Windows 10 Technical Preview for phones


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W10 (phone) will be great.

what are you expexting to see during WP10mobile support cycle??

 

 

Universal Apps.
Interactive live tiles: something that hasn't been talk about recently because it came out early last year & it was supposed to be WP8.2.
MS just released a Java toolkit for W10
 

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I honestly don't think we need a separate thread for phones, since everything is just "Windows 10", that would be until the consumer preview is out.

 

 

W10 (phone) will be great.

That is yet to be seen ;)

 

 

Lumia software recovery tool updated to support windows 10 tech preview

We have a thread for apps:

https://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1244146-windows-preview-apps-for-windows-10/page-3#entry596740896

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I honestly don't think we need a separate thread for phones, since everything is just "Windows 10", that would be until the consumer preview is out.

 

 

That is yet to be seen ;)

 

 

We have a thread for apps:

https://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1244146-windows-preview-apps-for-windows-10/page-3#entry596740896

 

 

Ah thanks for apps thread.

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Lumia software recovery tool updated to support windows 10 tech preview

Since I haven't use it so far: does restoring carrier software to country variant (I'm not sure if that how they call the clean OS) removes branding? And is there a way to make backup image of OS befor any procedure?

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Since I haven't use it so far: does restoring carrier software to country variant (I'm not sure if that how they call the clean OS) removes branding? And is there a way to make backup image of OS befor any procedure?

 

On off contract phones it restores to Last stable image of windowsmobile OS by microsoft with Firmwares(country variant).

Not sure about Carrier Software

Now it will be able to roll back WM10 preview too with the new UPDATE.

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Since I haven't use it so far: does restoring carrier software to country variant (I'm not sure if that how they call the clean OS) removes branding? And is there a way to make backup image of OS befor any procedure?

It downloads latest official release for your phone including any carrier branding+bloat. You don't really need to backup the OS.
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Since I haven't use it so far: does restoring carrier software to country variant (I'm not sure if that how they call the clean OS) removes branding? And is there a way to make backup image of OS befor any procedure?

 

 

It downloads latest official release for your phone including any carrier branding+bloat. You don't really need to backup the OS.

 

 

Thanks for the info.

But Just a point the original WPmobile OS it dowloads is approx 1.5gb (varies with version)

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Lumia software recovery tool updated to support windows 10 tech preview

 

Kind of related, kind of unrelated at the same time - when Windows Phone 10 (or what ever they're going to name it because I've seen 'Windows Mobile 10' thrown around as well) will there be the ability to do a recovery using that tool and it downloads the Windows Phone 10 image for the phone?

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Kind of related, kind of unrelated at the same time - when Windows Phone 10 (or what ever they're going to name it because I've seen 'Windows Mobile 10' thrown around as well) will there be the ability to do a recovery using that tool and it downloads the Windows Phone 10 image for the phone?

 

It will be able to dowload stable build IMO.

And windows phone 10 needs to be installed over it with INSIDER APP.

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It will be able to dowload stable build IMO.

And windows phone 10 needs to be installed over it with INSIDER APP.

 

Cool - I'm holding off from considering a Windows Phone until Microsoft releases a flag ship update preferably with an sdcard slot in it.

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Cool - I'm holding off from considering a Windows Phone until Microsoft releases a flag ship update preferably with an sdcard slot in it.

 

well they said they will launch a Flagship device with w10mobile (when RTM).

SDcard might be there.

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Kind of related, kind of unrelated at the same time - when Windows Phone 10 (or what ever they're going to name it because I've seen 'Windows Mobile 10' thrown around as well) will there be the ability to do a recovery using that tool and it downloads the Windows Phone 10 image for the phone?

 

not windows mobile 10, but Windows 10 Mobile. as in Windows 10 for mobile devices, phones and tablets.

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well they said they will launch a Flagship device with w10mobile (when RTM).

SDcard might be there.

 

Hopefully - something like a 940 or a 1030 would be great but they really do need to get their music app sorted given that it is one of the main things I use my phone for next to web browsing (outside of phoning and text messaging).

 

not windows mobile 10, but Windows 10 Mobile. as in Windows 10 for mobile devices, phones and tablets.

