Why don't you use Ubuntu?


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Slimy

From what I can tell, Ubuntu is currently the most popular distro out there. What I'd like to know is if you are a Linux user that chooses not to use Ubuntu, what are your reasons?

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Janitor

I don't want to leave WLM, or PS CS2.. Hmm i'm sure there's a few other apps aswell and WINE seems like a pain

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h3xis

I dislike the philosophy, the staff, and the sugar coating.

Debian ftw

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Iridium

I am a gobolinux user. Ubuntu is really good, but they continue as with all the other countless distros out there to use a directory structure that is based on a 1960 server OS design. I think that its time to get rid of package managers and allow the directory tree to serve as its own package manager. Ubuntu continues to hide the weaknesses of this hierarchy under pretty desktop effects and other modern OS features. If they want me to take their distro seriously they need to break away from the mold and really make a change that will pave their way to the forefront of desktop PC's. Instead of sending files all over the place programs should be kept in their own directory. This will allow, easy installation and direct user removal of unwanted or obsolete software, and all distros to unite under a single package format so that it is easier for developers to target Linux as a whole.

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Cormier6083

PS3 setup is really hard.

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h3xis
I am a gobolinux user. Ubuntu is really good, but they continue as with all the other countless distros out there to use a directory structure that is based on a 1960 server OS design. I think that its time to get rid of package managers and allow the directory tree to serve as its own package manager. Ubuntu continues to hide the weaknesses of this hierarchy under pretty desktop effects and other modern OS features. If they want me to take their distro seriously they need to break away from the mold and really make a change that will pave their way to the forefront of desktop PC's. Instead of sending files all over the place programs should be kept in their own directory. This will allow, easy installation and direct user removal of unwanted or obsolete software, and all distros to unite under a single package format so that it is easier for developers to target Linux as a whole.

I looked gobolinux up and that's incredibly strange. How do things not break? Is there not a /usr/bin or /usr/lib?

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Angel Blue01

There's something about the project itself that I don't like, a phylosophical problem... that has slipped my mind

one huge thing is the insitence on FLOSS which means so much more work to get it usable out the box but that's slowly being made easier.

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Rob2687

Not even Chuck Norris could unite all the distros.

Apt-get works better than any other package manager I've tried anyways.

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Mike

simple reason: i have no need to be helped while installing things in linux, i don't need things looked after for me etc

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Matthew S.

:/ I think I like the idea behind the gobolinux filesystem hierarchy :)

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Xerxes

I don't use Ubuntu because the current builds are unstable and crashes all the time (it doesn't like my hardware setup for some reason, there is one or more pieces of hardware I have that seems to be not compatible)

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David Scaife

Ubuntu is not aimed at all Linux users. It is an attempt to make Linux more home-user-friendly, and in doing that, the distribution's market is moving away from enthusiasts.

I don't use Ubuntu simply because I like to know exactly what's going on in my computer. I like Arch's package manager which lets me choose very easily between downloading pre-compiled packages or compiling them myself. When I install a system, I enjoy the challenge of configuring my computer up manually (I know Arch doesn't compare to Slackware or LFS in that regard, but I plan on experiencing them when I have the time).

From what I've seen, Ubuntu quite simply wouldn't give me what I want from a Linux distro (at least, not as well as my current distro does).

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kyro

I got introduced to Redhat company 8 years ago, I got trained in it, the company I work has all hundreds of its servers on Redhat based distros and I like to work with RPM and YUM because i Know how to make it work and It works for me easily.

BTW Fedora 6 was really disappointing for laptop user point_of_view so I used Opensuse 10.2 briefly but now Back on Fedora7 still not good. Fedora8 test3 is KICKING A$$ specially for laptop point_of_view and they are focussing specially on it. The NEW GDM theme ROCKS the nokoda theme rocks (not window_border though but as Compiz starts u dont have to see that).

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Jase

Can't run photoshop without wine.

Cant play Counter-strike source.

