too, but I couldn't find it. I did a concept. I still think DAKirby309's V4 File Explorer concept is the best, but would be improved upon if when the windows size got smaller it changed to a mobile layout similar to the Twitter app.

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I am surprised him/Microsoft talking about it publicly like this, especially when build is only a week away.

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8 minutes ago, neufuse said:

If I have to see a stupid splash screen every time I open a folder up I am going to scream

 

splash screens need to die! Even MS said they were dead years ago.....

That's before they became "modern" again.  Gotta keep up with the times!  mmmm..calculator splash screen.

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19 minutes ago, jjkusaf said:

They've failed to deliver so far ... after what ... 3 and a half years?  Though I am curious what "industry existence proofs" Peter is referring to?

3 1/2 years?! Windows 10 has only been on the market since last year!

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7 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

3 1/2 years?! Windows 10 has only been on the market since last year!

Funny...you forgot this whole thing (one OS/Apps for all devices) started with Windows 8.  I've been trying to forget that one as well.

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I wouldn't say they'll be dumbing down anything.

 

Judging by the "modern", touch-friendly "apps"... yes they will... these "apps" are a huge pain for non-touch systems by the way... I don't ever see you posting about that...

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3 minutes ago, jjkusaf said:

Funny...you forgot this whole thing (one OS/Apps for all devices) started with Windows 8.  I've been trying to forget that one as well.

Microsoft never achieved unity with Windows 8. This all started with Windows 10.

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10 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

3 1/2 years?! Windows 10 has only been on the market since last year!

Yeah but its been in development since before 2014 when it was announced at Build.

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9 minutes ago, jjkusaf said:

Funny...you forgot this whole thing (one OS/Apps for all devices) started with Windows 8.  I've been trying to forget that one as well.

Windows 8 can "arguably" be called the start, but MS never said Windows 8 would have unity. they always said it was to lay the foundation. for unity. the main OS experience was going to get similar to give users a feel of uniformity, but for actual universality it was a mere foundation layer for things to come later and build on it. like the true kernel unification with 10. , and then full unification through incremental upgrade to 10 over the years. 

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16 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

Microsoft never achieved unity with Windows 8. This all started with Windows 10.

I understand that ... but this whole tragic convergence between PC/Mobile started with 8.  I'm not necessarily talking about Apps (since we are discussing a UI/UX "File Explorer" element).  The UI/UX most certainly did start with Windows 8.

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49 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

I wouldn't say they'll be dumbing down anything.

 

 

 

From the standpoint of features and functionality metro apps have been an epic failure from beginning to end, today they are called UWA but it's all still junky old metro with a new name.

 

The modern desktop continues to be dragged backwards in time just to appease the touch users.

 

 

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Why is everyone making the assumption it's going to be a modern app?  Fun fact, Windows has been touch capable for many many years, long before Modern was even a thing, never mind they'd suddenly kill off hundreds (if not more) shell extensions and cause all sorts of other breakage.  I've been using Windows based tablets since around 2002, no Modern required.. lets see what they actually come up with before copy/pasting the same old rhetoric as a larf. 

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3 minutes ago, Max Norris said:

Why is everyone making the assumption it's going to be a modern app?  Fun fact, Windows has been touch capable for many many years, long before Modern was even a thing, never mind they'd suddenly kill off hundreds (if not more) shell extensions and cause all sorts of other breakage.  I've been using Windows based tablets since around 2002, no Modern required.. lets see what they actually come up with before copy/pasting the same old rhetoric as a larf. 

Pretty sure the guy posted another tweet saying it was going to be UWP. 

 

Edit: Yup! https://twitter.com/peterskillman/status/711656951961100288 

 

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50 minutes ago, kozukumi said:

Pretty sure the guy posted another tweet saying it was going to be UWP. 

 

Edit: Yup! https://twitter.com/peterskillman/status/711656951961100288 

 

yep, saw that tweet as well.  Makes me sad. :(  I like the file explorer ... I like it in Windows 10.  Going to be a shame when UWP destroys it as well.

 

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11 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

As they should be. UWP will be much more capable than legacy desktop.

LOLz.

 

Three and half years of Metro, Modern, Universal Apps .... when is this happening?

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1 hour ago, jjkusaf said:

yep, saw that tweet as well.  Makes me sad. :(  I like the file explorer ... I like it in Windows 10.  Going to be a shame when UWP destroys it as well.

 

I don't think you know what UWP is, or what being UWP means. because it doesn't mean what you think it does judging from you posts here. 

