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HawkMan

I couldn't care less how "doubtful" you are hawkman, but one thing is certain, when a zealot deliberately attacks someone over their views is becomes clear that the zealot is on shaky ground and the zealot knows it.

The only zealot I see is you. You visit EVERY windows 8 thread to post the same thing, as if it hurt your grandmother or something. And I didn't attack your views, I attacked the fact that what you represent as your views has for the most no factual connection to windows 8. Basically you post a lot of lies and misconceptions about Windows 8, I wa giving you the benefit of the doubt and assuming it was out of ignorance and not willfull lying, deceiving and trolling, as the energy you put into it makes no logical sense.

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Order_66

Zealotry aside, If MS allows boot to desktop, with the start icon launching the Start Page, I believe the majority of people will accept this, especially if Search is streamlined and unified.

Would you accept that Order? Not love it, but accept it?

Personally I believe having a start button that takes you to metro is a complete and utter waste of time not to mention an outright insult to desktop users everywhere.

Most consumers hate metro, placing a start button that takes you to metro will only further the windows 8 failboat into oblivion.

The only zealot I see is you.

Then you obviously have no idea what the word "zealot" means at all.

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+warwagon

That sounds more like XP.

I'd say Windows 8 is like a real car, but with a bunch of extra buttons and features sitting on top of features you already had.

Windows 8 is like a real car, except it hides the blinker, windshield wipers, radio. To find them you have to put your hand in the corner.

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Growled

Windows 8 is like a real car, but with Fisherprice instruments and paint!

If I were to compare Windows 8 to a car, I'd say it's like an American going to the UK and finding that everyone drives on the wrong side of the road, with the steering wheel on the wrong side of the car. Everything we know is still there but it's all a bit different.

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bigmehdi

Windows 8 is great, because you have one good reason to avoid the hassle of upgrade.

Somehow, I love win 8.

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HawkMan

Most consumers hate metro, placing a start button that takes you to metro will only further the windows 8 failboat into oblivion.

Then you obviously have no idea what the word "zealot" means at all.

You obviously have Nordea what consumers like hate or don't care about. Just like you don't ow what's a zealot is.

Windows 8 is like a real car, except it hides the blinker, windshield wipers, radio. To find them you have to put your hand in the corner.

And windows 7 is like a car where you have all those button over the windshield and when you drive they go away to show the road ? Since you must for some strange reason be comparing to the desktop and not the start menu here which also requires clicking it to get them out, and then you have to search in tiered folders for the right button...

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adrynalyne

You obviously have Nordea what consumers like hate or don't care about. Just like you don't ow what's a zealot is.

And windows 7 is like a car where you have all those button over the windshield and when you drive they go away to show the road ? Since you must for some strange reason be comparing to the desktop and not the start menu here which also requires clicking it to get them out, and then you have to search in tiered folders for the right button...

Wow, I've seen people botch analogies before, but never before have I wanted to tear out my eyes after seeing a failed attempt, until now.

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HawkMan

Wow, I've seen people botch analogies before, but never before have I wanted to tear out my eyes after seeing a failed attempt, until now.

That's because the whole car analogy was idiotic form the start and in no way applied or could be applied to windows or any version thereof.

It pretty much had to be botched to make any sense, and maybe you should have looked at Warwagon first when saying that, huh ?

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adrynalyne

So breaking away from analogies which has been thoroughly murdered, revived, and then shot to death again in the last couple of posts, who is right here?

Is it the few people here and there that think Windows 8 is fine?

Or the resoundingly large group that says it is not?

Windows 8 isn't meant to be a niche product, so something is wrong there.

Does anyone really believe that the meager marketshare that Windows 8 now holds is not in direct relation to PC purchases?

Last question. If Windows 7 OR Windows 8 was offered at the same time on a new PC, would Windows 8 still have the marketshare it has now?

It used to be that when a new MS OS came out, a small crowd people would be over at the display models at Best Buy and checking it out. I've not seen that with Windows 8. Maybe it is a coincidence with the down market with PC sales (not blaming Windows 8 there). Or maybe it is something else, like consumers not finding value in Windows 8.

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HawkMan

But the majority doesn't have a problem with Windows 8. even on these forums there's a very vocal minority who goes into EVERY windows 8 thread spewing bile and hatred.