Cant use webcam and mic in a messenger client

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Glowstick
I am a gobolinux user. Ubuntu is really good, but they continue as with all the other countless distros out there to use a directory structure that is based on a 1960 server OS design.

The Unix directory hierarchy still makes way more sense than the unregulated crap in Windows. Also, these days, every *nix system has at least a volume manager and a filesystem that supports online expansion, so there's no excuse for crying about running out of diskspace in / or /usr.

Also, what is it with you reading impaired clownshoes that are obviously Windows users and posting about why they're not using Linux? The thread is about Linux users and why they did not chose Ubuntu.

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xxxxxx.xxxxxx

I don't use Ubuntu because of all its sugar coated niceness. I don't want my OS to control the way I do things, I want to do it all my way.

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PL_
I don't want to leave WLM, or PS CS2.. Hmm i'm sure there's a few other apps aswell and WINE seems like a pain
Can't run photoshop without wine.

Cant play Counter-strike source.

Cant use webcam and mic in a messenger client

I think the question was if you're a Linux user that doesn't use Ubuntu ;)

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Glowstick
I looked gobolinux up and that's incredibly strange. How do things not break? Is there not a /usr/bin or /usr/lib?

I'm sure it makes heavy use of the LD_* environment variables. If you'd clutter up the filesystem with symlinks of what you're trying to avoid, there's no point in a newfangled hierarchy.

If it doesn't redirect the linker into all directions of the sky, then it probably won't work well with external precompiled packages.

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randomnut

I bought into all the hype before I tried it, and it was a big let down. The whole OS just seemed like something coded in someone's bedroom, I still found a lot of things hard to do, couldn't get on with gnome and found kde in kubuntu very poorly implemented.

I find openSUSE 100x better than ubuntu on all of it's claims of user-friendliness and the thing just looks damn sexy. Dual booting windows and suse at the moment, it's a pleasure to use.

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Barney T.

IMHO, Ubuntu is a great initial distro to get your feet wet in initially using Linux. However, as time goes on, many users get more familiar with the ways Linux works, and seek more knowledge on the inner workings, manipulating settings and packages. More challenging distros peak the interest of users, so they move on.

Ubuntu wasn't around when I got into using Linux. And I have enjoyed the challenge of learning the OS instead of having it being "dummied down" for me.

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Miuku.

Used SuSE for 10 years already, I have no need to change.

On that note, Debian and Ubuntus 32/64 arch system is still a joke (or rather, non-existant) - if you need to use mixed 32/64 apps you're essentially screwed and one of the reasons I have no need for it.

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markjensen

I cut my teeth on Red Hat. So, when I learned Linux, I learned it the Red Hat way.

It just feels more comfortable to me now than other distros that I have tried, because I am so used to it.

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xithium

For me, one of the big reasons for using Linux was a much greater level of control over the OS. I don't want to be constantly battling with the OS and I don't want unnecessary bloat. I'm not saying Ubuntu is particularly bad in this respect (certainly nothing as bad as Windows), but Ubuntu generally holds your hand a little more, and tends to be a little more bloated than some other distros. To be fair you could aim those criticisms at other similar distros such as Fedora, Mandriva and OpenSuSE, but in its quest to be a top desktop system, Ubuntu perhaps takes it a little further. Ubuntu sees its primary competition as Windows and Mac OS, and not so much other Linux distros.

I think Ubuntu is fantastic at what it does, it takes the top quality tools of Debian (such as APT), and up to date packages from Debian Sid and builds a polished and user friendly system on top of that well established base. I have it installed on my parents' machine and it's perfect for them.

For more, I prefer the slightly more optimised and finer control characteristics of other distros like Arch, Gentoo, straight Debian etc... The trade-off of course is that the user has to a lot more of the work in those distros.

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Bawx

I don't know how to install it.

Do I download it, burn it to a CD, then start up my PC with it in, and some menu will pop up?

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StandingInAlley
I don't know how to install it.

Do I download it, burn it to a CD, then start up my PC with it in, and some menu will pop up?

Basically u download the image and burn the iso on a cd. Then you boot your computer from this cd.

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/installing

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