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Ubuntu on a network?


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Danny D

Hi,

I have 4 computers at home and one laptop. One of the computers has ubuntu. Is it possible to connect all my windows machines to the ubuntu so they can share files? Basically i want to be able to get files from the ubuntu pc.

thanks!

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boogerjones

Getting files off a Ubuntu shared folder from a Windows PC is easy. Just right click on a folder in Ubuntu, go to the "Share" tab, and enable it. You might be asked to install the Samba service; do so.

The hard part is getting the Ubuntu box to access shared folders on a Windows machine. No matter what permissions I set, I cannot get to shared files on my Windows 7 box.

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Danny D
Getting files off a Ubuntu shared folder from a Windows PC is easy. Just right click on a folder in Ubuntu, go to the "Share" tab, and enable it. You might be asked to install the Samba service; do so.

The hard part is getting the Ubuntu box to access shared folders on a Windows machine. No matter what permissions I set, I cannot get to shared files on my Windows 7 box.

I already installed samba. Ok let me try what you said and see if it works. I also tried to get files of my windows 7 and its impossible lol i tried everything.

edit:

Ok that works great. Also does ubuntu have a limit on how many users can connect to it?

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+John Teacake

No Its Open Source Software . . . Theres no limits ;) So is this for your home network or work Danny?

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Danny D

James I am just testing this at home and if everything works correctly then I will be doing the same thing at work.

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+John Teacake

Ubuntu is VERY well documented, In fact most Linux variants are. Although for someone in your experience I would be very careful about putting it in a production environment. You need to be very on the ball when somethings wrong or you want to make any changes to it otherwise you run the risk of loosing your data (In your case).

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Danny D

James, what kind of problems do you think I can run into?

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+John Teacake

Haha in your case, Lots :p Surrounding begginers and Linux, Quite a lot. Depends on how critical this system is. If not "mission critical" . . . Great! As you might be aware there is a steep learning curve between Windows and Linux ;)

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Danny D

Can you give me some example problems I can run into?

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markjensen

If you are a good admin and keep a backup of your data (this applies equally to Linux and Windows), no real problems. ;)

And, from setting up a simple file share, you don't need to do much learning. See? You have already done it. (Y)

Might I suggest you investigate alternatives, like using webmin to administer, instead of needing to access that box directly and login? You can go headless that way, and even ditch X.

And, hey, since you are able to ditch X, why use heavy Ubuntu? There are leaner distros for filesharing. In fact, several that are specifically built for what you are doing. But something tells me you have been told this before.

Use whatever suits you best. They will all work. (and not having connection limits, or needing CALs and such is rather nice)

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+John Teacake
Can you give me some example problems I can run into?

Not really, I don't know your environment. Give it ago and see for yourself . . .

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breed

For simple file sharing at home, samba (SMB/CIFS) is a good choice. However, since you said something about taking your Ubuntu machine into work, I would strongly recommend either using FTP or SSH. Two good reasons for doing this:

1. Both FTP and SSH are more typically more secure, of course this depends on your setup

2. While Samba works over TCP and guarantees delivery, it is more prone to network issues, and if you drop a connection midway through a file transfer, you start over. You can resume with FTP and SSH.

As far as FTP, you might want to look at vsftpd, which has a very simple and well documented conf file. SSH/SCP is also a great choice. Make sure you have a user in Ubuntu that has access to your files, and from your Windows machines, you can use WinSCP (http://www.winscp.net) for a GUI based file transfer.

Hope this helps,

breed

http://www.breednet.net

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markjensen

^^^ If you wish to keep posting links to your site/blog, you ought to put that in your sig, rather than in your posts. (Y)

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+BudMan

So Danny did you Test out ClarkConnect?? This is better geared for a new admin and soho server. Vs what I assume is most likely the desktop version of Ubuntu.

Don't get me wrong - its a fine distro, and any linux distro with samba can share files to windows computers. But something like CC is designed specifically for that function, and makes it REAL easy to setup a domain even, etc..

So did you even bother to Check out CC or not?

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Danny D

Budman,

I installed it on one of my test PC's and everything went smoothly, but then i was asked if i wanted to continue with a text based interface or a graphics interface. I could not go further than that point because none of the options worked what ever i clicked on, everything just stayed there.

