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Blackhearted

A huge boost, too. I received a Mewtwo before my Cyndaquil evolved into Quilava and I was really surprised at the exp difference between a traded and non-traded pokemon. While playing HeartGold, I tried to remember what Gold even looked like on the Gameboy Colour. So... I found my old lime green GBC and played Gold. For some reason, my original save file became corrupted and the cartridge can't keep a save file. In other words, I always have to start a new game if I turn it off. The difference between the two though are immense. I'm shocked that I was able to play it without a back light. The only thing Gold had over HeartGold was the load times for everything. It was near-instantaneous compared to the time it took to enter a pokemon centre in HeartGold.

The battery in the cart is probably dead and is likely the reason you can't save. The game did come out about 12 years ago after all.

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Zeikku

I don't play this any more because I've been busy with developing Pok?mon: Liquid Crystal which is a Crystal remake for the GBA - I've been working on it for the past five years. I just wasn't entirely happy with HG/SS - I was super let down by the music and redesign of the maps and things.

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Lunfai

I don't play this any more because I've been busy with developing Pok?mon: Liquid Crystal which is a Crystal remake for the GBA - I've been working on it for the past five years. I just wasn't entirely happy with HG/SS - I was super let down by the music and redesign of the maps and things.

I loved Gold and Silver, I'm mad enough to say that I liked them more to Red, Blue & Yellow. Just for the fact that I liked how it evolved, I remember reading a kids magazine when I was younger that had exclusive details on Gold and Silver, and it showed pictures of Day and Night, and I was blown away. I don't think the jump from GS/C -> RS/E could compete, I just loved every aspect of it, and you could revisit Kanto, track down the legendaries while they run around Jhoto, and waking up early just to catch some pokemons that would appear at Dawn, it was just so good.

I'm thinking about playing this, I've not had the chance to but it can't be that bad of a re-make. Sure Red and Blue introduced me to pokemon, but gold and silver just made me love the way pokemon evolved as a game, and in advance when they took out some of these elements, I was sad and didn't like the newly introduced pokemon. Long live the 1st and 2nd gen.

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Yusuf M.

The battery in the cart is probably dead and is likely the reason you can't save. The game did come out about 12 years ago after all.

You're right. I just wish I had a chance to play it before the battery died.

I don't play this any more because I've been busy with developing Pok?mon: Liquid Crystal which is a Crystal remake for the GBA - I've been working on it for the past five years. I just wasn't entirely happy with HG/SS - I was super let down by the music and redesign of the maps and things.

Wow, that looks really cool. I'll have to give it a try soon. :)

I loved Gold and Silver, I'm mad enough to say that I liked them more to Red, Blue & Yellow. Just for the fact that I liked how it evolved, I remember reading a kids magazine when I was younger that had exclusive details on Gold and Silver, and it showed pictures of Day and Night, and I was blown away. I don't think the jump from GS/C -> RS/E could compete, I just loved every aspect of it, and you could revisit Kanto, track down the legendaries while they run around Jhoto, and waking up early just to catch some pokemons that would appear at Dawn, it was just so good.

I'm thinking about playing this, I've not had the chance to but it can't be that bad of a re-make. Sure Red and Blue introduced me to pokemon, but gold and silver just made me love the way pokemon evolved as a game, and in advance when they took out some of these elements, I was sad and didn't like the newly introduced pokemon. Long live the 1st and 2nd gen.

Me too. The first Pokemon game I played was Yellow and later on, I completed Red and Blue. But once I got Gold version, I couldn't put it down. To this day, it's still my favourite Pokemon game. I bought Sapphire for my GBA SP and it took me awhile to complete it. At first, I liked the improved graphics and the legendary Pokemon but that wasn't enough to keep me interested. The more I played, the more I realized I didn't really like it. I gave Black version a try and didn't like it either. I prefer the graphics of HeartGold over the excessive "3Dness" of Black.

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Lee G.
You're right. I just wish I had a chance to play it before the battery died.

My copy of Silver lost its game save file, and won't save either. I want to order a Game Boy screwdriver (or try to open the cartridge using a Bic pen) so I can replace the battery. This reminds me that I want to find a way to back up my game save of Pok?mon Yellow before the battery dies. I started playing that almost 12 years ago!

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johnnyq3

My copy of Silver lost its game save file, and won't save either. I want to order a Game Boy screwdriver (or try to open the cartridge using a Bic pen) so I can replace the battery. This reminds me that I want to find a way to back up my game save of Pok?mon Yellow before the battery dies. I started playing that almost 12 years ago!

You can try to back it up with a Game boy memory card.
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Lee G.
You can try to back it up with a Game boy memory card.

Thanks! I'll look into getting one.

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