Recommended Posts

Dot Matrix

Maybe the hybrid UI implementation will be over, but Windows/Microsoft, nah. I think we're kidding ourselves if at this stage we are to believe within 30 days MS couldn't release Windows 8 Sans Modern UI. I absolutely do not believe they are not maintaining concurrent builds until they know this plan will succeed.

If Windows Blue experiences a "failure to launch" I think you will see major backtracking even to the point of restoring the Start Menu, but it would take another 14% sales decline after blue, combined with lackluster (last place) Phone and Tablet sales. There is a fail safe, I can guarantee that. They'll never admit it now, that would be a disaster.

They will enable the Start Menu and Boot to Desktop faster than you can boot Windows 8 off a SSD Raid if things continue as is after Blue.

You're living in a world of delusion. Microsoft isn't going to backtrack anything. You don't do that in the world of tech. Windows 8 has too many important changes, to just simply remove. If they didn't backtrack with 8.1, they certainly won't with 9, either.

Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

You're living in a world of delusion. Microsoft isn't going to backtrack anything. You don't do that in the world of tech. Windows 8 has too many important changes, to just simply remove. If they didn't backtrack with 8.1, they certainly won't with 9, either.

While I use Windows 8 and am fine with it...thats a load right there.

You DO backtrack in tech if you make a mistake. You don't continue making them.

And don't tell me there weren't mistakes with Windows 8. I am fine with it, you are fine with it, the majority is not.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowMajestic

Lol. Hardly. SJVN is a world class idiot. His articles are nothing but flamibait, and have been for years. This man decries everything Microsoft. They could cure cancer, and SJVN would still **** and moan.

Better yet, Microsoft is involved with cancer research.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
MorganX

You're living in a world of delusion. Microsoft isn't going to backtrack anything. You don't do that in the world of tech. Windows 8 has too many important changes, to just simply remove. If they didn't backtrack with 8.1, they certainly won't with 9, either.

What's delusional is not realizing that backtracking on users don't need more than 2 apps at the same time, by adding more snap views in Blue, is backtracking due to user demand. The Search fixes leaked are backtracking on MS notion that 90% of the time users searched for apps and unified search wasn't wanted.

Stop being ridiculous d-matrix.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
bigmehdi

You're living in a world of delusion. Microsoft isn't going to backtrack anything. You don't do that in the world of tech. Windows 8 has too many important changes, to just simply remove. If they didn't backtrack with 8.1, they certainly won't with 9, either.

They don't have to backtrack anything, they just have to give user choices, such like the ability to boot to desktop,

or to ignore the metro side if they aren't interested.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Raa

Like BIll Gates coming back to Microsoft! If someone could get a company up and thriving, it would be him!

He's not coming back, sorry. :(

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

They don't have to backtrack anything, they just have to give user choices, such like the ability to boot to desktop,

or to ignore the metro side if they aren't interested.

I think he considers that backtracking...

Link to post
Share on other sites
MorganX

I think he considers that backtracking...

Since they made the decision not to provide those things, it would be backtracking.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix

What's delusional is not realizing that backtracking on users don't need more than 2 apps at the same time, by adding more snap views in Blue, is backtracking due to user demand. The Search fixes leaked are backtracking on MS notion that 90% of the time users searched for apps and unified search wasn't wanted.

Stop being ridiculous d-matrix.

That's not backtracking. That's carrying on. As Metro evolves, it'll gain new features. Chances are these features were already planned, but not implemented due to time constraints. Microsoft backtracking to a Windows 7 state is never going to happen, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

I'm convinced that Windows 8 is not the complete problem Sure a lot of people don't like it, but they would adjust in time. The main problem boils down to price. Most people already have phones that do much of what they want to do and a lot already have a computer with some form of Windows on it. They don't see the need to upgrade or get another computer with Windows, especially when a tablet at a much more reasonable price will do them just fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Atomic Wanderer Chicken

He's not coming back, sorry. :(

Bill Gates is a super genius and 1000x better of a CEO than Ballmer obviously! He needs to come back, and demote Ballmer! He is the founder of Microsoft, and Gates could come back anytime he wants!