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1 hour ago, jjkusaf said:

LOLz.

 

Three and half years of Metro, Modern, Universal Apps .... when is this happening?

So yeah. I was right, you don't know what UWP is.

 

first the old windos Apps are far more capable than you are aware, and while there aren't many, there are very powerful and very advanced windows apps. however UWP's while they sort of include the old windows apps to some degree, that's not what they are, they are so much more. 

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11 minutes ago, HawkMan said:

So yeah. I was right, you don't know what UWP is.

 

first the old windos Apps are far more capable than you are aware, and while there aren't many, there are very powerful and very advanced windows apps. however UWP's while they sort of include the old windows apps to some degree, that's not what they are, they are so much more. 

The evolution is the same...no?  The UWP framework was in 8.1?  No? 

 

Which "advanced" windows apps are you referring to?  Which "advanced" UWP's are you referring to?

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1 hour ago, HawkMan said:

So yeah. I was right, you don't know what UWP is.

 

first the old windos Apps are far more capable than you are aware, and while there aren't many, there are very powerful and very advanced windows apps. however UWP's while they sort of include the old windows apps to some degree, that's not what they are, they are so much more. 

 

And yet every single glorified metro app has shown to be missing a vast amount of features and functionality when compared to win32 programs.

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      Forza Horizon 5 has been an immensely successful launch for Microsoft with over 10 million players in its launch week. Meanwhile, those who prefer the aerial route will be happy to know that the Reno Air Race: Expansion Pack and Reno Air Race: Full Collection have become available for purchase on the Microsoft Flight Simulator Marketplace today for $19.99 and $59.99 respectively. Microsoft Flight Simulator: Game of the Year Edition has become available too. Fans of Xbox Cloud Gaming will also be pleased to know that the feature has launched on Xbox Series X|S and Xbox One.

      Living on the Edge
      We had lots of news regarding Microsoft Edge this week. Starting off with the most controversial one, Microsoft essentially admitted that it is purposely making it difficult to change the default browser in Windows, especially in the Search experience. The company indicated highlighted that:

      This does not bode well for people who want to avoid Edge at all costs. It also means that the Redmond tech giant will be blocking further workarounds from third-party developers designed to circumvent its restrictions.

      In some slightly more positive news, we learned that Microsoft is experimenting with an enhanced CTRL+F toggle and a Citations tool in Edge. The former can now find related words for you while the latter enables you to grab information from a website and assign it a citation format like APA or MLA.

      The browser is also getting a bunch of shopping-related features in the coming days, including information on ethically sourced products, price drops, an "efficiency mode" to conserve system resources, and an "easy update" capability to quickly change your compromised passwords. The Android variant of the browser will also give you the ability to authenticate before autofilling fields.

      Dev Channel
      Microsoft has restored WSATools to the Microsoft Store - the app allows you to easily sideload APKs on Windows 11 Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) Preview version 0.50.2 is now live with a logo featuring an familiar mascot and an updated Linux kernel Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice has received ray tracing, DLSS, FSR, and more on PC

      Microsoft has noted that Intel's Smart Sound Technology (SST) is causing BSODs on some Windows 11 PCs, a compatibility hold will be applied until you update your drivers

      Following backlash from the community, the new Whiteboard app will be replaced by the older UWP one

      Microsoft will launch Teams Phone with Calling Plan for businesses in 2022

      Under the spotlight
      We have effectively wrapped up our Closer Look series for Windows 11 until Microsoft releases some new features worth covering in more detail. While the OS isn't a home run, there is still a lot to love about it. You can read more about the top five features of Windows 11 that I really like. And be on the look out for five features I hate tomorrow!

      This week, Asher had a look at the Xbox Series X version of Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy, and as you probably know by now, the game's not a home run either, quite the opposite actually. There are a bunch of issues plaguing this release but on the brighter side, Rockstar Games has issued an apology, pledged to fix its latest release with updates, and promised to restore the classic versions of all three games.

      Finally, if you have updated to Chrome 96 and want to enjoy Windows 11-style menus with rounded corners in the browser on Windows 10 or 11, check out Neowin's handy and brief guide here.

      Logging off
      This week's most interesting item deals with Xbox chief Phil Spencer sharing his thoughts on the use of non-fungible tokens (NFTs) in gaming. Simply stated, he's not a fan and thinks that their use seems to be exploitative rather than something that can boost entertainment value. That said, the executive has not completely closed the door on incorporating NFTs in gaming, he just doesn't like it in its current state of infancy.



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