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Danny D
For simple file sharing at home, samba (SMB/CIFS) is a good choice. However, since you said something about taking your Ubuntu machine into work, I would strongly recommend either using FTP or SSH. Two good reasons for doing this:

1. Both FTP and SSH are more typically more secure, of course this depends on your setup

2. While Samba works over TCP and guarantees delivery, it is more prone to network issues, and if you drop a connection midway through a file transfer, you start over. You can resume with FTP and SSH.

As far as FTP, you might want to look at vsftpd, which has a very simple and well documented conf file. SSH/SCP is also a great choice. Make sure you have a user in Ubuntu that has access to your files, and from your Windows machines, you can use WinSCP (http://www.winscp.net) for a GUI based file transfer.

Hope this helps,

breed

http://www.breednet.net

Hi,

I dont think i need any security. Who else can access the network other than us? How would they get in?

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+BudMan

You did not even bother to breeze over the install quick start guide did you.. You use a WEB GUI to manage the thing.. What your looking at on the machine is either text or gui based to setup the network, status on load, etc. nothing MORE.. So yeah theres not much to do there.

RTFM!!!! Or atleast the QUICK START GUIDE!!

http://www.clarkconnect.com/help/pdf/CC-Quickstart.pdf

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Miuku.

Relax Budman ;)

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MR_Candyman
Relax Budman ;)

naw, I quite agree with Bug, it's an ongoing saga

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+BudMan

Yeah ongoing is putting it lightly -- to be honest the guy should prob not be allowed to come within 10 feet of a computer at any business. But somehow he got hired as the IT guy at a small company. Been trying to help him -- but stories change, don't know if he is talking about his work network, or his home machine. And then not getting any feedback on the last advice before he has a new question.

Its getting to be a bit frustrating to be honest, atleast take a couple of minutes to breeze over the getting started guide on a new something your going to try before moving on to something else..

How about some FEEDBACK! To the people that are trying to help you!

I would be more than happy to hold his freaking hand setting up CC for example.. But nobody can help you if you don't ask!

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+John Teacake
Hi,

I dont think i need any security. Who else can access the network other than us? How would they get in?

Please please tell me your not been serious, I'm sorry but how you are managing that poor persons network is beyond me. Have you thought about firewalls? (as a very very small part of your network security), Weak passwords, Patching of software to name VERY small part of security considerations. I presume that the PC's on "your network" are connected to the internet. . . . You asked how they would get in. Thats your answer right there!!!! Your setting up an FTP server right??? Are you allowing access to the "outside" well just take a look at how many hacking attempts you will get after a week of it been up, You will be very supprised. Im getting annoyed about this for two reasons . . . your attitude to security and plus the fact its something Im extremely interested in and believe me its a hostile world out there on the internet, Infact not just on the internet.

I could rant on all day to you about this subject but then you would just turn round and say your paying Cisco $2million a year to look after your "security" or something and well good look to you!!!

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breed
Hi,

I dont think i need any security. Who else can access the network other than us? How would they get in?

Are you serious? You know what, why don't you turn on Samba, connect directly to the internet and make sure TCP/UDP 135-137 are open on your firewall (if you have a firewall). Information should be free, right?!

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+John Teacake

This guy didnt know what a switch was do you really think hes going to be able to tell the difference (physically) between that and a firewall.

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majortom1981

Come on You guys dont have to bash him. I just posted how this site was better then most when regarding linux help and then you guys have to bash this guy. Just answer his questions . No need to bash him.

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Danny D
Come on You guys dont have to bash him. I just posted how this site was better then most when regarding linux help and then you guys have to bash this guy. Just answer his questions . No need to bash him.

You cant do anything about it mate. Thats just how it is. If i knew everything I would not be here. No more questions from me. Thanks guys

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+John Teacake

Hey Danny, Dont stop asking questions here. I read your other posts and some of them are ok. But please dont come to a tech site and say "Oh you dont need security" Especially in this day and age and expect not to get laughed out of the room (Forum). If you think about it this way, What if you said to your boss "You dont need any security" What do u recon s/he would say to that? . . .

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