Why don't you use Ubuntu?


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Stokkolm
then read the OP and gtfo. jesus.

Take a deep breath and calm down. This thread is a little bit off topic with everybody talking about why they aren't using Ubuntu, whether they are on Windows or another Linux distro. It's not that big of a deal, this is a conversation.

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Yorak
Why don't I use Ubuntu ? because I use another distro that is called WinXP . :whistle:

Ubuntu is probably too advanced for you. :rofl:

The reason I don't use Ubuntu is that I like to build my Linux install from the ground up. Arch Linux lets me do this just perfectly. The only thing (in my opinion) that Ubuntu has over competitors is the best driver support preinstalled. Now, other distros are catching up. I do believe it is probably the most friendly distro to beginners, however.

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exUBERance

i agree ^_^ ubuntu is for those people who,like me, enjoy getting the maximum expireince out of their home PC :p

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spacer

No games = no use (for me)

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Glowstick
Firstly i said that i use Gobo but yes i also love my XP to death. Secondly the symlinks are just in place because packages are not compiled for the gobo-hierarchy if they were the symlinks would disappear. Thirdly, and this may hurt somewhat, but the fsf and open source developers are trying to break ties with die hard Linux users who are trying to hold back development.

I don't see how a verbose directory structure will change that. Users that don't have much of a clue of computers don't care what's below ~ and how it's spelled. Those that may care are probably versed enough in computer stuff and don't mind that, because it's less to type.

As far as non-usage goes, I don't use Ubuntu because I hate hand-holding. The only thing it's good for is for supplying an easy to maintain Linux userland to run closed source crap in.

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BlueFiberOptics

I put Ubuntu on my notebook and wanted to use it as my main OS for entertainment and web surfing. Unfortunately, my needs are a bit more specific than a normal user. It takes way too much time and effort to get Ubuntu working the way I want it. However, I still am excited about future Ubuntu releases.

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ScottKin
:o Does that include BSD?

As a matter of fact, I do have one more spare system that I plan to install OpenBSD on - but first things first: I need to tear-down and rebuild this beast:

cpqproliant1.jpg

I need to clear all three of the System Interlocks to get this baby fired up. Nice specs:

- 4 Pentium II Xeon processors

- 8GB ECC RAM

- 5 x 9.1GB SCSI LVL3 drives in hardware RAID0, with room for 11 more drives

- Dual Redundant 750W Power Supplies.

So much fun!!

--ScottKin

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exUBERance

PFTAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

no games = no use to me

http://loll.sourceforge.net/linux/links/Games/index.html

http://linux.strangegamer.com/index.php?title=Game_List

and on top of that, most MMORPG's run on linux AND WINE will run Vista only games such as crysis and every other Windows games plus the perhaps billions of linux only games ;) do some research before you say something that offensive :p

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ichi

I don't like not being able to configure all programs the way I like (well actually I can, but not through the package manager). I've been using gentoo for years now and I'm used to the functionality and look&feel of the programs when built with my options.

Also sometimes the package manager is just not flexible enough (eg. it doesn't seem to be possible to have both e16 and e17 installed at the same time, using the package manager).

I'm giving 7.10 a try on my laptop though, just out of curiosity.

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PGHammer
And Vector Linux is Slackware based - two totally different distributions, what's your point? Debian is completely different from Ubuntu. Nothing is sugar coated and the philosophy is what I like the most about it. As grouchy as the community is, I love it and I fit in perfectly well. I'll even admit that I'm a distribution snob. So what?

I was simply pointing out that your *issues* with Ubuntu as a distribution are, in fact, non-issues.

Ubuntu and Classic Debian are aimed at different audiences; however, there is nothing that keeps someone from using Ubuntu as a classic Debian distribution, should they choose to.

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PGHammer
Not even Chuck Norris could unite all the distros.

Apt-get works better than any other package manager I've tried anyways.

Ubuntu includes apt-get (in addition to Synaptic), just like any other Debian-based distribution. The rather shocking thing about Ubuntu is that it's based on Debian, NOT the supposedly more newbie-friendly RH/Mandriva RPM system (I first cut my Linux eyeteeth on RedHat 7.2). The fact that Ubuntu grows as the user does is definitely not a bad thing; the fact that it's more newbie-friendly than either RedHat or Mandriva will be a shocker.

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seta-san

linux certainly has a learning curve. it took me several converting attempts before i really got comfortable with it. Today i'm comfortable with linux but i'm still duel booting it with Vista.

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PGHammer
that is one MAJOR reason i dislike using ubuntu personally. i have over 4000 mp3s. i'm not about to convert them all to ogg.

and that's my other reason. it's TOO simple. you CAN'T do things the hard way when for me that's the good way for a lot of stuff.

those 2 things are really the only reasons why i dislike ubuntu, or rather just don't use it. i think the concept of it is great for linux n00bs, but being that i learned how to tweak my XF86Config* when i was 7 years old, i just prefer things like that sometimes.

*quick history lesson: back in the 90s before X.Org, we used XFree86 for a GUI layer. /etc/xorg.conf is X.Org's version of XF86Config. it shares the exact same syntax as XF86Config, if you're curious as to what i'm talking about.

You can still do things from the command line; in fact, that's the only way to do some things (updating video drivers, for example, can only be done from the command-line).

Who needs to convert all the MP3s to OGG? While I don't have anywhere near that many MP3s, I simply downloaded the codecs for MP3 playback, and started listening away (my own MP3s that I listen to most often are on my Windows Vista partition, which is NTFS; converting them to OGG, even from Windows, is a nonstarter). The reason Ubuntu didn't include the codecs for listening to MP3s was entirely due to licensing issues (in fact, most distributions don't include them these days; however, in every case, you can download them post-install).