 

Cool, so the Windows 10 has become the dominant part, and the 'Mobile' is considered an 'edition' rather than it being part of the brand itself.

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Hopefully - something like a 940 or a 1030 would be great but they really do need to get their music app sorted given that it is one of the main things I use my phone for next to web browsing (outside of phoning and text messaging).

 

 

Cool, so the Windows 10 has become the dominant part, and the 'Mobile' is considered an 'edition' rather than it being part of the brand itself.

 

 

Yes they will launch a flagship.

Nokia Windowsphones have great audio quality but app need a bit of love.

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The wait for Windows 10 for Phones is driving me crazy... I mean, I know the Seattle Seahawks lost the Super Bowl, but I didn't think they'd take that out on US :p

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*take it with a grain of salt*

 

Anonymous Tip: Windows 10 Build 8.15.12495.44, planned release 9th Feb, 9 am PST

 

Disclaimer: This is an anonymous tip!! NPU doesn

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      Sound design
      The sound of thousands of hooves hitting the ground makes everything rumble even before the cavalry charge come into view. You can hear the fear in a villager’s voice as they defend against a wolf attack alone. Echoing whistles of Scouts as they spot rival camps. Ambient noise near busy cities. The roar of armies as they encounter enemy troops and laugh with obvious mirth after winning a skirmish. It is all distinct, clear, and just so well executed. I feel for the throats of all the voice actors who had to scream their lungs out for these recordings, but their sacrifices weren’t in vain. This is easily the most impressed and blown away I’ve been about audio in a strategy game.

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      Conclusion
      Instead of going back to the drawing board and ending up losing the spark that defines the series (Command and Conquer 4 anyone?), Age of Empires IV manages to tactfully take the best parts of its predecessors and build a modern and accessible experience. This translates to stellar historical campaigns bolstered by documentary-style complementary videos and the fast-paced, deeply tactical, and exciting multiplayer playgrounds. Age of Empires IV can be extraordinarily complex if you want it to be. The creeping buildup of knowledge that translates to more lively and enjoyable games is an addicting cycle whether you’re interested in competitive multiplayer or in co-op against AI with friends.

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      This review of Age of Empires IV was conducted on a pre-release copy of the Steam version provided by Microsoft.

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      by Usama Jawad

      It's been a few weeks since Windows 11 started rolling out generally (check out our review here), but since it's being distributed in a staggered manner, not everyone has it yet, even if they're on a supported machine. Although there are ways to skip the queue and trigger the update immediately, it's perhaps advisable to know what you're getting into before you decide to make the jump to Microsoft's latest OS. This is exactly why we have been discussing Windows 11's features in more detail in our ongoing Closer Look series.

      So far, we have taken a look at Search, Widgets, the Start menu, Snap Layouts and Snap Groups, the Taskbar, quick settings and notifications, Virtual Desktops, power and battery settings, default apps configurations, File Explorer, context menus, Teams integration, the updated Clock app in Windows 11, the Microsoft Store, the Snipping Tool, the Paint app refresh, the lock screen, the revamped Photos app, and the voice typing experience. Today, we'll be discussing storage settings in Windows 11.

      For the purpose of this hands-on, we'll be taking a look at the generally available Windows 11 build versus a publicly available and up-to-date Windows 10 (version 21H1 build 19043.1288).

      Although we usually follow a format in our Closer Look articles where we first discuss the Windows 10 offerings before comparing it to Windows 11, we'll be deviating a bit from that this time because, frankly, it's not worth it considering there are smaller enhancements here and there rather than a full revamp.

      Storage settings in Windows 11 When you launch storage settings in Windows 11, you'll notice that the landing page has been redesigned. Now, you get the most essential information - which is your drive's storage space on the top -, while other information is nested at the bottom. For some reason, Windows 10 showed Storage Sense at top, which is fortunately not the case here.

      Below the drive's storage, you'll get some more granular categories such as Apps & features and Temporary files, but if you want to see more categories, you'll be directed to a dedicated page rather than a list being populated on the same page like Windows 10.

      The nesting of information in menus that you can expand according to your liking is a very neat touch. It means that you can now view all essential data on the same page without scrolling and can dive into specific settings only if you want too. Space is utilized very smartly here, and I'm a big fan of these changes, particularly because it does not require me to scroll past or even see settings that I barely use.

