Microsoft "Lumia smartphones powered by Snapdragon 810 processors" are on the way

Microsoft has no shortage of devices at the lower end of its range, and the recent launch of its new Lumia 435 and 532 - two of its most affordable handsets ever - has expanded its low-cost options even further. But the patience of those awaiting a new Windows Phone range-topper may soon be rewarded.

In a press release relating to its new Snapdragon 810 SoC, Qualcomm today referred to new flagship-class handsets on the way from Microsoft. It quotes Microsoft general manager Juha Kokkonen, who referred to the "long-standing collaboration" between the two companies on the dozens of Lumia models that have gone on sale so far.

Kokkonen said: "We look forward to continuing this relationship to deliver best in class Lumia smartphones, powered by Qualcomm's Snapdragon 810 processors, and offer an unprecedented combination of processing power, rich multimedia, high-performance graphics and wireless connectivity for our customers."

This suggests that Microsoft plans to launch multiple devices running the Snapdragon 810, but exactly which handsets will get the mighty new SoC remains unclear. The 6-inch Lumia 1520 is ready for replacement, as is the smaller Lumia 930, the near-identical twin of the Icon, which went on sale a year ago. A new version of the Lumia 1020 - which featured a 41-megapixel PureView camera - could also potentially feature the high-end 810 SoC.

The launch of the Snapdragon 810 has been marred by widespread reports of overheating problems with the new processor. OnePlus is said to have pushed back its next handset as a result of the issues, while Sony, LG and Samsung have reportedly experienced similar problems. A recent report claimed that Samsung has actually dropped the 810 from its upcoming Galaxy S6 flagship.

Source: Qualcomm via Windows Central

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