Link to post
Share on other sites
contextfree

I more or less agree with all that. Except the closing of apps. Technically pointless yes, but much more efficient. For many users, myself included, it is quicker to close or minimize and app to get to what's behind it than to go to an app bar or finger switch to next app. Say calculator, do a calc, copy result, just close. Spreadsheet behind. As long at W32 reigns supreme, this UX will butt heads with the optimal way to use the Modern UI. It's a transitional thing that may not go away.

They're pretty much exactly the same in terms of effort. Closing a (maximized) (desktop) app to switch to previous app behind it = click in top-right corner, switch to previous Windows Store app = click in top left corner.

I think you identified the real problem though, people (especially the sort of devoted PC users who tend to post on message boards :) ) have ingrained habits of PC usage that are hard to break. Most people using iOS or Android devices don't even think to worry or wonder about closing apps, which I don't think is because of anything inherent to touch or tablet form factors (other than that using something physically different can suspend existing habits), but just because people come to those devices fresh with no preconceived expectations. However, I think it's those habits and expectations that cause people to think of a PC as something more cumbersome or stressful to use than newer devices - you have to worry about "managing" a PC in a way you don't with an iPad. And so as long as those expectations continue, PCs will continue to lose ground to devices perceived as more hassle-free.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

Bill Gates is a super genius and 1000x better of a CEO than Ballmer obviously! He needs to come back, and demote Ballmer! He is the founder of Microsoft, and Gates could come back anytime he wants!

I don't think even he could save the PC market. People are moving on, slowly but surely toward mobility.

Link to post
Share on other sites
MorganX

That's not backtracking. That's carrying on.

Nevermind. I am no match for the d-Matrix reality distortion field. Steve Jobs would be quite proud of you my friend. :p

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
MorganX

They're pretty much exactly the same in terms of effort. Closing a (maximized) (desktop) app to switch to previous app behind it = click in top-right corner, switch to previous Windows Store app = click in top left corner.

I think you identified the real problem though, people (especially the sort of devoted PC users who tend to post on message boards :) ) have ingrained habits of PC usage that are hard to break.

I agree with second paragraph. First paragraph, no, not for me. Maximized window, requires less precision and targeting. App switch requires more precision, plus a wait, then a target on appropriate thumbnail, even assuming it's the only one or you lose the bar. Same thing if you minimize as opposed to close. I've been using for 6 months now, a lot, and App switch bar will never become a reflex action. It's really nice on a tablet though, seriously, well designed. It's perfect for that.

It's not a big issue for me, I do understand it though. And for me, closing and reopening and app is basically instant. If you use keyboard shortcuts for app switching and/or closing it's the same effort. Nothing in Modern UI can compare to the Explorer UI/MDI. I don't think it's supposed to. I think MS used faulty data to determine most desktop users don't use more than two apps at a time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Crimson Rain

Lol. Hardly. SJVN is a world class idiot. His articles are nothing but flamibait, and have been for years. This man decries everything Microsoft. They could cure cancer, and SJVN would still **** and moan.

If MS release a medicine that cures cancer, and aids and distribute them for free, this dude will publish articles saying MS is making other cancer researches lose money, helping world's population to grow even more and promoting protection free se etc.

This dude would probably nuke whole Redmond just to get rid of Microsoft...then again, if MS is not there, who will he write his **** articles about?

His articles attract a lot of people (just read the comments). I have to give him this at least.

Sometimes I feel like ZDNet has instructed him to write in this way cause of pagehits...

Link to post
Share on other sites
MorganX

I don't think even he could save the PC market. People are moving on, slowly but surely toward mobility.

The base isn't diminishing, just new sales. That's important for MS. Millions upgrade and buy new apps for features, capabilities, etc. Many build their own PCs. Microcenter is actually flourishing here.

Windows 7 generated new apps that ran better or were more capable for Windows 7. Designed for Windows 7 did well. There's no such thing for Windows 8. It's taking way too long. Not a single AAA game for Windows 8 Modern UI has been announced, nor serious application. So if all the apps and games run under Win 32, there is absolutely no need to upgrade to Windows 8 or purchase a new PC for new capabilities with Windows 8.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
webeagle12

The only failure in this article is ZDNet

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

Lol. Hardly. SJVN is a world class idiot. His articles are nothing but flamibait, and have been for years. This man decries everything Microsoft. They could cure cancer, and SJVN would still **** and moan.