      Temporary files management in Windows 11 If you click on any of the dedicated categories, you'll be taken to their respective dedicated page. I noticed that Microsoft has made some nifty changes to the color contrast here so now it's easier to read highlighted content, and there's a clear division between each list item too.

      Storage Sense in Windows 11 Apart from offering the regular configurations present in Windows 10 already, Storage Sense now integrates directly with your locally available OneDrive content too. It offers you the ability to make files online-only if your don't open them for more than a specific amount of time.

      Personally, I'm a bit paranoid about automatic deletion of files from local or cloud storage, so I don't use Storage Sense, but Microsoft offers a decent set of options for those who feel the need for this capability.

      Cleanup recommendations in Windows 11 Storage settings in Windows 11 provides a handy "Cleanup recommendations" section too, which does exactly what the name implies. It offers you recommendations about deleting temporary files, large or unused files, files synced to the cloud, and apps that you haven't used recently. I think this is a decent option to have if you want to quickly free up small amounts of storage while having manual control over what you are deleting.

      Going back to the landing page of the Storage settings menu, you'll notice that all of the capabilities from Windows 10 have been carried over and are now nested under "Advanced storage settings". That said, there are a couple of changes that I'd like to highlight.

      New Disks & volumes pages in Windows 11 There is a new dedicated page called "Disks & volumes". This shows you high-level information about your storage device, its partitions, and their respective health statuses at a glance. You can also click on any partition to view its properties such as BitLocker encryption status and also change the label. I find this to be a very useful page even though it's not part of my daily workflows.

      Backup options in Windows 11 "View backup options" from Windows 10 has been replaced by "Backup options" in Windows 11. It now redirects to the Windows Backup page, from where you can backup your content to OneDrive, and remember apps and preferences. Windows 10 also offered an option called "Backup using File History", and while that setting can still be accessed using the native UI, it's no longer directly visible inside Storage settings. I'm assuming that this was done due to low usage and to push people towards OneDrive backups, but this is just speculation on my part.

      New UI for Storage Spaces in WIndows 11 Another thing I noted was that while Windows 10 also allows you to create Storage Spaces where you can store your files redundantly across different drives via storage pools, it did so via the legacy Windows interface that opens in a dedicated window. Microsoft has changed this up significantly in Windows 11 so that you can now configure this capability directly inside the Storage settings page, complete with a native Windows 11-look. I know it doesn't make a huge difference, but I think it's a step in the right direction in terms of giving the OS a consistent look and feel.

      Unfortunately, this change has not carried over to "Drive optimization", which still opens a dedicated legacy UI. Yes, it has rounded corners but it's outside of the native Windows 11 Settings app, which is a bit jarring.

      Overall, I think that although Microsoft hasn't treated Storage settings to a full revamp, it has still made some notable and positive changes to the overall UI. Whitespace is utilized much better and the nested menus ensure that you can easily find what you're looking for. I welcome the tighter integration with OneDrive as it also gives a more unified feel across Microsoft products. The new pages for Disks & volumes as well as Storage Spaces are decent changes and tie in well with the overall Windows 11 design, while providing useful capabilities. Some may bemoan the absence of backup via File History but I personally never used it so I don't miss it. Eitherway, the capability hasn't been completely removed so you can still access it if you want via the legacy Windows UI.

      Take a look at the section here or select from the links below to continue exploring Windows 11 in our ongoing "Closer Look" series:

      Closer Look: Search in Windows 11 Closer Look: Widgets in Windows 11 Closer Look: Start menu in Windows 11 Closer Look: Snap Layouts and Snap Groups in Windows 11 Closer Look: Taskbar in Windows 11 Closer Look: Quick settings and notifications in Windows 11 Closer Look: Virtual Desktops in Windows 11 Closer Look: Power and battery settings in Windows 11 Closer Look: Default apps settings in Windows 11 Closer Look: File Explorer in Windows 11 Closer Look: Context menus in Windows 11 Closer Look: Microsoft Teams integration in Windows 11 Closer Look: Clock app in Windows 11 Closer Look: Microsoft Store in Windows 11 Closer Look: Snipping Tool in Windows 11 Closer Look: Paint in Windows 11 Closer Look: Lock screen in Windows 11 Closer Look: Photos app in Windows 11 Closer Look: Voice typing in Windows 11
    • By anmol112
      How to create a bootable Windows 11 installation disk
      by Anmol Mehrotra



      Earlier this month, Microsoft started offering Windows 11 to a select group of users as the company kicks off its phased rollout. The new update comes with a brand-new UI, features as well as general improvements to the operating system.