Among regular users they don't hate windows 8, they either have no opinion, or they actually like it. what they don't like is the economy and spending money on new hardware right now. when I have clients who have a choice between windows 7 and windows 8 and they get to test windows 8, they want windows 8. But most just want windows 8 anyway.

So yes, the meager marketshare windows 8 has no is definitely due to PC sales. BUT low PC sales is NOT because of Windows 8.

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adrynalyne

I can only speak of what I see, but so far outside of geeky tech forums, I've not found a single person in the real world who has had something nice to say about Windows 8.

By the way, I never said low PC sales were due to Windows 8. My point was that Windows 8 meager marketshare is only because of PC sales. As in, without PC sales, it wouldn't have as much as it does now (which isn't much).

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HawkMan

Well PC sales is the only way people upgrade their windows. as a general rule. People NEVER upgrade their windows, you're lucky if they update the damn things.

The problem with those "people" in the real world, is that they have never seen or tried Windows 8. they've heard that it sucks from random news sites or form a techie friend. Let them try Windows 8 and they like it or love it. I have yet to demo it to a single person who dislike or hates it afterwards.

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adrynalyne

Well PC sales is the only way people upgrade their windows. as a general rule. People NEVER upgrade their windows, you're lucky if they update the damn things.

The problem with those "people" in the real world, is that they have never seen or tried Windows 8. they've heard that it sucks from random news sites or form a techie friend. Let them try Windows 8 and they like it or love it. I have yet to demo it to a single person who dislike or hates it afterwards.

You must demo to a geekier crowd than I. I have the exact opposite reaction from people. The most common question is, "Why do I need that?"

Not good words to hear when a company is trying to get people to purchase their new product.

Even with slow PC sales, Windows 8 should have more marketshare unless something is wrong (whether it is perception or reality).

Windows 7 had almost as much marketshare, in the first month of release.

http://mashable.com/...-7-usage-stats/

Are you going to tell me that even in this down market, that its normal that Windows 8 took almost 5 months (moving through a holiday season) to accomplish the same? It would take more than a 14% decline in PC sales to account for that, IMO. Remember, 2012 only had a ~5% drop in PC sales. October-December....yeah, does not compute.

Even if it is all about public perception, that still has a very real effect on adoption and it is Microsoft's fault for not clearly defining how Windows 8 fits in. Heck, I have days where I still wonder, despite me using it 5 days a week.

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HawkMan

Hell no, my crowd is about as ungeeky as it get, from tween girls, to farmers who don't want use or think they need a computer but have to have it anyway, to 70+ year old people who need it and in some cases want it cause they think it's fun.

probably have something to do with how you present it. presenting it as " this is your new start menu, it has nice big icons that are easily organized" and they're either"whatever, as long as I can start internet" or "well that's really nice".

no the reason Windows 7 grew so fast was several factors, huge growth in PC sales market, and people buying new computers after the super slow low end Vista laptop fiasco.

problem is, that for the last several years even low end computers are so fast, people don't need to buy new computers anymore, the ones they have are fast enough.

So no, even with slow PC sales, Windows 8 won't grow faster. PC sales IS windows 8 sales. upgrade licenses are virtually not sold, the only ones who buy them are geeks. and we are less than one percent of the market.

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+Anarkii

I've said it since day 1: Microsoft needs 2 versions of Windows. One for desktop computers with a keyboard and mouse

and one for touch enabled devices.

I even tweeted @windows about it and they said...

Windows Support ?@WindowsSupport15 Apr

@anarkii Thanks for the suggestion. We'll pass it along. Do you have a specific question or issue we can help with? ^DW

Now comes news that the start button will return in 8.1 - and a boot to desktop option. Makes me happy that NOW they actually listen to people where building Windows 8 they totally ignored the consumer.

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HawkMan

What part of windows 8 doesn't work just as good with a keyboard and mouse as windows 7....

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MorganX

That's because the whole car analogy was idiotic form the start and in no way applied or could be applied to windows or any version thereof.

It pretty much had to be botched to make any sense, and maybe you should have looked at Warwagon first when saying that, huh ?

ROFLMAO. Hawkman you're making much more civil arguments lately, I'm actually reading and getting a lot from your posts lately. But, sometimes you just lose one.

And that was a terrible analogy you made, but I have to give you points for trying to pull off a miraculous save without taking so much as a one inch step backwards. :)

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Eric

[Thread closed]

Apparently discussion of the news article has ended.

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