He really writes some good Linux articles. I enjoy those. I still haven't decided if he is 100% serious when he writes articles against Windows.

The base isn't diminishing, just new sales. That's important for MS. Millions upgrade and buy new apps for features, capabilities, etc. Many build their own PCs. Microcenter is actually flourishing here.

I believe the new sales are going to mobile devices and when it's time it's time to upgrade those devices the users will probably do so. I have a PC and I am counted in their base but I haven't turned the thing on in ages. A lot of people are like me. It's just a matter of time before the base diminishes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
xWhiplash

Say what you want about all of these articles, but the damage is being done. General user Joe Smith user does not care if ZDNet is horrible or not. They see all of these articles and make up their mind that Windows 8 sucks without trying it. This is Windows Vista all over again. Why didn't Microsoft learn from this?

I had to help somebody with their Windows 8 computer, I was in Desktop so I pressed the Windows key and started typing. He said "How the hell did you bring up search?!".

Windows 8 is a giant mess. Invisible menus and hidden features are not good. He had no idea you can just type to search.

Also, for the last time, companies are not immune to failures. All you people saying Microsoft will not backtrack. Why? It would be business suicide IF....IF (note....IF) EVERYBODY that uses it requests that they change it.

IF......IF (note....IF) Microsoft releases Windows 9+ and they decide to go the chrome book way and only have Internet Explorer and other internet only solutions, you are saying there is NO POSSIBLE WAY Microsoft would revert back?

Microsoft WILL BACKTRACK IF....IF (note the IF) enough of the consumers / businesses need them to.

If everybody thought like that, that would be a disaster. If we just accept whatever a company does and not voice our opinions, nothing will change.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix

Windows 7 generated new apps that ran better or were more capable for Windows 7. Designed for Windows 7 did well. There's no such thing for Windows 8.

Huh? There's an ENTIRE store dedicated to Windows 8 apps! Also where are the Windows 7 apps? Where was all the promises Microsoft made with Windows 7 apps, and Adobe AIR, etc? Neowin's list is lackluster at best.

It's taking way too long. Not a single AAA game for Windows 8 Modern UI has been announced, nor serious application. So if all the apps and games run under Win 32, there is absolutely no need to upgrade to Windows 8 or purchase a new PC for new capabilities with Windows 8.

False.

Twitter, Skype, OneNote, EverNote, Kindle, SkyDrive, DropBox, Lync, Nokia Music, VLC, CNN, NBC News, NY TImes, ABC News, Fresh Paint, Wikipedia, Netflix, Hulu, Firefox, and Chrome. Office is coming soon as well. You're also never going to see a AAA title outside of Steam or Origin, they have the market locked down.

Link to post
Share on other sites
xWhiplash

Huh? There's an ENTIRE store dedicated to Windows 8 apps! Also where are the Windows 7 apps? Where was all the promises Microsoft made with Windows 7 apps, and Adobe AIR, etc? Neowin's list is lackluster at best.

False.

Twitter, Skype, OneNote, EverNote, Kindle, SkyDrive, DropBox, Lync, Nokia Music, VLC, CNN, NBC News, NY TImes, ABC News, Fresh Paint, Firefox, and Chrome. Office is coming soon as well. You're also never going to see a AAA title outside of Steam or Origin, they have the market locked down.

Why do you keep bringing up Windows 7 apps? There are a lot more Windows programs than apps. What are you looking for that does not exist? There is Microsoft Office, FL Studio, Sony Acid, Steam, Impulse, Origin and thousands of games from indie to AAA, Adobe Suite now on CS6, Visual Studio, 3DS Max, Blender, SQL Management Studio, Screen Recording, music programs, ...

I could go on for hours with that list. What are you looking for that exists in Windows 8 that does not exist in Windows 7? What is the absolutely MUST NEEDED app that is not available in some form for Windows 7? Angry Birds?

Also, MorganX meant SERIOUS APPLICATION. Meaning where is the full Photoshop (not photoshop elements-like, the FULL Photoshop) app? Where is the 3DS Max app? Those are SERIOUS apps. What you listed are not serious productive apps.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

Huh? There's an ENTIRE store dedicated to Windows 8 apps! Also where are the Windows 7 apps? Where was all the promises Microsoft made with Windows 7 apps, and Adobe AIR, etc? Neowin's list is lackluster at best.