      While, Windows 11 is now available publicly, Microsoft is offering the update to a small group of users so you may not see the update right away. However, if you are impatient and want to upgrade your system to Windows 11 then you are in luck. Microsoft is allowing users to manually upgrade devices through their Windows 11 installation assistant. However, that may not be feasible for those who have to upgrade multiple devices or want to clean install Windows 11. Luckily, Microsoft is also offering Windows 11 ISO so you can create your very own installation disk and install Windows 11 on multiple devices. There are a couple of ways to create an installation disk so you can follow the one that suits your needs.

      Method 1: Using Rufus
      First, head to Microsoft's website to download the ISO. For this method, you need to scroll down to the third option on Microsoft's website- "Download Windows 11 Disk Image (ISO)". Select Windows 11 from the dropdown and click on 'Download'. Now, select your preferred language from the dropdown and click on 'confirm'. Click on '64-bit Download' to start downloading the ISO. Once the ISO is downloaded, you will need to download a free utility called Rufus and open it. Now, insert a USB drive that you want to turn into a Windows 11 bootable drive. Make sure your USB drive is selected under the device option. Now, select 'Disk or ISO image' under boot selection option and click on 'Select'. Browse to the folder where you downloaded the Windows 11 ISO and select it. Select the 'Standard Windows installation (TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, 8GB+ RAM)' under image option. Do note that you will need to select the 'Extended Windows installation (no TPM 2.0/no Secure Boot, 8GB+ RAM)' option if you are planning to use the ISO for installation on unsupported hardware. Now, select the following options to complete the setup: Partition scheme - GPT Target system - UEFI (non CSM) Volume label - Name of the bootable media File system - NTFS Cluster size - 4096 bytes Do not change the advanced format settings unless you know what you are doing.

      Once you are ready, click on 'start'. You will now get a warning informing you that all the data on the USB drive will be deleted if you proceed. You need to click on 'ok' after you have taken a backup of the USB drive. Once the process is completed, you will have a bootable Windows 11 drive that you can plug into any system and install Windows 11.

      Method 2: Windows Media Creation tool
      If using Rufus sounds complicated, then don't worry as Microsoft has got you covered. The Redmond giant is also providing its own utility to help users create a Windows 11 bootable drive. You can follow the steps below to use Windows Media Creation tool in order to create a bootable drive:

      The first step is common for both the methods and you will need to open Microsoft's Windows 11 download page. This time you will be looking for the second option on the page- "Create Windows 11 Installation Media". Under the section, click on 'download' to get the Media Creation tool and open it. When prompted accept the Windows 11 license agreement.

      Now, you will get the language and edition options. By default, Microsoft will take the language and edition of the PC on which you are creating the installation media. However, if you want to change those options then uncheck the "Use the recommended options for this PC" option and click on 'next'.

      Now, you will get the option to create a bootable USB drive or an ISO file. Since, we are looking to create a bootable media, select the USB option. You can select the ISO option if you want to get an ISO file which can be burned onto a drive later using softwares such as Rufus. At this stage, you should plug in a USB drive that you want to use as a bootable media drive. Once done, click on 'next'. Select the USB drive that you just connected. Click on 'next' to start the download.

      Once the download and installation is finished, Windows 11 will be ready for use, and you just need to plug in the drive and start the installation process.

      You can always rollback to Windows 10 if you are unhappy with Windows 11. Alternatively, you can check out our comprehensive article on the Windows 11 update or one of the closer look articles if you want to take a deep dive into Windows 11's features.

      Looking to upgrade your own PC to Windows 11? We have a detailed guide to help you use the Microsoft Windows 11 Assistant to download and upgrade PCs from Windows 10 to Windows 11.

      Still on the fence about Windows 11? Check out our Windows 11 review to know if the update is right for you.