Apple warns about having the iPhone 12 close to pacemakers

Apple announced its iPhone 12 devices a few months ago, coupled with the MagSafe technology previously found in MacBooks. Numerous publications and media outlets have warned of the potential dangers of increased electromagnetic interference from new iPhone models and MagSafe accessories being used in close vicinity of medical devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators. Apple has now published a public advisory on the topic.

As spotted by MacRumors over the weekend, Apple has published a dedicated advisory, which describes the issue in more detail. The firm has confirmed that its latest iPhone devices contain more magnets than previous models, but they are not "expected" to pose a greater threat. However, all MagSafe accessories and iPhone devices do emit electromagnetic fields that can potentially interfere with medical devices.

The iPhone 12, mini, Pro, Pro Max, and MagSafe accessories have been explicitly named in the advisory. Apple went on to say that:

Medical devices such as implanted pacemakers and defibrillators might contain sensors that respond to magnets and radios when in close contact. To avoid any potential interactions with these devices, keep your iPhone and MagSafe accessories a safe distance away from your device (more than 6 inches / 15 cm apart or more than 12 inches / 30 cm apart if wirelessly charging). But consult with your physician and your device manufacturer for specific guidelines.

Consult your physician and medical device manufacturer for information specific to your medical device and whether you need to maintain a safe distance of separation between your medical device and iPhone or any MagSafe accessories. Manufacturers often provide recommendations on the safe use of their devices around wireless or magnetic products to prevent possible interference. If you suspect iPhone or any MagSafe accessories are interfering with your medical device, stop using your iPhone or MagSafe accessories.

Given Apple's cautionary wording, it is recommended that if you use critical medical devices, you should consult a physician or the vendor of the medical device prior to purchasing an iPhone 12 and MagSafe accessories. It remains to be seen if this potential safety hazard will encourage the Cupertino giant to be warier in designing future iterations of iPhone devices and MagSafe accessories.

Source: Apple via MacRumors

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