False.

Twitter, Skype, OneNote, EverNote, Kindle, SkyDrive, DropBox, Lync, Nokia Music, VLC, CNN, NBC News, NY TImes, ABC News, Fresh Paint, Wikipedia, Netflix, Hulu, Firefox, and Chrome. Office is coming soon as well. You're also never going to see a AAA title outside of Steam or Origin, they have the market locked down.

Just about all of those have better featured desktop counterparts.

Most Windows 8 apps are hollow shells that have less features than desktop applications.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix

Just about all of those have better featured desktop counterparts.

Most Windows 8 apps are hollow shells that have less features than desktop applications.

Half of those don't even have desktop counterparts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By indospot
      Samsung's rugged Galaxy Tab Active3 is now available in the U.S.
      by João Carrasqueira

      Samsung first introduced the Galaxy Tab Active3 last September, as the latest member of its lineage of rugged tablets for the enterprise. Today, the company has announced that the tablet is now available to buy in the United States, and it's the first one to come with an Enterprise Edition that offers one year of Knox Suite and up to five years of security updates.

      Samsung also promises up to three generations of Android upgrades, which will be welcome considering it still ships with Android 10. Samsung plans to deliver an update to Android 11 that will also add the device to Google's list of Android Enterprise Recommended devices. The tablet also supports Samsung DeX for users that may want to connect it to a larger screen and have a desktop-like experience.

      In terms of the hardware, it's the same device we already know of. It's meant to be durable, with a MIL-STD-810H certification and IP68 water and dust resistance rating. The included S Pen is equally durable with the same IP rating, and the tablet itself has a display with enhanced sensitivity that lets you use the screen with gloves. Another feature that businesses might appreciate is the user-replaceable 5050mAh battery, and support for a no-battery mode, for situations where the tablet might be permanently attached to a power source.

      As for the specs, the tablet is powered by an Exynos 9810 octa-core chipset, 4GB of RAM, and up to 128GB of storage. The display is an 8-inch panel with Full HD+ resolution (1920x1200), and the rear camera is 13MP, while on the front there's a 5MP shooter.

      The Galaxy Tab Active3 comes in Wi-Fi-only and LTE models, starting at $489.99 for the former, and $589.99 for the latter. It's available to buy today.

    • By zikalify
      Samsung joins the Android Enterprise Recommended programme
      by Paul Hill



      Samsung has announced that it’s joining the Android Enterprise Recommended programme which is run by Google and aims to make it easier for businesses to integrate mobile solutions in their operations. By joining, customers can be assured Samsung’s devices are enterprise-ready.

      According to the firm, all of its Galaxy devices including smartphones and tablets running Android 11+ will be included in the programme. Some devices it listed as being covered include the S20, Note20, Tab S7|S7+, and rugged devices like the XCover Pro.

      Commenting on the development, KC Choi, EVP and Head of Global Mobile B2B Team, Mobile Communications Business, Samsung Electronics, said:

      According to Google, Samsung is just the latest manufacturer to join the Android Enterprise Recommended programme. Most recently, Lenovo, OnePlus, Oppo, and Xiaomi joined the programme bringing the total number of partners to over 30 worldwide.

    • By Abhay V
      New iPad Air passes through FCC, pre-orders rumored to open tomorrow
      by Abhay Venkatesh

      Back during its first virtual event for the fall, Apple unveiled the updated iPad Air –the fourth generation of the tablet – bringing an updated design with smaller bezels and flat edges. The tablet boasts of many improvements such as the new A14 Bionic processor, an upgrade over the A12 Bionic offered in its predecessor. It also offers a power button-based Touch ID, a first for the Cupertino giant’s devices.

      While the company did not mention a specific launch date for the device and only noted a vague “October” time frame, the device has now passed through FCC for certification. Spotted by 9to5Mac, the listing suggests that the device is now approved for sale in the U.S.

      Rumors suggest that the new iPad Air will go up for pre-order tomorrow, October 16, with availability slated for October 23. Best Buy Canada has already posted a listing for the tablet, suggesting that the pre-orders are closer than ever in that country. It will be interesting to see if these rumors are accurate and if the device indeed hits the web for pre-orders as suggested by the reports.

