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+John.

 

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DocM

Minor roof fire put out with little damage which is already being repaired. Nothing in the building was damaged. 

 

An investigation is underway, but nearby there was a planned brush burn for wild fire control so a wind-born spark is high on the list.

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DocM

Starting Thread 9, so post there....

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Jim K

 

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