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KeeperOfThePizza

I miss the old return to castle wolfenstein. The multiplayer was awesome.

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Andrew

Last week, RTTCW was on Steam promo :)

 

Maybe it's not retroactive? It's certainly affecting newer titles though:

 

RLdhh.png

 

XqYsNi3.png

 

The flags are visible for each title on the database so you can check and see if trading will be possible with the new Wolf game. Enjoy it while it lasts though because they are cracking down on it, particularly for those who abuse the regional price differences and/or sell them elsewhere.

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ShadowMajestic

I thought Germany was finally softening on this stuff regarding games and nazism or rather, gore in general.

Nothing new though, every previous Wolfenstein had it :) In a way, it wouldnt be Wolfenstein without the german filter.

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+Audioboxer

PVvxhdk.png

 

WTF is with developers and patches on these new consoles? At this size I think you're having a laugh calling it a patch...

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The Evil Overlord

True, why so big? and is this for both next gens?

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McKay

I was greatly annoyed Thief had a day 1 6GB patch.

 

I too think it's a laugh calling this a "patch". Feels more like missing stuff. I dread to think how many bug fixes could be squeezed into 7gb. 

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Andrew

It's bad enough the patch size is so big, but on top of a 50 GB game to start with is ridiculous :no:

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GotBored

At this rate we'll only be able to fit like 5 games on our consoles.

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DarkyDan

I guess that's why I've never owned a console.  Only PC's.  I enjoyed the Sega Mega Drive when it was out however.  Current consoles are just low spec PC's with their nuts in a vice grip/

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Noir Angel

Good lord, that's ridiculous. Glad I have fast connectivity.

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123456789A

At this rate we'll only be able to fit like 5 games on our consoles.

 

Hopefully they'll get that external hard drive support going soon.

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Brendeth

I guess that's why I've never owned a console.  Only PC's.  I enjoyed the Sega Mega Drive when it was out however.  Current consoles are just low spec PC's with their nuts in a vice grip/

This comment does not make sense. So PC games don't have patches?

On-topic: Man that is a big patch, I honestly am worried about the size of patches that games like Destiny will be giving to us.

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Phouchg

I'm sorry, that's chicken's droppings. That just speaks of crappy packaging format, crappy engine or that the game engine does not accept patches easily, so one has to replace whole (or large parts) of big data files to correct a few assets and logic errors. Bandwidth capabilities and enermous storage options have made middleware authors deadbeat lazy.

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The Evil Overlord

I'm sorry, that's chicken's droppings. That just speaks of crappy packaging format, crappy engine or that the game engine does not accept patches easily, so one has to replace whole (or large parts) of big data files to correct a few assets and logic errors. Great bandwidth and enermous storage options have made middleware authors deadbeat lazy.

Actually, I was just about to ask if that was the case, or is it the online aspect of the game or something...

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DarkyDan

This comment does not make sense. So PC games don't have patches?

On-topic: Man that is a big patch, I honestly am worried about the size of patches that games like Destiny will be giving to us.

 

It was more about the ability to add hard drive space and move games around to whichever drive you wish.  With consoles you're pretty much stuck with the specs you get, and can't incrementally upgrade.  There are exceptions to the rule of course.

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Brendeth

It was more about the ability to add hard drive space and move games around to whichever drive you wish.  With consoles you're pretty much stuck with the specs you get, and can't incrementally upgrade.  There are exceptions to the rule of course.

 

Apologies if I came out all defensive, I assumed you were just using this to be all "PC Master Race" haha, you have a very fair point in this. It's really only been a problem this generation, not having to install games on the X360 was awesome and is what lead me to preferring it over the PS3, didn't have to worry about all this disk space.

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Raa

Geez that's a bit rough... Am getting a bit fed up with these massive day 1 patches... beta test your games more! :/

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Lighthalzen

Wow... 5GB Patch. And back then when I thought 100MB was bad on Dial Up, lol.

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Max Norris

Jesus that's not a patch.. that's "a ton of crap we didn't have ready in time to ship."

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DarkyDan

Apologies if I came out all defensive, I assumed you were just using this to be all "PC Master Race" haha, you have a very fair point in this. It's really only been a problem this generation, not having to install games on the X360 was awesome and is what lead me to preferring it over the PS3, didn't have to worry about all this disk space.

 

I do come across as a PC snob sometimes, but with modern consoles I'm sure I'd have a lot of fun.. I just can't handle FPS's with a joypad, I'd need to plug keyboard and mouse into my PS4/XBONE, also for me personally any money spent on a console could go towards my PC

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neoadorable

I do come across as a PC snob sometimes, but with modern consoles I'm sure I'd have a lot of fun.. I just can't handle FPS's with a joypad, I'd need to plug keyboard and mouse into my PS4/XBONE, also for me personally any money spent on a console could go towards my PC

 

Have to say you did sound like another PC elitist bashing consoles, Dan, so i didn't get why Brendeth was apologizing. While of course you're right about storage expandability, it is stating the obvious. PCs are...PCs :D

 

As for this patch, or rather this trend of patches, while i do get this perverse fuzzy feeling inside reading about them because it's that anticipation of more stuff, it is true that one must ask why this is happening? Game is already 20% of our available space on X1/PS4...now another wait before we can actually play it? Maybe look at the bright side, at least someone's still working on it and paying attention to stuff that needs fixing. Not so bright side: they should have done this months ago :cry:

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neoadorable

HAIL IP-BASED-HYDRA! :devil:

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DirtyLarry

Damn as much as I am looking forward to this game, I take this as not the best of news no matter how you slice it. Any game that requires a 5-7 GB patch on Day 1 is a game that was rushed. I truly cannot see it any other way.

Whether they fix the fact it was rushed or just or adding on top of the fact it was rushed is the major question.

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spenser.d

I feel like the same things were probably said five or ten or twenty years ago about patch sizes then. That said they do seem peculiarly large. I personally don't care, but it does seem odd.

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neoadorable

I thought Germany was finally softening on this stuff regarding games and nazism or rather, gore in general.

Nothing new though, every previous Wolfenstein had it :) In a way, it wouldnt be Wolfenstein without the german filter.

 

Very true, they might as well call it Wolfstone: Take Out Order and have COBRA as the villains instead of the Nazis. But it's their country, their land, their LAWS (not so subtle Viktor Reznov reference for the inititated :laugh: )

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