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h3xis
I was simply pointing out that your *issues* with Ubuntu as a distribution are, in fact, non-issues.

Ubuntu and Classic Debian are aimed at different audiences; however, there is nothing that keeps someone from using Ubuntu as a classic Debian distribution, should they choose to.

Saying that my issues are non-issues is silly and comes down to user preference. Joe Schmoe may not give a damn about Ubuntu's philosophy, while someone else will and that's enough for them to not use it. Ubuntu includes non-free proprietary drivers, which violates Debian's philosophy. That alone is enough to not make someone use Ubuntu. There's also the fact that Ubuntu doesn't allow me to run as root, without any sort of tweaking. Ubuntu is built around using "sudo." I hate sudo with a passion and should not have to commit to any tweaking to get around using it, but I digress. You are right in your last sentence, but then that applies to every distro based on Debian. I could ask why people don't use Xandros over Ubuntu.

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Unholy Moley!

I'd like to, but I can't because "failed to set xfermode" is a little error that renders my hard drives inoperable. Kernel worked before, no longer does, somebody broke something. I'll get to using Linux again once somebody comes along and fixes it.

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h3xis
I'd like to, but I can't because "failed to set xfermode" is a little error that renders my hard drives inoperable. Kernel worked before, no longer does, somebody broke something. I'll get to using Linux again once somebody comes along and fixes it.

I don't mean to sound cheeky when I say this but why not fix it yourself? Maybe you could build your own custom kernel?

edit: Perhaps you may find this useful.

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Glowstick
I don't mean to sound cheeky when I say this but why not fix it yourself? Maybe you could build your own custom kernel?

This involves him first finding out what is causing his problem, then trying to figure out how to recompile the kernel, and if all doesn't help, he's supposed to code a fix for himself? No surprise that everyone is laughing at the Linux community. Things have to work out of the box for the generic consumer. Updates breaking basic stuff like this is a big no-no.

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darkz

i dislike the whole packages beeing compiled as i386.

however i was a debian user for, uhm, 2years or so. now im back on winxp (for another 2years or so) and happy as hell

windows somewhat takes much less time to get things going

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James7
i dislike the whole packages beeing compiled as i386.

Just curious----what do you mean by that?

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guruparan

I use Ubuntu via Virtual PC 2007 in my Vista...i simply use it for 30 mins..

My mainstream desktop/laptop has vista in it...and i am fine with it, because i am using windows ecosystem from day 1 i learned computer.

Niether i am a fan of windows or a hater of linux..Its choice of the users.

Personally i havent seen any Ubuntu installed in corporate offices, if its a linux PC only Redhat is used..not sure why they ONLY use Redhat.

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cork1958

I don't use it simply because I'm an underdog kind of person. Meaning I know how to make my own decisions and use something based on that instead of playing follow the leader and using it just because everybody else does. Same thing with Firefox, although with that, the fanboyism is totally nauseating. Especially since so many of those people are fooled into thinking it's the greatest browser in the world and so secure!!

As you see by my signature, I'm using the new Zenwalk 4.8 (Slackware).

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Mouldy Punk
I don't use it simply because I'm an underdog kind of person. Meaning I know how to make my own decisions and use something based on that...

Or, you try so hard not to follow the crowd that despite seeing something good that everyone uses, you choice to use something different just for the sake of being different, even if it isn't as good.

I'm not saying that's the case here with ubuntu and slackware. But have you ever thought, that maybe loads of people use ubuntu because it's actually better than the rest? Again, I'm not saying it necessarily is, for the sake of argument though, lets assume it is. Lets assume ubuntu is the best distro in the entire world. It does absolutely everything quickly and can do so on even the most basic hardware, so, everybody starts using it, because it's that good. Now, are you saying that you'd come along, and blindly go to a less good distro just to be different? If that is the case, then you have issues my friend. Not picking something because everyone else did is plain absurd. Making your own decision about something is fair enough, but having it in your head that everybody else is wrong isn't.

Just my 0.02.

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darkz
Just curious----what do you mean by that?

which part is not clear to you?

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Knife Party

i stopped using it after trying to find or figure out why my screen resolution on my laptop was stuck at 1024x768.

and i miss using the calibri font, would love to have that in ubuntu.

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James7

You could say that supporting the underdog is a way of supporting competition. Personally I am happy to use Ubuntu (easy for me as I am new) right now, though I remain open-minded (and am looking forward to Neowin's Shift Linux). To me the experience of using Ubuntu is miles better in almost every way I can imagine than my experiences using Windows (especially Vista). But I use Ubuntu because I think it is a better product, not to support the underdog.

But I can understand someone saying it's good to support the underdog. To me, Windows is an inferior product so it's widespread use is based on the monopoly Microsoft has achieved through bullying OEMs down the years and stifling competition. In this case I think it is good to support the underdog (if of course it is better, as Linux and Macs certainly are in my book) as it can only help make for a better world for us all the more people know that there are alternatives and that they have a choice. Once they know these things then there can be real competition with more OEMs selling machines with Linux installed by default just the way they do now with Windows.

The biggest threat to Microsoft's dominance is that the majority out there start seeing that they have a choice, IMO. Frankly I think Macs are superior to Windows PCs as well. I just wish they'd shed their 'boutique' image, just as I hope Linux can broaden out from its 'geek' image, as Ubuntu and some other distros are trying hard to do (doesn't mean it has to abandon or compromise anything along the way).

I don't want this to seem like a troll or anything because I just mean that the issue is real competition. This can only benefit everyone through stimulating real innovation. It'll make Windows, Linux, Macs and other systems better for everyone to use. :D

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