Microsoft partners with BBC Earth to bring Frozen Planet II content to Minecraft

Although Minecraft is the best-selling game of all time, one aspect of it that is often overlooked when talking about it is the educational and learning value it offers to younger generations. In fact, Microsoft has a specific SKU called Minecraft: Education Edition that targets specifically this sector. The company regularly updates it with new learning content and now, it has partnered with BBC Earth to bring Frozen Planet II content to the title.

A graphic for Frozen Planet II in Minecraft Education Edition

Microsoft has teamed up with BBC Earth to celebrate its nature program, Frozen Planet II. The collaboration has resulted in five free Minecraft worlds, the first of which is being made available today for Minecraft: Bedrock Edition and Minecraft: Education Edition players.

The idea behind this partnership is to allow players to experience icy habitats, learn about the effects of climate change, and explore the variety of flora and fauna in these virtual environments.

Minecraft: Education Edition's head Allison Mathews noted that:

We're excited to partner with BBC Studios in this unique venture – we're bringing a whole new perspective to Minecraft and, collaborating with the great minds behind Frozen Planet II, a truly authentic experience of some of the most fascinating and important areas of our world. It's never been more crucial to educate players everywhere about the effects of climate change and inspire a new generation of young people around sustainability. We believe it's our responsibility to do so, and this partnership is the next big step in that direction.

You can download the first of the five free maps via the Minecraft Marketplace today and check out Frozen Planet II on BBC One or BBC iPlayer.

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