SpaceX Super Heavy and Starship updates


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Jim K

 

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Unobscured Vision

Well, Elon did say 2019 ...

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DocM

But the idea of 2 flight vehicles appearing within 6 months, and a Super Heavy starting construction this year too....

 

So much for the "no BFR for 10 years"  crowd.....

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Unobscured Vision

Yep ... their dreams of "BFR Vaporware" are vaporware.

 

And those renders ... whooo!

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DocM

The view of SpaceX's Boca Chica launch complex from South Padre Island, which has built an amphitheater facing it. You can see StarHopper left of center.

 

 

 

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DocM

I see a propellant tank dome and parts for another in these drone shots 

 

Crop

1948866757_BFHstanddome1024.thumb.jpg.359f414412587d7f84b5687b6cee1d85.jpg

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anthdci

I wonder how they will move it to somewhere it can hop from? That concrete base it's currently sitting on looks a bit close to the hanger if they light 3 engines. 

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DocM
13 hours ago, anthdci said:

I wonder how they will move it to somewhere it can hop from? That concrete base it's currently sitting on looks a bit close to the hanger if they light 3 engines. 

 

Scheuerle, Mammoet,  Hyundai etc. modular self-propelled mobile transporter (SPMT).  NASA, industry, house movers, etc.  Put several modules together, or two  with a platform, and you're in business.

 

Comparison: V2 missile vs StarHopper

 

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DocM

The nose cone and development  engines have been removed, so it's likely the common bulkhead, upper dome and plumbing work is next.

 

As the NSF article states, the horizontal Raptor test stand has been completely reworked. It's been greatly beefed up, re-plumbed, and received a larger engine mounting plate.

 

This together with Musk stating the "radically redesigned Raptor"  has 100,000 hp (74.6MW) of turbopump power vs. the 36,208 hp (27MW) of the development engines, indicates it's a friggin' beast.

Edited by DocM
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flyingskippy

What could you expect in thrust from that much hp?

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DocM
3 hours ago, flyingskippy said:

What could you expect in thrust from that much hp?

 

BOTE, the "not radically redesigned" Raptor engine should deliver about 375,000 lbf at 250 bar, with growth to 448,000 lbf at 300 bar - both running on CH4. 

 

The "radically redesigned" Raptor may beat that, but it depends on what was redesigned. More power, or just lighter for a higher thrust/weight? They ain't talking. Yet.

 

SSME* at 206 bar using LH2 delivered 418,000 lbf.

 

* Space Shuttle Main Engine, AKA RS-25

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Unobscured Vision

Yep I was just gonna say it's for future-proofing, plus they needed a beefier setup anyway.

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DocM

WHOA!!!!!

 

Assurances aside, this doesn't bode well for Hawthorne and California once Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy are retired.

 

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-spacex-port-of-la-20190116-story.html

 

Quote

In blow to Los Angeles, SpaceX is moving its Mars spaceship and booster work to Texas

 

In a reversal of a deal local officials touted as a win for Los Angeles tech, SpaceX will no longer be developing and building its Mars spaceship and rocket booster system at the Port of Los Angeles. Instead, the work will be done in South Texas.

SpaceX said in a statement Wednesday that the decision was made to "streamline operations."

"This decision does not impact our current manufacture, design, and launch operations in Hawthorne and Vandenberg Air Force Base," a company spokesperson said in the statement. "Additionally, SpaceX will continue recovery operations of our reusable Falcon rockets and Dragon spacecraft at the Port of Los Angeles."
>

 


 

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Beittil

I know LA has a large pool of talented tech workers, but to me it never really made sense to build this thing in LA to begin with. South Texas anyways seemed like the more logical choice. 

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DocM

Not to mention the taxation levels in Cali are likely to skyrocket soon. 

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