      The iPad Air starts at $599 and offers a design similar to the iPad Pro and also adds support for the second-generation Apple Pencil, bringing premium features to a more affordable price point. The eighth-gen iPad retails for $329 and is already on sale.

    • By indospot
      Samsung introduces the Galaxy Tab Active3, a rugged tablet for businesses
      by João Carrasqueira

      Samsung has announced the new Galaxy Tab Active3, a rugged tablet aimed at business users. This is the direct follow-up to the three-year-old Galaxy Tab Active2, though Samsung also introduced the 10-inch Galaxy Tab Active Pro last year.

      Being that it's been three years since its predecessor launched, the Galaxy Tab Active3 features some pretty significant improvements from its predecessor. The 8-inch display now comes in a 1920x1200 resolution, though it's still a TFT LCD panel. On the inside, there's an octa-core Exynos 9810 chipset with speeds up to 2.7GHz, plus 4GB of RAM and up to 128GB of internal storage, which can be expanded through a microSD card.



      The rear camera has also been bumped from an 8MP unit to a 13MP one, and Samsung has added support for Google's AR Core technology, so augmented reality applications should be compatible out of the box. The USB Type-C port has also been upgraded to USB 3.1 Gen 1, rather than USB 2.0. Additionally, the battery capacity has been bumped up to 5,050mAh, and it's still user replaceable.

      In line with the Galaxy Tab Active family, the new tablet has an IP68 rating for water and dust resistance, and so is the included S Pen. It also has the newer MIL-STD-810H certification for drurability.



      Software-wise, the Galaxy Tab Active3 ships with Android 10 out of the box, and Samsung promises three generations of Android updates, as well as regular monthly updates. The new tablet also supports Samsung DeX so you can connect to an external display and use it with a PC-like interface.

      The Samsung Galaxy Tab Active3 Pro is available starting today in markets including Europe and Asia, though the company hasn't shared pricing information. The tablet also doesn't appear to have been added to Samsung's rugged range page as of yet.

    • By indospot
      Google Play Console listing confirms Galaxy Tab S7 and S7+ specs
      by João Carrasqueira

      Image credit: WinFuture Samsung is set to hold an Unpacked event next week on August 5, where it will reveal its new Galaxy Note20, Galaxy Z Fold2, Galaxy Watch, Galaxy Buds Live, and the Galaxy Tab S7 duo. As we near the event, more information about the devices has been popping up on the internet, and now, Google itself confirmed some of the specs of the Galaxy Tab S7 and S7+ through the Google Play Console, as spotted by Pricebaba.

      Some of the information we already knew, including the fact that both models will be powered by Qualcomm's Snapdragon 865+ chipset. It also confirms both cellular and Wi-Fi only models for each of the variants, and it reveals that the Tab S7+ will have more RAM, with 8GB, while the Galaxy Tab S7 will stick with 6GB.

      As previously reported, the 12.4-inch Galaxy Tab S7+ will have a 2800x1752 resolution, while the smaller 11-inch model will have a lower 2560x1600 display. The listing points to a pixel density of 340DPI, but doing the math, it's actually around 266DPI for the Tab S7+ and 274DPI for the regular Tab S7.

      That leaves some unconfirmed information, but a recent leak from WinFuture shone light on just about every detail of the tablets. For one thing, there are plenty of images of the devices, revealing a new design with flat edges similar to the newer iPad Pro models. It also reveals three colors for the smaller model, but only black for the larger Galaxy Tab S7+. Another leak, from famed leaker Evan Blass on Twitter, revealed the tablet alongside a keyboard attachment.

      The smaller model will use an LCD panel, with AMOLED being reserved for the 12.4-inch variant, but both will reportedly sport a 120Hz refresh rate. Both will also come with an S Pen, with an area on the back of the tablet to house it while it isn't being used. Above the pen area, the camera setup will feature a 13MP main camera and a 5MP ultra-wide lens. The front-facing camera has an 8MP resolution.

      Image credit: WinFuture The leak also suggests a 10,090mAh battery for the larger Tab S7+ model, with the regular Tab S7 making do with a 7,040mAh unit. Storage will be 128GB in the Wi-Fi-only models, and up to 256GB on the cellular model, according to the leak, but they will also support expandable storage.

      There's only one week to go until Samsung makes the devices official, at which point we'll know the specs for sure, as well as price and availability details.